Customer Reviews for

The Skeleton Box (Starvation Lake Series #3)

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted March 3, 2012

    Unable to recommended

    Since this book has not yet been published, it's impossible to review!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2014

    First thing would be i d theft of social security number

    Therefore will not read as their accoubts have all been accessed and cleared out granny

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2014

    The Skeleton Box is the third book in Bryan Gruley's Starvation

    The Skeleton Box is the third book in Bryan Gruley's Starvation Lake Mystery series.  I have read all three books, and I thought all were very well written.  The author worked for a newspaper and covered stories just like his protagonist Gus Carpenter.  He creates very likeable characters and in some cases I was sorry they died in the course of the series.  Starvation Lake is a town that is slowly fading away and dying.  He is the editor of the Newspaper and gets involved with events when crimes are commited in Stravation Lake.  This book  begins when a series of home break-ins begin on Bingo Night.  And it quickly escalates to more serious crimes.  This book is worth reading.  It will keep you turning pages to the very end.  Small town newspapers serve a purpose, and their disappearance is a national problem.  Somebody has to keep an eye on thieves, politicians, and the police department.  Logging onto the internet to read a newspaper isn't as attention-getting as having to walk out to your sidewalk.  Give this book a read!  

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  • Posted February 7, 2014

    loved it!!

    I read the whole series, I loved them all. The story plays out in a small hockey town, so if don't know much about the sport, you will learn the basics. Good story line, kept you guessing. I really hope there will be another in the series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    The best

    Enjoyed this third book in the series!

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  • Posted September 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    End of the Trilogy

    A very old and deep-seated secret brings to an end the Starvation Lake trilogy. It begins with a series of home invasions in the quaint Michigan town on Bingo Night, when inhabitants are obviously away from their houses. The only mystery, however, is that nothing seems to be missing and the sheriff’s inability to solve the crimes is affecting his reelection efforts.

    Then the home of Gus Carpenter’s mother, who appears to be in the early throes of dementia, is invaded on a night she chooses to go to sleep instead of playing bingo, and her best friend is found dead on the bathroom floor, bringing Gus to accelerate his investigation as editor of the local paper, and uncovering a scandal of epic and personal proportions rooted in the long past.

    This novel is somewhat less satisfying than the preceding two books in the series, despite the same characters and setting. The town’s (and the author’s) enthusiasm for ice hockey remains pleasant and exciting, and Gus’ efforts to uncover the truth are rewarding. The writing is on the same high plane of its predecessors, but somehow it doesn’t quite measure up to that admittedly lofty standard.

    Frankly, if this does in fact conclude the Starvation Lake series, I’ll miss the town, and I hope the author has another gem up his sleeve.

    Recommended.

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  • Posted July 12, 2012

    Recommend

    A great Read, I'm looking forward to the next one!

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  • Posted June 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    There are more than a few secrets hiding in the small town of St

    There are more than a few secrets hiding in the small town of Starvation Lake, Michigan, and this author has brought them to the surface in such a way that if you wanted to put the book down for another day, you could not.

    As the story opens, we learn that there have been a rash a break-ins in town recently and they have all happened when the residents are away playing bingo at the local Catholic Church. The eerie thing about these break-ins is that nothing is stolen, the burglar just goes through the residents' personal papers.

    The main character, Gus Carpenter, runs the local paper, The Pine County Pilot, and he and his reporter, Luke Whistler, are on the case. They like to try to shake up the local police as they have had no luck at all in finding the Bingo Night Burgler. Sadly, one night, two ladies decide not to go to bingo and are in the house (which happens to be Gus's mother's house) when the burglar arrives and unfortunatly, one of them is killed. The victim is Phyllis Bontrager, the mother of Gus's former girlfriend, Darlene, who is a police officer and Bea Carpenter's best friend. Bea Carpenter, Gus's mother, is suffering from the first stages of dememtia and remembers very little of the break-in. The Sheriff, Dingus Aho, who is coming up for election, is under pressure to solve these crimes and, to top it all off, one of his officers is out on the streets asking the townspeople to vote for him for Sheriff and he will clean up the mess. Many plots come to the fore at this time. Gus, editor of the town newspaper wants to cover the crime and most others just want to cover the crime up; he still has feelings for his ex-girlfriend, and he is always fighting with the people who own the newspaper and want to shut it down and last, but certainly not least he is helping to coach the town hockey team, The River Rats, in their quest for the state junior hockey championship.

    Now, back to the secrets. Gus and Luke (who has his own agenda) are out there trying to dig up some clues to Phyllis's murder and the burglaries. They come up against numerous blank walls including a secret box that his mother has been keeping for many years. Also, Luke has some secrets too and is investigating on his own. It seems that the mystery leads them to the long-ago disappearance of a Roman Catholic nun from the local diocese and a box that was buried in the woods. The reader will feel like they can talk, touch, stand up and cheer for the hockey team and, ride along with the characters in this novel of a small-town world where everyone knows everyone and everyone else's business. This is the third in a series about Gus Carpenter (the others are The Hanging Tree and Starvation Lake). Although The Skeleton Box is definitely a stand alone novel, it might be interesting to read the others first just to see where everyone came from.

    Quill Says: Sometimes a secret should remain a secret...don't be so quick to try and solve the puzzle. This is a wonderfully written book that yanks you right into this small town world and you won't want to stop until the last page. A definite keeper!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2012

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