Customer Reviews for

The South Was Right!

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Darn tootin'

I am so tired of Yankees and how rude they are and coming down to the South, taking it over and basically ruining our culture and cities. Therefore, I have an extremely biased opinion on this book. I think it's great, and I think it is about time the truth came out ab...
I am so tired of Yankees and how rude they are and coming down to the South, taking it over and basically ruining our culture and cities. Therefore, I have an extremely biased opinion on this book. I think it's great, and I think it is about time the truth came out about what the Civil War was really about.

posted by 134688 on October 15, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

A Specious Claim

The authors, and many on this comment thread, make a specious claim when they vehemntly deny the primary role slavery played in the decision of southern convention of secession to leave the union. The Kennedys try to reestablish the southern hold over the interpretatio...
The authors, and many on this comment thread, make a specious claim when they vehemntly deny the primary role slavery played in the decision of southern convention of secession to leave the union. The Kennedys try to reestablish the southern hold over the interpretation of this event in history. They are even wrong on the account that the north held sway over this interpretation for so long. The historiography just doesn't agree with them. (Please read James Loewen's books concerning US history textbooks.) Moreover, the southern secessionists themselves do not agree with them. The state of Mississippi's secession convention made it clear why they were leaving the union in the face of the anticipation of a fairly elected presidential administration when they wrote their "A Declaration of the Immediate Causes which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the Federal Union". In it they convention states, "Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery-- the greatest material interest of the world". They go on to list grievances that all, every one of them, deal with slavery. I will list just a few key items for you:

"That we do not overstate the dangers to our institution, a reference to a few facts will sufficiently prove.

The hostility to this institution commenced before the adoption of the Constitution, and was manifested in the well-known Ordinance of 1787, in regard to the Northwestern Territory.

It [the hostility of northern abolitionist] has grown until it denies the right of property in slaves, and refuses protection to that right on the high seas, in the Territories, and wherever the government of the United States had jurisdiction.

It [the Union] advocates negro equality, socially and politically, and promotes insurrection and incendiarism in our midst."

History is a dangerous tool left in the hands of propagandists like the Kennedys. Do your research and see how wrong these guys are.

Try Chandra Mannings examination of soldier's letters in her "What This Cruel War Was Over".

I implore you to discover this countries real history of racial hatred and institutionalized racism. It is important. (Yes, the north was just as racist).

posted by DylanVoltaire on January 16, 2010

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Enlightening

    The author does an excellent job proving that slavery
    was just a smoke screen to justify the real reasons
    the North invaded the South. Regardless of what side
    you sympothize with, this is a must read for any student
    of accurate history.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2008

    Retired Soldier from the North

    I recommend anyone reading this book have an open mind, in oreder to give it a fair shot. If there is one thing I have learned in all my military and life experience there are always two sides to every story.I have aserved with alot of Southerners in the military white and black and I certainly do not think they should have pride in their heritage and where they are from. The authors did do a great deal of research,but at the same time I think they have the impression that all northern people are all the same, a ridiculous premise. The book is a good read, some of the facts are disturbing,but true alot of what General Sherman did would probably land him in jail today and the collatoral damage to the civilian population and food supply was probably unnecessary considering these were fellow Americans. I think that perhaps the educational system could perhaps give this book a look and teach the history of this war more fairly and not demonize the South. I am proud to be American and honored to have served with all americans from everywhere

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2004

    excellent book

    This book quickly grabbed my attention, and provided me with many facts that are pretty much unheard of. My opinion of the *southern war for independance* indeed has changed. Now that i have read it, I definetely think that the southerners deserved their independance, and the authors did make good points for why they should have won. However, I must say this book is biased, and has propoganda in it as well. In order for a point of view to be accurate, you have to state the negative and the positive, and I didn't encounter anyreasons that perhaps suggest that there were wrongs with the South, it only stated what was wrong about the north- and I think that factor weakens the authors arguments. Remember, there can't be a war just because one side was evil, there were mistakes that both the north and the south made. In addition, I was curious to see some arguments for racist groups such as the KKK, or the LIttle Rock school incident. Overall I recommend the book, but only read it if you are open-minded and read scholarly books that are *pro* North--just so you can have both sides of the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2006

    Separate The Tares From the Wheat

    I've heard that people have said that this book has hurt the cause of those, who see the present-day view of the Civil War as propagandized and want to have a balanced view of this history taught in our schools and disseminated among the American people. I agree that there are both bad and good parts to this book and here is a simple solution. The chapters and parts of the book that deal with racial and political matters of the present, ignore. They are an attempt to propose anachronistic solutions to modern problems that are far too complicated than those of 140 years ago. Those chapters that deal with the racial and political matters of the pre-Civil War era, read a second time, take notes, and memorize as much as possible. It all makes perfect sense.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2002

    Neither side was right...

    I stand by this 100% because t/north wasn't no better than t/south in terms of t/majority of how African-American's were treated & still are treated. Both sides had their own hate for African-American's. If this wasn't true then why did White's feel they had to segarate t/blacks from t/whites?...long after t/civil war ended? There may have been a small minority of both sides who was true to the "cause", (freeing slaves). But t/war was just a waste of lives, cause niether was better than t/other. I do support t/South in wanting to protect their rights, but who has t/right to OWN ANOTHER PERSON? "NO ONE". We'll always look back, ponder who was right/wrong. The main thing though, who feared who- North and South, or Billy Yank' and Johnny Reb', feared someone different. (The black man/woman, for when you fear something you attack it). The book shows a side of t/civil war we weren't shown in school, it's a very interesting and educational read. (Here's one for both sides of t/civil war- What if the shoe was on the other foot??, meaning whites were t/slaves & blacks were t/master's. Think about it, then maybe one day we can all truely be United.) Hence t/words- UNITED STATES...

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