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The Stonecutter (Fjällbacka Series #3)

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Great Book!

...and you can buy it on Amazon for 6 bucks. The asking price here is simply outrageous!

posted by KahanaFrog on August 18, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

An Inter­est­ing Read

The Stone­cut­ter by Camilla Läck­berg is the third novel in the Fjall­backa mys­tery series. The series fea­tures police­man Patrik Hed­strom who works in a small town in Sweden.

A fish­er­man at the small town of Fjall­backa pulls out the body of a small girl, she ...
The Stone­cut­ter by Camilla Läck­berg is the third novel in the Fjall­backa mys­tery series. The series fea­tures police­man Patrik Hed­strom who works in a small town in Sweden.

A fish­er­man at the small town of Fjall­backa pulls out the body of a small girl, she seems to have drowned but soon it is dis­cov­ered that it is not the case. Police offi­cer Patrik Hed­strom, a new father and friend of the girl’s par­ents, is put on the case. But Patrik dis­cov­ers a sin­is­ter side of this small town which is much more than he anticipated.

It’s 1923, Agnes a stub­born, rich and spoiled got preg­nant by one of her father’s work­ers. When her father rejects her, Agnes sets in motion events which will have far reach­ing consequences.

I chose to read The Stone­cut­ter by Camilla Läck­berg because I read one of her pre­vi­ous books, The Ice Princess, and enjoyed it. There is another book in the series called The Preacher which I have not yet read.

This book has a dif­fer­ent struc­ture than the pre­vi­ous one I read, the story alter­nates between past and present, while the time shifts (at the begin­ning of every chap­ter and are not con­fus­ing one bit) have very lit­tle to do with the actual mys­tery, I felt that they do come together skill­fully at the end. I did find the book excit­ing, Ms. Läckberg’s growth as an author is evident.

The author jug­gles many issues dur­ing the story. Some have much to do with the mys­tery, some are just to throw the reader off track, and oth­ers have absolutely noth­ing to do with the mys­tery but sim­ply intro­duce us to the char­ac­ters’ psy­che and allow growth.

One of the side issues, one that has noth­ing to do with the story, is post­par­tum depres­sion which seems to affect many women in Fjall­backa. It seemed that the small town suf­fers from a case of post­par­tum depres­sion but I think that we, as a soci­ety, don’t rec­og­nize how many women this diag­no­sis. The Ms. Läck­berg does rec­og­nize the dif­fi­cul­ties of stay at home moms. Not only the hard work which goes into tak­ing care of a baby or a tod­dler, but also the lack of appre­ci­a­tion felt by soci­ety at large.

Unbe­knownst to the reader, until prac­ti­cally the end of the story, the author spends a lot of time try­ing to diag­nose what lies behind evil. The inher­ent assump­tion is that peo­ple are made evil, not born (even though that is the case for some) and even if they do some­thing bad, in their mind, they can­not see what they did wrong. Per­son­ally I found this aspect of the book the most fas­ci­nat­ing and extremely well done, it had me think­ing about this issue for days afterwards.

The descrip­tions of small town life in Swe­den are fas­ci­nat­ing and filled with imagery. Like any small town, together with the quaint liv­ing come small town prob­lems and pol­i­tics. Swedish soci­ety is also rep­re­sented in this book in all its glory and its dark&

posted by Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com on June 28, 2012

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  • Posted June 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An Inter­est­ing Read

    The Stone­cut­ter by Camilla Läck­berg is the third novel in the Fjall­backa mys­tery series. The series fea­tures police­man Patrik Hed­strom who works in a small town in Sweden.

    A fish­er­man at the small town of Fjall­backa pulls out the body of a small girl, she seems to have drowned but soon it is dis­cov­ered that it is not the case. Police offi­cer Patrik Hed­strom, a new father and friend of the girl’s par­ents, is put on the case. But Patrik dis­cov­ers a sin­is­ter side of this small town which is much more than he anticipated.

    It’s 1923, Agnes a stub­born, rich and spoiled got preg­nant by one of her father’s work­ers. When her father rejects her, Agnes sets in motion events which will have far reach­ing consequences.

    I chose to read The Stone­cut­ter by Camilla Läck­berg because I read one of her pre­vi­ous books, The Ice Princess, and enjoyed it. There is another book in the series called The Preacher which I have not yet read.

    This book has a dif­fer­ent struc­ture than the pre­vi­ous one I read, the story alter­nates between past and present, while the time shifts (at the begin­ning of every chap­ter and are not con­fus­ing one bit) have very lit­tle to do with the actual mys­tery, I felt that they do come together skill­fully at the end. I did find the book excit­ing, Ms. Läckberg’s growth as an author is evident.

    The author jug­gles many issues dur­ing the story. Some have much to do with the mys­tery, some are just to throw the reader off track, and oth­ers have absolutely noth­ing to do with the mys­tery but sim­ply intro­duce us to the char­ac­ters’ psy­che and allow growth.

    One of the side issues, one that has noth­ing to do with the story, is post­par­tum depres­sion which seems to affect many women in Fjall­backa. It seemed that the small town suf­fers from a case of post­par­tum depres­sion but I think that we, as a soci­ety, don’t rec­og­nize how many women this diag­no­sis. The Ms. Läck­berg does rec­og­nize the dif­fi­cul­ties of stay at home moms. Not only the hard work which goes into tak­ing care of a baby or a tod­dler, but also the lack of appre­ci­a­tion felt by soci­ety at large.

    Unbe­knownst to the reader, until prac­ti­cally the end of the story, the author spends a lot of time try­ing to diag­nose what lies behind evil. The inher­ent assump­tion is that peo­ple are made evil, not born (even though that is the case for some) and even if they do some­thing bad, in their mind, they can­not see what they did wrong. Per­son­ally I found this aspect of the book the most fas­ci­nat­ing and extremely well done, it had me think­ing about this issue for days afterwards.

    The descrip­tions of small town life in Swe­den are fas­ci­nat­ing and filled with imagery. Like any small town, together with the quaint liv­ing come small town prob­lems and pol­i­tics. Swedish soci­ety is also rep­re­sented in this book in all its glory and its dark&

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2013

    Very far-fetched... That so many people lacking any sense, let a

    Very far-fetched... That so many people lacking any sense, let alone common sense, are gathered in the small community where Lackberg's novels take place is far from plausible. There are attacks on children and mothers have no qualms leaving their children out on a pram in front of a market, or in front of the door of their house (why?)... Incompetent policemen, headed by a delusional chief... Causes of crime reaching back decades... I would avoid it...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 23, 2013

    this book was hard to read. it was way too long, too detailed, r

    this book was hard to read. it was way too long, too detailed, repetitive, and the plot was not all that good or clever. i do not recommend it for purchase. get it from the library. lackberg dragged this one out and not in a good way.

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