Customer Reviews for

The Treachery of Beautiful Things

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

On the B&N site, it categorizes it for ages 9-12, but it's s

On the B&N site, it categorizes it for ages 9-12, but it's shelved - and rightly so - in the Teen section. It's a disturbingly beautiful look at the world of Faerie and kids today wno know nothing of fairy tales but the Disney versions might have their minds blown....
On the B&N site, it categorizes it for ages 9-12, but it's shelved - and rightly so - in the Teen section. It's a disturbingly beautiful look at the world of Faerie and kids today wno know nothing of fairy tales but the Disney versions might have their minds blown. Look at Tinkerbell...she pops up in cartoons and toys as this sweet sprite, but in the J.M. Barrie original, she and Tiger Lily are mean as snakes because of jealousy. But that is the Faerie kingdom in a nutshell - beauty on the surface, but mischief and deadly spite underneath.

Long introduces us to Jenny and Tom in the prologue where the 10 and 14 year old siblings walk home through the forest. Tom is playing his flute, his prodigious talent marking him as someone special to his parents and teachers. No one asks him if this is what he chooses for himself. Jenny is a voracious reader and loves Tom's gift for the music itself, not for where his talent will take him. But Jenny is nervous of the woods, sensing ...something. So when the trees and the earth itself come alive and swallow her brother whole in front of her, Jenny is left with a feeling of survivor's guilt and the stamp of "crazy" when she keeps trying to tell people what really happened to her brother.

Seven years pass and Jenny has come home from boarding school on a short stay before she heads off to university in Scotland. She visits Branley Copse on a pilgrimage to say goodbye to her brother, hoping for some closure. What she finds instead is the sound of his distinctive flute, his curses when he flubs a note, and so she plunges deep into the woods that devoured her brother...and finds a whole new world.

Ms. Long does a divine job of evoking the gloriously verdant beauty of the woods, the evanescent fluttering of elven wings, and the treacherous two-faced world of the fey. Nothing is as it seems, and no one is to be trusted. All Jenny wants is to find her brother and bring him home, not realizing that 7 years under the thrall of Queen Titania has changed him into someone she hardly recognizes. Her only help comes from Jack of the Forest, a guardian of the woods whose ties to both Titania and King Oberon mean that his loyalty to her quest might be, well, questionable. Throw in Puck, half man, half goat, and wholly loyal only to himself. As champions, they appear to be lacking. But Jenny's innocence and desire to help other denizens of the woods even as she looks for Tom endear her to the creatures of the forest. Yet in the world of Faerie, that kind of innocence is only valuable as a sacrifice; and as Jenny gets closer to finding her brother and begins to examine her feelings for Jack, she'll have to decide just how much she's willing to give up to save the ones she loves.

posted by romancemistress on September 1, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

The Treachery of Beautiful Things was a beautifully written, tho

The Treachery of Beautiful Things was a beautifully written, though complex, story of the fae of the old, dark fairly tales. In a few ways, I adored it. But in many respects, I was left agitated and lost.

Let me begin with what I liked about Treachery. I enjoyed the r...
The Treachery of Beautiful Things was a beautifully written, though complex, story of the fae of the old, dark fairly tales. In a few ways, I adored it. But in many respects, I was left agitated and lost.

Let me begin with what I liked about Treachery. I enjoyed the romantic, charming tone of Long's writing. The narrative was vividly detailed. I could picture the Realm, it's forest, creatures, and magic. I also enjoyed the character of Jack, who surprisingly dominated the story. I expected Treachery to be Jenny's story, but I felt a stronger connection and empathy for Jack. He was by turns sexy in "I'm complicated and dark" way, solemn and mysterious. He is torn between his oaths, his duty, his hopes. He is ruled by two opposing personalities. Without Jack, Treachery would have lost most of it's appeal.

So I'm sure you're dying to know how I felt about the main character, Jenny. My feelings for Jenny can be described best as "meh". I didn't hate her; I didn't love her. There were times when she was really brave, really smart. She didn't back down from her quest, regardless the personal cost. But then, she was so blind sometimes. I get it, characters make mistakes. I happen to love flawed characters. But I have a pet peeve when it comes to relationships, real or fictional: If a guy/girl tells you they are bad news, that they will get you hurt, maimed or your heart eaten, LISTEN TO THEM. Just do it. And I know, this is a fantasy, but when the heroine gets her panties in a twist after realizing that the guy who told her he was dangerous, actually meant what he was saying, well, that just grinds my gears. So most of the time, I just wanted the story to turn it's focus back to Jack. Deep, calming breath...

The actual story was interesting. I have read several stories about the fae and have enjoyed them. But in reading Treachery, I mostly felt lost. I knew who Oberon, Titania, Mab and Puck were (b/c I've read the Iron Fey series. Holla!). And I sort of understood who was working with/against whom. I didn't understand a lot of the long-standing dynamics of the Realm. It seemed that an extensive knowledge of the old faerie tales was needed to fully understand what was happening. There were underlying issues that seemed like they were common knowledge about the fae, that I didn't understand. Maybe not, though. Maybe it's just me and I've sniffed too much rubber cement in my time and it's coming back to haunt me. I would love to hear from someone who has read this to verify that yes, it is a bit confusing, or no, I just didn't read it right.

Overall, I can say The Treachery of Beautiful Things is a story that I both liked and disliked. I never felt as if I couldn't finish it, but I had to work hard to keep the details straight. I believe that I'm likely in the minority in my opinion of the book. With it's lush writing and dark charm, The Treachery of Beautiful Things will appeal to fans of dark faery tales.

posted by Andreat78 on September 4, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted September 4, 2012

    The Treachery of Beautiful Things was a beautifully written, tho

    The Treachery of Beautiful Things was a beautifully written, though complex, story of the fae of the old, dark fairly tales. In a few ways, I adored it. But in many respects, I was left agitated and lost.

    Let me begin with what I liked about Treachery. I enjoyed the romantic, charming tone of Long's writing. The narrative was vividly detailed. I could picture the Realm, it's forest, creatures, and magic. I also enjoyed the character of Jack, who surprisingly dominated the story. I expected Treachery to be Jenny's story, but I felt a stronger connection and empathy for Jack. He was by turns sexy in "I'm complicated and dark" way, solemn and mysterious. He is torn between his oaths, his duty, his hopes. He is ruled by two opposing personalities. Without Jack, Treachery would have lost most of it's appeal.

    So I'm sure you're dying to know how I felt about the main character, Jenny. My feelings for Jenny can be described best as "meh". I didn't hate her; I didn't love her. There were times when she was really brave, really smart. She didn't back down from her quest, regardless the personal cost. But then, she was so blind sometimes. I get it, characters make mistakes. I happen to love flawed characters. But I have a pet peeve when it comes to relationships, real or fictional: If a guy/girl tells you they are bad news, that they will get you hurt, maimed or your heart eaten, LISTEN TO THEM. Just do it. And I know, this is a fantasy, but when the heroine gets her panties in a twist after realizing that the guy who told her he was dangerous, actually meant what he was saying, well, that just grinds my gears. So most of the time, I just wanted the story to turn it's focus back to Jack. Deep, calming breath...

    The actual story was interesting. I have read several stories about the fae and have enjoyed them. But in reading Treachery, I mostly felt lost. I knew who Oberon, Titania, Mab and Puck were (b/c I've read the Iron Fey series. Holla!). And I sort of understood who was working with/against whom. I didn't understand a lot of the long-standing dynamics of the Realm. It seemed that an extensive knowledge of the old faerie tales was needed to fully understand what was happening. There were underlying issues that seemed like they were common knowledge about the fae, that I didn't understand. Maybe not, though. Maybe it's just me and I've sniffed too much rubber cement in my time and it's coming back to haunt me. I would love to hear from someone who has read this to verify that yes, it is a bit confusing, or no, I just didn't read it right.

    Overall, I can say The Treachery of Beautiful Things is a story that I both liked and disliked. I never felt as if I couldn't finish it, but I had to work hard to keep the details straight. I believe that I'm likely in the minority in my opinion of the book. With it's lush writing and dark charm, The Treachery of Beautiful Things will appeal to fans of dark faery tales.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Treachery of Beautiful Things started of as a very interesti

    The Treachery of Beautiful Things started of as a very interesting book.
    I started it with no expectations what so ever, and I wasn't even sure I
    was going to enjoy it. The main protagonist, Jenny, had a brother who
    was swollen by a tree seven years ago. Jenny's brother, Tom, can no
    longer be found anywhere. No one believe Jenny, when she told them that
    Tom was swollen by a tree. She was only ten, and they thought she was
    making it all up. Jenny went to psychiatrists and doctors, and nothing
    helped. People told her she was hallucinating, and imagining things, but
    she was sure about what she saw. One day, she walks by the same forest,
    and hears her brother's flute playing. She can notice her brother's
    playing anywhere, and she was sure it was him. She ran into the forest,
    until she was lost. Lost into the realm. It was very interesting to find
    out that Jenny got sucked into the magical world. Ruth Frances Long was
    really good at describing the magical world, because I really found
    myself smiling at her beautiful descriptions. It felt like I was reading
    a fairytale. Which wasn't boring, but very magical. When Jane is there,
    she meets Jack. Jack o' the Forest. Jack is determined to send her back
    to her help, and gets his friends to take care of her. Things happen,
    nasty things, and that's when the story starts evolving. Jenny is a very
    strong character, and that made me like her a lot. Though sometimes she
    got a bit reckless, not caring about whatever would happen to her just
    to find her brother. The romance between Jenny and Jack was simple. It
    didn't feel heavy, and I guess I liked it that way. While reading, some
    details in the book were confusing to understand. At that point, through
    the middle of the book, the Realm started to become confusing for me to
    imagine. At first it was very mystical, but then I guess there was too
    much detail. Sometimes, something that would have been described in one
    paragraph, took one page. That had me skimming through the lines, and
    just wanting to read the dialogue. I guess that's when the book started
    to bore me a bit. It took too much time for things to get to the point,
    and that made me kind of frustrated as well. Into the ending of the
    book, I really liked it! It did get more interesting, and I hoped it was
    interesting through all the book. Overall, it was a good book to read.
    I wasn't disappointed or shocked, because it was fine. It wasn't
    entirely boring or entirely interesting either. Though I did close the
    book with a smile on my face, because I though the ending was just too
    adorable! It wasn't what I was expecting at all, and I guess that made
    me like the book a bit more. I would recommend this to all young adult
    paranormal readers. A different intake in paranormal creatures.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1