Customer Reviews for

The Souls of Black Folk (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 3.5
( 67 )
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(25)

4 Star

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(10)

2 Star

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(11)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

A must-read for all!

W.E.B DuBois' The Souls of Black Folk successfully elucidates the paradoxical existence of the African American. His main thesis embellishes the ¿double-consciousness¿ of the African American (an American of African heritage or the African displaced in America) and the ...
W.E.B DuBois' The Souls of Black Folk successfully elucidates the paradoxical existence of the African American. His main thesis embellishes the ¿double-consciousness¿ of the African American (an American of African heritage or the African displaced in America) and the hardships that emerge as a result. More specifically, the African American, detached from his ancestral homeland and having some significant investment in the development of this nation (i.e. slavery), longs to receive the constitutional gifts entitled to its citizens. However, because the ¿American dream¿ was conceived by and for the benefit of white Christian men of substantial wealth, and moreover, because this enabled group continuously fails or refuses to recognize their darker counterparts as equals, the African American can never truly realize his place among society. Likewise, the endless, and often fruitless, process of assimilating with mainstream American culture equates with the gradual loss of ethnic authenticity. Consequently, the African American is left at war with his own identity. Finally, DuBois exposes the socioeconomic security on behalf of white America beneath the stronghold of racism, as well as the contradictions of American values with the maintenance of social color lines . The Souls of Black Folk is presented in 14 essays, each beginning with a slave hymnal. Harvard educated DuBois employs both black vernacular and academic language, further emphasizing the duality of the African American experience. Though DuBois¿ Souls analyzes black culture in context of the early 1900s, his ideas, for the most part, hold true today and have myriad applications. Regardless of background, this text provides original and genuine insight to the American societal dynamic based on historical social investigation. I challenge you to read this work whole-heartedly and find a personal meaning! - C.G. F.

posted by Anonymous on December 9, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Very informative, also very tedious

This here book is my summer assignment for my Junior year in high school. It took me a month to read the first chapter and I had to force myself to finish the others three weeks before school started. I never felt so tortured. As informative as it is, it seems like DuBo...
This here book is my summer assignment for my Junior year in high school. It took me a month to read the first chapter and I had to force myself to finish the others three weeks before school started. I never felt so tortured. As informative as it is, it seems like DuBois dragged on and on his sentences and used such colorful words to make his essay so 'pretty-like.' A whole paragraph could of been simplied to one sentence. Once my assignment is done, I would never want to see this book ever again.

posted by Anonymous on September 3, 2005

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2006

    Difficult

    I had to read this in my sophomore year of High School. My teacher told me it was a book for Juniors in college. This book is very difficult to understand. I respect everything African Americans had to go through but Du Bois seems to talk in so many metaphors that it confuses you so much that you don't want to know what A.A. had to go through!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted February 3, 2013

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    Posted February 22, 2011

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    Posted March 3, 2011

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    Posted May 10, 2011

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