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The Truth about the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do about It

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2004

    former NEJM editor 's revolutionary manifesto ROCKS!

    Dr. Marcia Angell puts the full punch of her 20 years as New England Journal of Medicine editor behind this riveting and hard-hitting analysis of all that has gone wrong (and why) with the U.S. pharmaceutical industry over the past 20-odd years. Tracing the origins of this deleterious detour to a rash of pharma friendly legislation during the Reagan years (and continuing through both the Clinton and Bush 43 administrations), her tour-de-force analysis combines extensive research and illuminating case studies with an impassioned fervor that cannot fail to leave you asking, 'Where do I sign up?' In the final two chapters she summarizes both the problems we're up against as well as her prescriptions for reform. Several of them, such as her call to repeal both the 1992 Prescription Drug User Fee Act and the 2003 Medicare reform bill, are certain to ruffle more than a few feathers. For anyone who is troubled by the out of control greed, corruption and hypocrisy of this vital industry, Angell's book is a user's guide, a call to arms and a must read all in one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 19, 2010

    A must read for anyone taking non-generic RX medications

    This book is very interesting and informative for anyone who is curious about the pharmaceutical industry and the back room process of drug development and marketing!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2009

    A must read for Physicians and anyone involved in patient care

    An eye opening account into one of the most powerful industries in America. Suffice it to say that they do not necessarily have the patients best intrest at heart. Think pill-pushing Wall Street mentality. Nuff said.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2007

    A reviewer

    This is one of the best books I've ever read. Dr. Angell is a more than qualified author that does an excellent job of going through all the problems that currently exist with drug companies. I am a first year medical student and I discuss the points Dr. Angell makes with my professors or other medical students anytime I get a chance. This book has absolutely changed how I perceive the drug companies, and how I will run my practice when I become a practicing physician. While I think it is most important for physicians to read this book I think it would be very beneficial for everyone to read it as well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2007

    A reviewer

    Dr. Angell seems to have a serious axe to grind in writing this book, but then again nearly everyone who writes a book has an axe to grind to some degree. She's right that the large drug companies have become heavily involved in marketing, their drugs are very highly priced in the United States, and they do produce many 'me-too' drugs. To some degree, though, this is par for the course for any big company that is trying to protect its interests in a highly competitive market. It may be that the industry will behave like this indefinitely if no one intervenes, or it could be that after all of the 'low hanging fruit' drugs, such as SSRIs, are created and their patents run their course, fewer big drug companies will be able to survive. We may be witnessing something like the end of the dot.com boom. In either case, Dr. Angell's book is well researched and loaded with facts and examples. It's probably good for everyone to hear her ideas.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2004

    Does Random House Uitlize Peer Review?

    The big pharma companies are easy to beat up on. Why? most of us pay out of pocket for some or most of these services. Docs escape a critical eye because we as a society do not worry about wasting this limited resource as insurance picks up the tab. Hell, we don't even complain about sitting on hold for an hour or more for a 10 min. appointmnet. I did medicinal chemistry research for my PhD and now teach organic chemistry and medicinal chemistry at a liberal arts college in NY. I read this book expecting balance - I was mistaken. The public's general chemophobia and scientific illiteracy is easy to parlay into a revolt against a chemical based industry which has done more to improve the quality and longevity of life as any. I have a few questions and requests for the good doctor. 1.How may new drugs have Stanford, MIT, Caltech and the Ivy's brought to market in the last 50 years? (or NIH for that matter). 2. Is it not somewhat satisfying that an economic superpower, who otherwise brings up the rear as far as per capita expenditures on third world development and aidis concerned, can at least contribute by paying what the market will bear for pharmaceuticals? 3. There are many valid concerns given voice in your book. Why not work behind the scenes and with your compatriots in the medical profession to rectify these and advance the public welfare, rather than resorting to hyperbole and fear to sell books? 4. Please actually speak with some patients who have had their lives transformed by advances in psychopharmacoligical agents. You exude a Ludite-like disdain for this area of medicine. 5. Look again at the reasons for Phase 4 testing and post market surveillence. Hopefully one day genomics will allow a quick and economical way of finding the 1 in 500,000 patients who are endanger of an untoward effect associated with use of a pharmaceutical. Until then, this is the only option available.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2010

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