Customer Reviews for

The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

I loved The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls! A Florida native

I loved The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls! A Florida native myself, I spent most of my childhood summers exploring North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains at an all-girl summer camp.  DiSclafani's The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a coming of age novel that- th...
I loved The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls! A Florida native myself, I spent most of my childhood summers exploring North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains at an all-girl summer camp.  DiSclafani's The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a coming of age novel that- thank god- isn't overly saccharine or predictable. The author skillfully stitches together a plot of mystery and romance that helps shape protagonist Thea Atwell's development into a young woman. DiSclafani pays great detail into developing her characters into people with depth and intrigue, making this novel an absolute page-turner. The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a MUST read...especially for the summer. Sex, money, and mystery...What's not to love in a great beach book?

posted by bethstone12 on June 6, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

As a huge fan of historical fiction, this book hooked me from th

As a huge fan of historical fiction, this book hooked me from the first few pages. DiSclafani's talent for precise and vivid description is truly wonderful! I was taken back to a world that has long been forgotten - the days before the Great Depression was in full swing...
As a huge fan of historical fiction, this book hooked me from the first few pages. DiSclafani's talent for precise and vivid description is truly wonderful! I was taken back to a world that has long been forgotten - the days before the Great Depression was in full swing. However, the sex scenes in the novel became a little much. It got to the point where I wondered how it continued to contribute to the plot at all. And I was bit disturbed by the fact that Thea Atwell was only 16 years old and pursuing a suitor well beyond her age...

Overall, I recommend this book for its excellent historical narrative and DiSclafani's talent for emersing her reader in a time and place that is not our own anymore.

posted by sydneymccoy1 on August 4, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2013

    An Interesting Book

    This is a very different book. It is compelling and well-written. I enjoyed it very much. On the one hand it is a mystery, keeping you reading til the end to find out exactly what went on. On the other hand it is about a young girl away from home for the first time and what she learns about other people, and about herself. The only criticism I have is that the sex scenes were too numerous. By the end of the book I was skimming over them thinking, "not again." It didn't add anything to the story after awhile, just held the reader back from the closure at the end of the book. I would recommend this book for book club discussions if the readers are aware of the sexual nature of the story and are not afraid to go there.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2015

    Dawn

    Yes. The next two results would probably be the main camp...maybe you place is better...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2014

    Quick read

    Great book.

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  • Posted January 14, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Theodora ¿Thea¿ Atwell lived in a world enclosed in a Paradise o

    Theodora “Thea” Atwell lived in a world enclosed in a Paradise of 1931 – 30 acres of Florida woodlands upon which to ride Sasi, her beloved pony, a house that is “majestic,” and a twin brother who is her best (and largely only) friend.  Outside of her parents and brother, the only people she sees for weeks a time is the family of her paternal uncle, George, his wife, Carrie and their son, Georgie, the senior of the twins by two years.  The reader meets Thea as she is being delivered from her cherished home to The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, a boarding school/riding camp, deep in the North Carolina Mountains, the reasons for this decampment are made to be mysterious from the moment we meet Thea. The mystery of why she was banished from home is slowly revealed as she spends the next year among the daughters of the Elite and the horses that define the camp.
    This novel is narrated from the First-Person-Point-of-View of Thea.  When she arrives at Yonahlossee, she is a typical16-year-old female of her culture – shy, pretty, entitled and expected to be nothing beyond this and, someday, to be a good wife and mother. As she adapts to life at the school, she keeps the other students at a distance as she will “only be there for the summer!”  When she learns that her stay has always been intended to be long-term, she begins to reflect upon the events that ended with her being exiled to a land unknown, among people who are strangers.  She comes to see that the path leading to her being separated from her family began by the choices she made without regard for their consequences.  Those choices, in themselves, were risky but the response to them caused the cataclysmic chain of events whose shockwaves crash over everyone, it seems, who populate Thea’s world and change that world forever.
    The story is set during the Great Depression, when the lines between those with “means” and the increasing number of those who have nothing was clear but, due to the failing banks, the population of the former was dwindling daily. Such uncertainty caused the tension everyone experienced to be elevated.  “Family” was important, but they did not always survive intact. “Expectations” may have been lofty and “set in stone,” but their fulfillment relied upon a cultural system that was outdated and prejudicial.  It was a time very similar to the present.  
    In Thea’s desire/need for connection and place, she learns the deep, painful truth of “disappointing yourself is (the worst thing that can happen to you)” (p. 271).  In the redemption she is offered, she tastes the sweetness of mercy found in self-sacrifice.  Both the disappointment and the mercy are shown to carry a huge cost, as some bridges, once crossed, cease to exist.
    There is some violence (one graphic fight) and many sexually charged scenes in this book.  The author hails from Northern Florida, received her undergraduate degree from Emory but her writing lacks the Southern “flavor” I expected of a writer with such a background.  It is a  bit of the “New Southern Gothic” that seems to be arising, showing how the “Old South” is giving way to a more modern, disconnected, uncertain identity that gives pleasant memories to the past, but has little relationship to those grand Ideals.  It is a book with a quick pace would probably appeal to a more feminine readership and would make an excellent Public Television mini-series.  It appears this is Ms. DiSclafani’s first novel, this speaks well of a bright future.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Aero

    Aero sighs. She summons a book, opening it with telakinetics. (dont think i spelled it right.)

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2013

    Unusual

    This book is unusual, and very good. Very, very good!

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