Customer Reviews for

The Super Bowl of Advertising: How the Commercials Won the Game

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2004

    Super facts between snaps about Super Sunday!

    ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising¿ recounts the successes, miracles and flops from all 37 Super Bowls not from the couch, but from inside the advertising agencies that created the spots and the companies that footed the multi-million dollar bills. ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising,¿ brings out little-known facts about Super Bowl Sunday besides the cost-per-second of commercials over the years. Kanner¿s work, like advertising, is all about presentation as ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising,¿ with its 6x9 size and use of glossy white pages, filled with video stills of commercials allow the memories of those 30-second sellers to be recalled with ease. ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising,¿ is a trip down advertising¿s memory lane. Coca-Cola¿s ¿I¿d like to teach the world to sing,¿ debuted during Super Bowl VI followed by Mean Joe Greene¿s change of heart after a cold Coke at Super Bowl VII. McDonald¿s ¿You Deserve a Break Today¿ was seen in 1971 with the accompanying music and jingle from Barry Manilow. The golden arches tounge-twister about its Big Mac ingredients was first heard in 1974. In 1977, Brother Dominick provided 500 more copies for the abbot utilizing the newly innovative Xerox Copiers with the tag line, ¿It¿s a miracle.¿ 1984 the year and the book by George Orwell created a wave that every ad agency wanted to ride and companies wanted to emulate. The Apple Computer commercial, directed by Ridley Scott, shattered the minds of advertisers and viewers when an athletic blonde hurdles a sledgehammer at the screen, tinted blue, exploding and announcing that Apple Computer will introduce the Macintosh later that week. The ad ran only once, didn¿t even show the product but it was played again and again on network television, morning shows and still registers today with viewers. In the 1990¿s advertisers were forced to decide on what way to approach their viewers as the Gulf War broke out prior to Super Bowl XXIV. While Coca-Cola went patriotic, Diet Pepsi went with ¿The Right One, Baby!¿ with Ray Charles and the Uh-Huh Girls. No advertising book would be complete without paying homage to the King of Beers, Budweiser, and its numerous memorable spots on Super Sunday. From Clydesdales, to frogs, to lizards, to copiers, catch phrases and the ¿Bud Bowl¿ ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising,¿ describes how Anheuser-Busch became the King of Super Sunday. Not to be forgotten is the dot.com craze, ads and even faster bust with only Monster.com and HotJobs.com surviving the blitz of 2001. If you watched it on Super Sunday, like it or even hated it, ¿The Super Bowl of Advertising¿ is a quick look back at the action off the gridiron and many of the memories that have stayed with us when the final scores may have faded from memory.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2004

    Great MRKTing

    WOW, I am currently a Marketing student at LeTourneau University in East Texas and this book hits it right on the head.It shows how marketing and advertising go hand in hand, and this book illustrates just how an advertisment brings brand awareness to a brand. Talk about awareness, it just costs $2-2.5 million a spot...no big deal right?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1