Customer Reviews for

The Reunion

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  • Posted September 12, 2012

    ¿Some who seem least important now will be the greatest then and

    “Some who seem least important now will be the greatest then and some who are the greatest now will be least important then.” Luke 13:20

    Everything lost can be found.

    Aaron Miller is a veteran of the Viet Nam War. Like many, he returned broken in body and soul. He got off the pain drugs and drink and made Jesus his Savior and Lord, but by then, he lost jobs, self-respect, and his family.

    Now he lives in the shed along with his tools and workbench. He is a handyman at a trailer park. The only things holding value are a box he had not opened in years and framed Polaroid picture of his children he had received the Christmas before he came home from Nam.

    Quietly he cares for the trailers and hearts of other broken people. There was Heather in Lot 31, a seventeen-year-old runaway pregnant by her abusive boyfriend. Moe’s elderly widow, who does not want to leave the last place they lived together. Billy the wheelchair bound Viet Nam vet who hid his pistol before he answered Aaron’s knocking at his door.

    What he does not know is three vets have hired David Russo to find him. Russo is a newspaper reporter who is writing a book about heroes of the Viet Nam. He leaves Texas knowing only Aaron’s name.

    Once again Dan Walsh weaves stories within stories, rich with characters his readers will not soon forget. There is romance, intrigue, tension, mystery, and God, who believes everyone deserves a second chance.

    Another heartwarming book by a stellar writer, this book will linger in your mind and continue to warm your heart long after you give it to a friend.

    Dan Walsh honors all unsung heroes and all veterans, especially those of the Viet Nam War, who keep on giving because it is the right thing to do.

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    Watch out...I'm preparing to gush...I've long been a fan of Dan

    Watch out...I'm preparing to gush...I've long been a fan of Dan Walsh's books, but this book is absolutely soul-touching. Don't get this book unless you want to feel...deeply. And honor vets...and friendship...and love. My husband stole this book the day it arrived and couldn't put it down. He reads widely and has put down one of Dan's books, but this one he literally carried around the house. He kept telling me I'd love it. Of course I would...but then I read it. It has everything I expect in a Dan Walsh book: well-drawn characters, stories that aren't large-scale, but in the details I find a story that pulls me in. This book reminded me of his first and award-winning book, The Unfinished Gift. It reaches a deeper level that resonated.

    I finished the book as I was running on the treadmill. I couldn't get off even as the story had me in tears. It is truly touching: a story about a man being given honor and the chance many of us never get: seeing our lives as others see it. Oh and be absolutely sure you read the author note. Dan, you have honored men like my Dad who fought in Vietnam. Thank you for bringing such humanity to them. Thank you for writing this book. Oh look, I've teared up again.

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  • Posted September 9, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    If you could see me now, you'd notice that I am standing while a

    If you could see me now, you'd notice that I am standing while applauding. I just finished reading this excellent novel, and the author, Dan Walsh, deserves my standing ovation.

    This Christian fiction causes the reader to run the gamut of emotions. The characters are believable; the plot is well drawn. There are few works that capture the reader's attention as well as this one.

    Prepare to enjoy this read! Buy a copy, and pick up a box of tissues while you're at it. When you finish reading, you might want to stand with me to applaud.

    Thank you to Donna Hausler at Baker Publishing Group for my copy.

    Available September 2012 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.

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  • Posted September 7, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    In 1987 Aaron Miller found a new life when he found God. He le


    In 1987 Aaron Miller found a new life when he found God. He left behind the drugs and alcohol that had cost him his family and propelled him into homelessness. Now over twenty five years later, Aaron works as a trailer park handy man, too poor to even afford one of the run down trailers he fixes daily. Most would see him as an insignificant man doing menial, basically insignificant work. But within the first pages, readers will see Aaron for his true self, a man whose daily steps live the gospel as he treats each person in his path with dignity and care. Within the trailer park and his church, those who appreciate Aaron's caring ways have no idea that the aging man is a true war hero, a medal of honor recipient who saved three Marines back in Vietnam.

    Those three men, who have gone on to successful lives, have the means to gather each year for a reunion. Only now in their sixties do they realize that they still owe their lives to Aaron, who seems to have totally disappeared. Committed to finding Aaron if he is still alive and finally thanking him, they seek the help of Dave Russo, a reporter who has recently decided to research Vietnam War veterans as a way to honor his own father who died in that war.

    Starting with little more than a name, Russo eventually finds that Aaron Miller had two children -- children who are now adults - children who grew up with only vague memories of a father who disappeared when they were toddlers. They do not even know that Aaron won a medal of honor. For daughter Karen, especially, there is only emptiness where love for a father should be. If Dave finds Aaron, will Karen be strong enough to meet the man she feels abandoned her? Dan Walsh has written an emotional tale that reminds us that there are amazing stories everywhere if we stop and listen.

    I don't believe I have read any books by Dan Walsh prior to this, but I am going to be checking out other titles. He writes with a heart that reminds me of Nicholas Sparks and Richard Paul Evans. I received a copy of The Reunion for review purposes from NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

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