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The Time Machine

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

115 out of 137 people found this review helpful.

MASTERFUL!!!

H G Wells has awakened the world with his art of tale through the travel of time. He is the inspiration of every time travel writer in existence today, with no exception, myself included. Along with great classics like Twenty-thousand Leagues Under the Sea, I remember t...
H G Wells has awakened the world with his art of tale through the travel of time. He is the inspiration of every time travel writer in existence today, with no exception, myself included. Along with great classics like Twenty-thousand Leagues Under the Sea, I remember the first time reading these classics. I was in awe. Though time travel, a genre given life by H G Wells is the ultimate epic sci-fi adventure. The very idea of time travel has opened the eyes of every imagination in my soul. The ramifications are endless. H G Well's Time Machine is my favorite, all time story. Even when you think of how the future looked as grim as it did thousands of years from the story-line's origination, one only needs to remember that this tale is merely one possiblity of billions that could be changed with a simple act of maybe a push of a button or even less. I believe THAT was the message Wells was revealing to us all. This is a very well written story that I highly recommend to anyone of any age or time. This very book was my biggest inspiration since I was first able to read.

posted by 159656 on October 19, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

81 out of 108 people found this review helpful.

Time Machine

this was a interesting book but i am not that interested in science. there were parts in the book that were very interesting and had a great climax. i recommend this book for someone who likes science and mystery.

posted by Anonymous on December 20, 2006

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  • Posted February 27, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    great book with a great lesson

    The Time Machine tells us of the future and how it can be drastically different than how we may predict it to be. Many people talk of flying cars and robots, but the Time Traveler sees something different. The Time Traveler is the main character in the book and has figured out how to build a time machine. When he tells this to his friends they do not believe him. To show them that it works, he ventures to the year 802,701.He arrives there and finds that humans have evolved in two different ways. There is a lower class called the Morlocks. These people are nocturnal and ape-like. They live underground and appear to be more barbaric than the Eloi. The Eloi are the upper class of people. They live similar to how we live now - in houses and above ground. Both of the species speak odd languages, so it is difficult for the Time Traveler to communicate with them. When the Morlocks steal the Time Travelers time machine, he has to get it back from them. While attempting to get it back he learns many things of the two classes, and he wonders what went wrong with the world. He makes a friend along the way named Weena, who is an Eloi. When he finally gets the time machine back he travels back to the present time, but his friends still do not believe him. The Time Traveler must go back to the future to prove it, but this time he says he will take pictures. Three years had gone by since then, and his friends still had not seen him. The major theme in this book is the problems of the current day. H.G. Wells makes the point that the gap between the upper-class and lower-class is too expansive, and if we don't do anything about it then we will one day evolve into two different species. This book was written during the Victorian times in Great Britain. I think H.G. Wells may have been relating that Communism was a safer path at the time, and he expressed his feeling about it in the book by warning people of what could happen. I disliked this book because I feel like the author could have made the book longer by telling what happened to the Time Traveler after he went back into the future and at least gave the reader an idea of what happened. It almost seemed like he didn't finish the book. On the other hand, I liked this book because it is entertaining to think about what the future could be like and all the different possibilities. I also liked it because it was paced very well, and there was the right amount of action. I think that you should read this book because it is very entertaining and it is a classic.

    25 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Wow

    Great

    5 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Enjoyed

    Interesting plot of the future, the way he interprets time was intriguing and new. Wells goes into great detail (without boring you) and really makes you visualize what hes saying. The ending i think could ve had more excitement or ended abruptly.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2012

    Best book ever

    It was interesting but good

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Its good

    I liked this book very good

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2012

    Wonderful

    What a great book

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    !

    Amazing!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    Enjoyed the book

    The first chapter was a bit slow and disjointed but I am glad I stayed with it Wells is a gifted writer who can tell a good story and make you stop and think at the same time

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Although Short, Wonderfully Entertaining.

    As soon as I finished, I only had one wish: if only it was longer. It was undeniably well written, and an awesome read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Strange

    I like this story. It ends abruptly, but a good tale overall.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2012

    Fast read

    A classic for a reason. A short and quick read, but very entertaining and hard to put down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2012

    good book

    Great book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Hi

    This book is a very good book for young ages d teachers acn use this book

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Hey

    There is this guy who writes wierd stuff like a bunch of letters so if you ever see him tell him to stop its really annoying and stop using comments to find dates im only 10 i dont want to know anything wierd

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    Interesting. A true classic

    Wells not only sends his protagonist into the future, he allows him to come back and to reflect on what might happen to humanity if we cease being humane. A great book, recommended to all.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Truely a classic.

    Although I first read this book as a teenager, it was fun to read again 50 years later. It is truly a classic, and never goes out of style. Short and easy to read. Maybe I'll read it again in another 50 years.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    Quick and interesting

    Much different than the miovie. The book has Less story and a simple plot with a better ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2010

    The Time Machine. H.G.Wells New York: Scholastic Inc. 2002. 123 pages.

    This story is about a man who builds a time machine which represents the fourth dimension to take him into the future where no one knows what will happen. Other people did not believe him, for this theory sounded so absurd.

    When he finally goes into the future, he sees the whole world's ups and downs flash right in front of him, minutes at a time. When this machine arrives to its destination, he had been confronted by shy, unintelligent, yet beautiful creatures. These creatures were not as though he would have expected to be. He had visualized them as intelligent and outgoing citizens of a cleaner planet. Later he discovered that he was actually talking to a younger, less advanced group and that he had landed in the year of 802,701. The time that he had landed in actually was cleaner, there were hardly any diseased bugs on the plants to harm then, and the water and air was also clean as well. After the time traveler discovered that he was in gargantuan trouble when his time machine disappeared. The time traveler was not prepared for this situation at all, he didn't have any weapons, flash lights, or any other source that could prepare him for another machine such as the one he had built.

    When the time machine went missing, the traveler had gone out on a search through this unfamiliar world. The only friend or familiar person was one of the beautiful creatures named Weena, whom he loved very much. Weena was a wonderful companion for the time traveler, though she was in a child-like state of mind.

    I would recommend this particular story because it shows you a different kind of theory of how the future may end up. It lets you think different about how our descendents could turn up to be. Instead of imagining the future as a fulfilling, loving, kind, and advanced world, it takes you where you may want to think differently from now on. Instead the futuristic world may be filled with, frightening, shy, cannibalistic, unintelligent creatures.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Haunting, Memorable and Cool Classic Science Fiction

    The Time Machine is more than cool, classic sci-fi. It's more than just THE original story to include a scientific rationale to time travel. It's a story that delves into the differences and injustices of class relations. It's a story that considers a burgeoning scientific revolution. And it's a story that explores evolution and the fate of mankind (at the same time as the World is still grapples with Darwin's theory).

    The story is quite simple. The Time Traveller (TTT - no name is given) creates a machine that's able to travel through time. TTT demonstrates, in miniature, how the machine works and then travels himself, in full scale, 800,000 years into the future. The narration is handled by The Writer (also no name is given) who witnesses the miniature demonstration and is present when TTT returns from his trip to the future.

    TTT finds himself in a future inhabitated by the child-like Eloi living a vegetarian and almost Luddite existence. The Eloi are innocent, fun-loving, sympathetic simpletons. When his time machine disappears, TTT explores this future land and ultimately discovers the Eloi's underground-dwelling symbiotic cousins - the Morlocks. Symbollically, the Eloi serve the role of aristocracy, patrician, or white collar; while the Morlocks serve the role as commonor, plebian, proletariat or blue collar. The Morlocks are carnivores (you can guess where they get their meat), and industrial, who can only see in the dark and are afraid of fire and the light.

    After battle the Morlocks and losing his one Eloi friend, Weena, TTT recovers his Time Machine and launches himself further into the future.

    The image of a desolate, grim far-future inhabited only by large crab-like creatures is as haunting and memorable to me as an adult as it was when I first read it 20+ years ago. The Signet edition of The Time Machine includes one additional future vignette that was edited out of the definitive edition of the story. This additional scene precedes TTT's visit to the crab-beach. He finds what he believes to be the last vestiges of humanity having taken the shape of large grey formless rabbits who are hunted by enormous caterpillars. These few additional pages evoke the same creepiness as the beach crabs and are a nice complement to the original story.

    TTT relates his journey at a dinner party at his home. We view his adventure and discourse through The Writer's detailed account of TTT's return. English society is represented at the dinner party and, naturally, nobody quite believes the tale.

    Modern scifi stalwart Greg Bear writes an introduction to the Signet addition and provides informative context to the story, it's place in writing history, and background on H.G. Wells as well as his place in the authorial pantheon.

    If you've never read The Time Machine before, I strongly recommend you jump into this turn of the 19th Century classic. It's a little soft by modern comparison, but it's the original upon which so much contemporary scifi is based.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2006

    The Time Machine

    I think Time Machine is a great book. It teaches you not to look at everything in such a stereotypical way, to expand your mind, and it gives you many 'what if' thoughts after you read the book. There were some parts of the book that was confusing but everything else made we want to read more and find out what was going to happen next, especially towards the end. All the open discussion and statments in the book allows your brain to wonder why the Time Traveller did or said certain things and also why the author did certain things throughout the book?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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