Customer Reviews for

The Tragedy Paper

Average Rating 4.5
( 57 )
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(33)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

This book...wow, I hardly know where to begin. First of all, I r

This book...wow, I hardly know where to begin. First of all, I rarely read books where the narrator is a young man. This isn't by choice - it just seems to happen that way. Being able to get into the minds of two young men, who both suffer the tragedy of a common event,...
This book...wow, I hardly know where to begin. First of all, I rarely read books where the narrator is a young man. This isn't by choice - it just seems to happen that way. Being able to get into the minds of two young men, who both suffer the tragedy of a common event, was enlightening.




Tim, one of the narrators of this story, is an albino who has recently undergone drastic change in his life. Meeting Vanessa and seemingly being included at his new school provides Tim with a feeling he has always longed for...belonging. And isn't this a feeling we all long for in our lives? I believe it's an element of human nature. And I believe that teenagers in particular suffer from this desire to belong, to be included, to fit in. For some, the desire is so strong they will do just about anything. Tim, who's need to fit in was probably much stronger seeing as he'd always been the outsider, did push his limits in order to achieve that goal...he indulged his tragic flaw as it were, to his own detriment.




Duncan, the second of the two narrators of our story, was witness to Tim's downfall and felt a certain degree of culpability. In fact, he seemed to be unable to move past his guilt. He spent the bulk of his senior year trying to come to terms with his perceived role in Tim's tragedy, trying not to make the same mistakes Tim has related to him, and to correlate Tim's story in a tangible way using his own Tragedy Paper.




I liked the use of the Tragedy Paper as the backdrop for this novel. Tragedy, both in the literal sense and in the literary sense, are combined to create a profound story. I also appreciated the use of Shakespearean names - Duncan and Tim Macbeth - both from Macbeth, one of Shakespeare's tragedies is telling. Duncan, just like King Duncan, is sensitive and insightful. Tim Macbeth is similar to Macbeth in his inability to truly trust along with his anxiety, both of which he suffers because he can't believe he'd ever be accepted because of being an albino. 




I did feel a tiny bit of a letdown once all was revealed. It seemed a bit melodramatic that Duncan would have had such a visceral reaction to the incident in light of his actions. However, the story is also very insightful, with Duncan learning much from Tim's revelations. Overall, this was a very engaging read.

posted by BookwormBrandee on January 8, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Rating: 3.5 The Low Down: Duncan has returned for his senior

Rating: 3.5




The Low Down: Duncan has returned for his senior year at The Irving School. A school with many traditions, one is where the previous year’s seniors “pass” their rooms on to the new seniors. They are left a “treasure” as well, which can be anything from b...
Rating: 3.5




The Low Down: Duncan has returned for his senior year at The Irving School. A school with many traditions, one is where the previous year’s seniors “pass” their rooms on to the new seniors. They are left a “treasure” as well, which can be anything from books to liquor to Yankees tickets. Much to his dismay, Duncan gets the room that no one wants - it’s small and has a tiny window. His bequest: a stack of CDs made by the room’s previous occupant, Tim Macbeth. Thinking they contain music, he starts to play the first one. It is Tim telling the story that Duncan doesn’t want to think about; the actual tragedy that took place at the end of the previous year. One that Duncan witnessed.




Tim transferred to Irving after Christmas break during his senior year. He didn’t have any friends at his previous school, really. Tim’s an albino, and he generally keeps his head down. He finds a place where he feels safe and he “tucks in,” as he says. But when his flight to New York City is cancelled because of snow, and he’s stuck staying overnight, he’s surprised that he agrees to allow a fellow passenger, a girl about his age, to stay in his room at the sold-out hotel. They go outside and build an igloo in the snow and have a snowball fight. They talk. They eat room service. He’s never enjoyed himself more. But when he finds out that this girl, Vanessa, attends Irving and she has a boyfriend there, he decides not to tell her that he’s headed there as well. The next day, as they travel on different flights, he texts his destination to her. She texts back one word: “Good.”




Best Thang ‘Bout It: A well-crafted story, I liked the Shakespeare references, this boy who knew he would always be judged by his appearance, and  the girl stuck in a relationship. The means of telling of the story was clever, one that allowed both Tim’s and Duncan’s tales to be told simultaneously. The story idea was fresh as well.




I’m Cranky Because: As present as all the elements were, I never felt that the story jelled for me. It wasn’t from a lack of a foundation that it didn’t crystallize either; there were threads throughout that were subtle yet visible that led to the end and came together nicely. We get to know Tim very well, but not really anyone else with the same amount of depth. I did not feel connected with or moved by most of them. I also thought the climax of the story was rushed which made it rather anti-climactic. There was so much time spent trying to discover what happened, then it finally happened, then book was over.




Should You?: When all is said and done, It is absolutely worth reading.




The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan was published on January 8, 2013 by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers.




Genre: Young Adult Fiction Contemporary
Ages: 12 and up
You Might Want to Know: Minor references to underage drinking.

posted by InkandPage on January 9, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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