BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

The Woman with the Alabaster Jar: Mary Magdalen and the Holy Grail

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2003

    The lesson of the 'anointment'

    'Annew' (in the previous posting) is right on about the significance of the book and the identity of the anointing woman. The woman's anonymity is highly significant: she becomes 'any woman.' The incident is unfortunately overshadowed by one of the greatest 'quotes out of context' in all history: 'The poor you always have with you.' The mean-spirited turn it upside down: 'There will always be poor people; forget about 'em.' In context I hear Jesus saying: 'We're not bean-counters or rule-book polishers here. You can continue taking care of the poor after I'm dead and gone. This woman has offered me a generous gift. It's an act of free will and sacrifice. That is what we're all about; never forget it.' Like the disciples on so many occasions, readers are in the position of students whose misconceptions Jesus overturns.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2000

    Sound research and astounding revelations, mystic connections

    I was amazed to see that other reviewers had given this great book four star reviews. My copy was read ragged by friends who ultimately had to have their own copy. She makes amazing connections that have long been ignored and presents them in clear, understandable form. It all makes sense now! Thank you Margaret Starbird.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 7, 2013

    A Sensible Approach to an Alternative View

    "The Woman with the Alabaster Jar," by Margaret Starbird is well researched yet written in a way that is easy to follow and understand. It's amazing the questions she asks. It inspired me to ask and to check it out. This isn't a dry academic work, but a very lively and poetic piece of literature that makes a lot of sense.

    For a long time, I have seen the Divine only as a masculine figure, not in a feminine light. I wanted to relate to a "goddess," I thought I would have to leave the Judeo/Christian traditions and go somewhere else. Mrs. Starbird here shows that leaving my childhood spirituality is no longer necessary, that Christians (and by extension, Jews; because Mary Magdalene is Jewish) can have a feminine side to Divinity. The way this book approaches this makes the whole idea plausible.

    I didn't grow up with positive male role models, so it is hard for me to relate to a male "God" without feeling judged and a recipient of wrath. I could not relate to anyone who abandons or abuses, not that God does, but that is the typical behavior of the male role models I have had growing up. As soon as I was able to see God as a "grandmother" figure, that changed. I can see and feel unconditional love and as a result, my spirituality blossomed.

    Some may not agree with the conclusions that Starbird has come up with, but that is okay. I see the possibilities and I don't have to leave my intelligence outside. Once I am able to have an open mind, and to see for myself, giving this argument a fair chance, I am able to give Christianity another look. Instead of exiting, I re-entered the spirituality of my childhood. This is what this book gave me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    It's the alabaster jar.

    The issue isn't Mary's identity. It's about the powerful significance of her actions in that time and place and culture. Margaret Starbird dared to asked different questions than the Baltimore Catechism--and seek answers wherever the journey took her. Whether you come to the same conclusions or different ones than the author, you will be asking different kinds of questions after reading this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2009

    Intriguing, thought provoking, and a good read

    Anyone interested in learning more about the sacred feminine and how this idea has faired throughout history will enjoy this book. Her research seems to be extensive and she puts together some compelling arguments. It will make you think and if you are female - possibly make you a little sad for opportunities lost.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2007

    Exellent source

    This book is a well researched credible source. An interesting look at our beliefs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2006

    Topical, No Depth

    The author makes some interesting assertions and does a good job of writing at the average person's level, which means this is not a book full of esoteric references and untranslated phrases in Latin or other languages. However, I think in her quest to make it easy to understand, she dumbed down the topic and made some unsubstantiated assertions as well as made references to some incredible deductive leaps that were made by some other 'quack' theologians. I think most educated people would agree that Christianity borrows extensively from pagan religions (probably to find the path of least resistance in propagating the faith), and that the Christian faith is traditionally chauvenistic (e.g. for a man to take holy orders it is a sacrament but not for a woman). But, I don't think that the chauvenism is enough of a basis to ground a theory that Mary Magdalen is the suppressed, denied spouse of Jesus or the matriarch of his bloodline. Like Da Vinci Code, this book is an interesting diversion and foray into a 'what if' scenario, but it is not a research text or one that really answers with any proof the questions that many people have...many of these questions which can only be answered by faith alone.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2004

    A must read for anyone on the spiritual path

    If you are searching for more about Mary Magdalene, here it is! If you are a feminist searching for more of the feminine side of Christianity, here it is! If you have an open mind and wish to have your old beliefs challenged, here it is! The first chapter of the book is fiction, a story about what might have been, but then the Bible is but a work of fiction also, right? Stories about what might have been, written long after the principle player had departed. The balance of the book is interspersed with research and the author¿s conclusions. I consider this a must read for anyone on a spiritual path. Consider this: have you ever considered the fairy tales of Cinderalla, Snow White, Rapunzel, and others, as having a spiritual connection to the New Testament? Have you ever once thought about the unicorn as being a spiritual symbol as well? Please read this book with an open mind and see if some sort of ¿enlightenment¿ doesn¿t happen to you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2004

    Review by a Catholic Priest

    This is a very poor book and not an accurate account of history. Sadly, books like this one (e.g. the fictional 'DiVinci Code')do little to strengthen the faith of believers. I would not recommend this book at all to any faithful Catholic

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2003

    She is way Wrong

    Unfortunately the author has her history and theology wrong. Mary Magdalen was not the women who anointed Jesus and she was not a prostitute she came from a prominent family and was possessed by demons. (Luke 8 2and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out;) Even in the Synoptic Gospels, Gnostic Gospels and Christian Apocrypha she was not the woman who anointed Jesus¿ feet with oils, perfume and her tears. This woman has never been identified and is not Mary Magdalen: Matthew 26:7 a woman came to him with an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume, which she poured on his head as he was reclining at the table. (Whole Chapter: Matthew 26 In context: Matthew 26:6-8) Mark 14:3 While he was in Bethany, reclining at the table in the home of a man known as Simon the Leper, a woman came with an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume, made of pure nard. She broke the jar and poured the perfume on his head. (Whole Chapter: Mark 14 In context: Mark 14:2-4) Luke 7:37 When a woman who had lived a sinful life in that town learned that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee's house, she brought an alabaster jar of perfume, (Whole Chapter: Luke 7 In context: Luke 7:36-38) The only history any where about Mary Magdalen involved in the anointment of Jesus is at the Tomb: Mark 16The Resurrection 1When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body. This brings questionable validity to her discovery which is unfortunate because I do believe there is proof that a very deep relationship existed between Jesus and Mary.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1