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The Upstairs Room

Average Rating 4.5
( 83 )
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5 Star

(53)

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(15)

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(10)

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(5)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Non-graphic enough for kids to read, but a tale to keep those of all ages interested!

I read this book in my Language Arts class thinking it would be an easy A and that it'd be mediocre at worst. Boy, was I wrong! A lovely tale written from a child's point of view and just an amazing book in general. The epilogue really was the cherry on top, and I recom...
I read this book in my Language Arts class thinking it would be an easy A and that it'd be mediocre at worst. Boy, was I wrong! A lovely tale written from a child's point of view and just an amazing book in general. The epilogue really was the cherry on top, and I recommend it to all who enjoyed the movie "La Vita e Bella (Life Is Beautiful)".

posted by Horrid-Hazuki on April 26, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Tasha

77

posted by Anonymous on March 4, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    Great story...

    Format sometimes unclear

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    In the part of the marketplace where flowers had been sold twic

    In the part of the marketplace where flowers had been sold twice a week - tulips in the spring, roses in the summer - stood German tanks and German soldiers. Annie de Leeuw was eight years old in 1940 when the Germans attacked Holland and marched into the town of Winterswijk where she lived. She was Jewish and in great danger of being captured by the invaders. She and her sister, Sini, had to leave their father and older sister, Rachel. Their mother was hospitalized due to daily migraines, and she refused to leave Holland and move to America to get away from Hitler and the Nazis like her husband wanted. Sini and Annie had to go into hiding in the upstairs room of a remote farmhouse to be safe.

    This book is about a little girl named Rachel who has an ill mother, two sisters, and a father who wants to get out of Holland to move to America and get away from Hitler because they are Jews. The author, Johanna Reiss, wrote this book because she was actually a part of the Leeuw family and felt like it was her job to tell the story of her past ancestors, and bring their story to the generation we now are in. This content of this book would be good for children eleven and up to read because of some of the language and curse words in the story because there is a certain quote near the beginning that says, “Not me. At night I listen to a Dutch broadcast from England. That’s for the real news. Those damn newspapers never tell you a damn thing. Nothing but lies.” I don’t think language like this is appropriate for children any younger than eleven or twelve.

    The writer of this book certainly put a lot of thought and effort into telling this story of the descendants in her family. She carefully considered the content of the book, and that’s why millions of people have read it. There are many Jewish and German words throughout the story, but other than those words, the statements are quite easy to understand and there is a clear meaning. You can always tell who is speaking, and I would say that I can easily tell what was happening. The only person we can really identify with is Johan; at least I think so. A comment from this story, made by him that causes us to be able to identify with him is when he says, “That’s all you women ever tell me. Get up, Johan. Go milk to cows, Johan. Feed the pigs, Johan. Why don’t you get up too, eh, and help me?” We can identify with this because married men are always talking about how much their wife nags them, and their wife always talks about how lazy the men are!

    Having to hide in the upstairs room of a farmhouse was definitely a challenge for the Leeuw sisters, but it was the only place they knew was safe. It tells the full story in detail and gives descriptions of each character throughout the story. The really great thing about this, is readers will enjoy this dangerous adventure and find it is something written just for them that they can get in to!



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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2014

    This book gives an excellent idea, on the level of daily experie

    This book gives an excellent idea, on the level of daily experience, of what it was like for Jewish people to find themselves needing to hide among Gentiles in Holland during the Holocaust, and what it was like for ordinary but caring people to risk their lives hiding them too.  Some of the reviews I have read say that this book is on the boring side, but I do not agree.  It is a fascinating look at the experiences of one family and two girls, and in particular the author, at a time when they were in effect imprisoned but hoping, no matter how hard it was to wait for the long months, weeks, days, hours, and minutes, to pass, that they wouldn't be discovered.  This book truly lets you step a little bit into their shoes, and a reader with imagination will find this an absorbing challenge.  However, I read this book to share with my fifth grade son, but I found I could not recommend it because of all the bad language in it.  Most particularly bothersome for me were the many vain uses of the name of God, something that for Jewish people who hold to their faith is a very serious matter indeed.  I was surprised to find it here, even if it was reflective of the reality of the author's experience. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    Is this a kid friendly book?

    Please answer quikly

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2004

    Our Only May Amelia

    Being the only girl of 9 kids in your family is not what you would call easy. The story takes place in 1899. May Amelia Jackson lives in Nasel, Washington where she constantly gets in trouble, whether it is being chased up a tree by a bear or coming face to face with a cougar she always manages a way to ecscape narrowly. She has to learn to understand her father and face Grandmother Patience whose cane is known to be hurtful. May Amelia describes her sorrows and adventures much throughout the story, that is what makes it interesting. I liked how May could make you feel happy or sad for her within moments, it felt as though I was a character in the book. I did not like how May just always talked about herself and did not thoroughly explain topics that were brought up. Overall the book was not all that bad. It got you into the book at times but there was a point where you could just actually put the book down and stop reading.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2003

    Decent Book

    The Book, The Upstairs Room, is about an 8 year old jewish girl in the year 1940 in Holland when the Germans are taking over during WWII. Her name is Annie, and she lives with her older sister, Sini, her mom and her dad. They are forced to split up and go into hiding by 1942, Annie and Sini both go to stay with a gentile family who live on a farm in Winterswijik, Holland. Their mother stays in a hostpitle because she is sick and their father goes to stay with another family. Annie and Sini stay in an upstairs room for almost 2 years and never go outside except one or two occasions, annie must walk back in forwth in the room to get exercise to stay healthy. Their are a few close calls with German soldiers searching houses so they build a hiding spot in a closet for the kids to go to if they need to which they do a few times. I found this book to be fairly informative about the halocaust and gave you a good idea at what they had to go through. If you like books on the holacaust or WWII then you will like this book, it is pretty easy reading. The author did a good job of putting you in the characters shoes and showing you what it was really like. I liked it and recomend it to all ages. This book isn't as dramatic or brutal as other books i've read on the holacaust. Read this book its a decent book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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