Customer Reviews for

The Woman in White (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 3.5
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(34)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Really Amazing

A really good book that has interesting characters and strong plot line,it manages to
give you info slowly but surely and then POW! it all makes sense! Amazingly up to date and relevant even in this day and age,it's also great for re-reading.

posted by fearlessgirl on January 29, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Beautiful...Need to have Time to Kill to Read

This book had a great plot and was beautifully written. However, it seems to take a while for the story to pick up and when it does take off you feel as though you are going in circles. The best was the end since you moved quick, got to the point, and it is where all ...
This book had a great plot and was beautifully written. However, it seems to take a while for the story to pick up and when it does take off you feel as though you are going in circles. The best was the end since you moved quick, got to the point, and it is where all the interesting aspects of the plot come out. I would recommend this if you have time to kill but if not you might want to pick up another book.

posted by Tired_of_Being_Sorry on June 27, 2010

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  • Posted March 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Well worth the investment of time.

    At 635 pages, Wilkie Collins' "The Woman in White" is an investment of time. It is, however, an investment worth making. Originally published in book form in 1860, this classic mystery combines intrigue, suspense and just a touch of insanity. Each section is narrated by a different character, so the tone and voice are constantly changing. This is typical in mystery writing today, but it was quite revolutionary in the 19th century. This construction adds an almost trial-like flavor to the mystery as each person's "testimony" adds pieces to the overall puzzle.

    There are plenty of twists and turns, both in the plot and in the characters. Not everyone is what they seem to be and that makes it all very thrilling.

    This is not a "sit at the beach" book, but more of a "sit by the fire on a rainy day" book. But, after the first few pages hook you, you'll be wishing for rain.

    12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A nice surprise

    I was pretty impressed with this book. It is one of the most interesting older books that I have ever read. It kept my attention the whole way through. The characters were very in depth. A few things bothered me about this book, but mostly, it was enjoyable and different!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2008

    A reviewer

    Even though this was written in 1859 it almost reads like a contemporary novel. I love the way he changes the character giving the narrative. A very well written suspense mystery novel--I am pleasantly surprised.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 25, 2010

    Great Read

    I really loved this book. It does take a while to get into the story, but I think that is the case with many books. However, sometimes the slowest starters turn out to be the most amazing. It may start slow but all of sudden you find yourself hanging on each word, anticipating the next move of the characters. I loved, unlike more modern mystery/suspense novels, that the actions of these characters is much more subtle due to the time period the story is set. It gives another layer of complexity that really took hold of me while I read it. I gave it four stars, instead of five, because yes it is extremely long. I felt that the ending was dragged on a bit. I found myself just rushing through the pages to have it done, and not because I felt compelled to turn the page in relation to the plot. However, the plot for 98% of the book, did keep my heart pounding, my mind spinning, and my fingers aching to turn the pages. A great read, even with the negative of being increasingly long.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2013

    Highly Recommended

    I am trying to go back and read some of the classics I missed during my younger years. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Wilkie Collins had a way of grabbing you into his story. This book is intriguing, well written and most enjoyable. I found the characters of the players to be interesting as well as annoying in some cases; but definitely vivid.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2013

    Wilkie Collins is always worth a read

    I love Victorian, journal-entry, and stories told in letters, epistles, etc. format. Dracula, by Bram Stoker, and The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins are great examples of the genre.

    I read The Moonstone decades ago and loved it, and finally got around to reading Wilkie's Woman In White. Very good. I thought it got bogged down a bit about one-third to half-way through, but the last two-fifths of the novel were page-turners.

    The book is basically about two women who greatly resemble one-another. The wealthy one of the two has the misfortune to marry Sir percival Glyde, an English nobleman who wants only her inheritance, and who uses the resemblance between the two women to gain it.

    The book is worth reading just to be introduced to the character of Count Fosco, an Italian nobleman and one of the most remarkable villians I've ever encountered in a novel. Fosco is the brains of the group, and he and his devoted wife aid Glyde in his evil derrings-do with great style and panache.

    There is a heroic art-instructor in shining amour, as well as a half-sister of the hapless heiress who are on her side. There are plenty of twists and turns, and enough red herrings in the tale to keep anyone interested in the story.

    I'm not crazy about romance novels, but make exceptions for good a Gothic romance and this one fits the bill excellently. The Woman in Whit is well written and a superb mystery thriller.

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  • Posted April 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Yearning to Read Review

    Walter Hartright, one of the main characters in The Woman in White, is one of those unlikely heroes who you just cannot help but fall in love with. Art is his passion, and he's a rather quiet gentleman with kindness for everyone. However, as the story continues on, Walter shows intense courage, passion, and love in the events that change his life forever.

    This book was writting differently than the majority of books. As the mystery unfolds, each character gives one or more account of what they have seen, heard, and/or carefully observed. (So when the first account comes to an end, don't be shocked.) This way of presenting a story really works to convey the suspense - and danger - of the situations the characters are in. It gives the characters life, more personality.

    I'm not going to give a synopsis. When I read the synopsis on the back of the copy I bought, it gave me a completely different idea of what the story was going to be like than what it actually was. (That frustrates me immensely.) All I can say, besides, "Go read this book!", is that it is full of adventure, intrique, romance and mystery. It is light and it is dark; it is fast-paced and it is emotional. I never lost interest. When I was done with it, I was so glad I had read it. It truly is a classic.

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  • Posted February 14, 2011

    Don't want to put it down!

    It's a very long read but well worth the investment of your time.

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  • Posted January 30, 2011

    Recommend...

    I really had mixed feelings about this book but, by the end I wound up liking it a lot! Definitely worth a read.

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  • Posted January 13, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    One of Wilkie Collins' Best!

    The plot moved well and I was always waiting and surpised for what happened next. Beautifully written, as would be expected of Collins. However, this seems to be one of his more reachable novels. A little bit of everything seems to be found in this book. It seems long and a bit daunting, but it's very worth it!

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  • Posted October 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    One of the First & Finest Mystery Novels

    "The Woman in White" by Wilkie Collins was published as a newspaper serial in 1859. In 1860 a collected edition of the chapters was published in book form. The fictional story is considered to be one of the first mystery novels, as well as one of the finest.

    Walter Hartright, a drawing teacher, is hired to teach the beautiful Laura Fairlie and her half-sister Marian Halcombe. Laura is a weak creature, heir to the family fortune while Marian is a strong minded individual. Soon Walter and Laura fall in love, however Laura has already promised Sir Percival her hand in marriage. Soon it becomes clear that Sir Percival has money problems and has his eye on Laura's money. Not a man of honor, Sir Percival and his friend, Count Fosco, plan to get their hands on the treasure pot.

    When Walter and Marian realize that Laura's life is in danger, the two uncover the dastardly scheme in an attempt to rescue the young bride. Throughout the book, a mysterious lady in white wanders in and out of the story, lonely, dejected and desperate to meet with Laura.

    Even though this is a Victorian novel, it is still gripping, engaging and a page turner. The characters created by Collins are three dimensional, vivid, intelligent, thought provoking and sometimes hilarious even by today's standards. The story is not told in a straight narrative form, but rather in a series of letters, first hand accounts, diaries and dispositions by the main characters, as well as some supporting characters.

    Since this novel was first serialized, every chapter ends with a twist to keep the readers coming back, that is not to say that there aren't many twists in the chapters themselves. As a detective novel, the narrative is faithful to the art of investigation. Walter Hartright, the one who is doing the investigation, doesn't only talk to witnesses, but also minor characters who can give him background on those he is investigating.

    However, "The Woman in White" is not a only a mystery but also a Gothic romance where a man and woman give up almost everything to be together. The author moves the story precisely, gracefully and with wonderful prose and a narrative style which reminded me of Charles Dickens. The plot is complex, twisted engaging yet realistic and easy to digest.

    One of the most wonderful things about this book is the fantastic supporting cast. Count Fosco, the main villain, is a Victorian Tony Soprano, with the same charm, body type and villainous and cunning initiatives. Frederick Fairlie, an effeminate hypochondriac, had me laughing out loud, as well as the first several appearances of the Italian Professor Pesca.

    For more book reviews please visit ManOfLaBook dot com

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