Customer Reviews for

The Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Not very different from 'Brief History of Time'

In fact 'The Theory of Everything' is 'Brief Historty of Time' in disguise. Those who have studied abovementioned book and previous one, that is 'The Universe in a Nutshell' will certainly feel that Hawking hasn't gone further from 'Brief History of Time'(because the re...
In fact 'The Theory of Everything' is 'Brief Historty of Time' in disguise. Those who have studied abovementioned book and previous one, that is 'The Universe in a Nutshell' will certainly feel that Hawking hasn't gone further from 'Brief History of Time'(because the real science is same). I therefore suggest an ammendment in the title, it should be 'The Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe - Brief History of Time Rewritten.' That is all from my side

posted by Anonymous on June 8, 2002

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

IMPORTANT NOTE

It has come to our attention that the book 'The Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe' has been published. Professor Hawking would like to make it clear that he HAS NOT endorsed this book. The text was written by him many years ago, however the mater...
It has come to our attention that the book 'The Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe' has been published. Professor Hawking would like to make it clear that he HAS NOT endorsed this book. The text was written by him many years ago, however the material has already been published in books such as 'A Brief History of Time'. A complaint was made to the Federal Trade Commission in the US in the hope that they would prevent the publication. **We would urge you NOT to purchase this book in the belief that Professor Hawking was involved in its creation. From Professor Stephen Hawking's website.

posted by Anonymous on January 15, 2005

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  • Posted July 15, 2011

    Great book!

    I see no problem with the photos, not all books have the zoom option & the book is as good as I'd imagined it would be.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2007

    A great jumping off point into theoretical physics.

    The Theory of Everything: The Origins and Fate of the Universe by Stephen Hawking is a compilation of lectures (seven to be precise) written by Stephen Hawking and covers topics such as black holes - a large focus in Hawking's work and study - as well as speculation on the origin of the universe. As the previous reviewer noted, the publication of this book was executed without prior approval of Hawking, however all of the material included in the book is in fact original text by Hawking that has appeared in other publications by Hawking. As such, one should not be discouraged by this as the work is credited to Hawking and all original material. The book begins with a lecture titled 'Ideas About the Universe' in which Hawking provides a synopsis on, as the title implies, ideas about the universe. He takes a historical approach by discussing the ideas and opinions regarding the cosmos held by people as far back as Aristotle right up to the present day realities provided by astronomers such as Edwin Hubble. The lectures are arranged in a logical order so that the book flows from past notions to present beliefs in order to show the evolution of ideas because of rapidly improving technologies and advances in sciences. Of course, no modern theoretical physics text would be complete without a background of Einstein's Special and General Theories of Relativity as well as Quantum Mechanics pioneered by men such as Heisenberg and Planck. Equipped with the basics of these star players in the grand game of cosmology, Hawking discusses in two of his lectures his difficulties in describing, both conceptually and mathematically, the nature of black holes. He also provides a few current speculations as to how the universe originated and what potential fates could result from the different beginnings. Whether or not the universe began from a singularity in the case of the Big Bang, or the universe simply always has been in existence (a rather Zen approach to the problem), Hawking is unsure. One suggestion he makes, which struck me as odd but still plausible, is his 'No-Boundary' idea. Much like the surface of a sphere, which has a finite surface area yet no abrupt 'end' or 'boundary,' so too could the universe behave in such a manner. This certainly relieves the daunting idea of an infinite universe which is hard for many, including myself, to accept. The book as a whole requires no prerequisite knowledge of physics by any means. Hawking writes in such a way that theoretical physics becomes accessible to the layperson. He begins the book with a ground-up approach to allow the reader to become familiar with basic concepts in theoretical physics and then continues to elaborate and build on each concept as they are presented in a neat, logical order. As is common in Hawking's writing, the text is strewn with humorous comments on politics and his disability where he can work them in. While they do not dominate the overall tone of his writing, it provides a good laugh or two so the text does not become entirely dry. One last warning to make in my review is that while Hawking tries to maintain a strictly scientific approach to the nature of the text, he is forced to consider the inevitable concept of a god in relation to the origins and fate of the universe. While he does not advocate any particular religion, it is near impossible to tackle a concept as large as the origin of the universe without at least considering some omnipresent force involved in creation. In short, this book goes highly recommended by me for those wanting an introductory text to theoretical physics and cosmology, or even those needing a refresher on the evolution and present beliefs within these fields of study.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 14, 2011

    Brilliance

    With the way you write, I can understand your lack of comprehension. Fine, you don't understand it, just say so. But your juvenile rant is not at all helpful. Why do you consider it a bad book? "This book sucks" is not a review. What, you expect everyone just to take your incredibly ignorant word for it? And what is the deal with making fun of professor Hawking's handicap? He happens to have one of the most brilliant minds in the world, which is all that counts.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2004

    Cashing in on good books

    Stephen Hawking masterly presents a lucid exposition of the twentieth century science. The foundations of this science were laid before World War II in the works of Einstein, Heisenberg, Plank and Bohr, i.e. well before the era of computers, spacecraft explorations and chaos theory. Hawking skillfully builds on these old foundations in his Illustrated Theory of Everything. Nevertheless puzzling observations pile in my e-mail from e-zines that report current space research. The galaxies and heavy elements found at the outskirts of the accessible universe, the association of quasars with common galaxies and the heaviest stars seen dancing very close to each other, all these are only few examples of the increasing number of perplexing discoveries. The growing pile of poorly understood observations requires reconsideration of the old groundwork of modern science. Otherwise we will sink in swamps of paradoxes, complexities and misunderstandings. If you want to impress and confuse your friends and teachers with some really new basic ideas and far reaching implications, then you should read also Eugene Savov¿s Theory of Interaction the Simplest Explanation of Everything. In this thrilling book a well argued and supported with many baffling observations new picture of the universe is drawn. The revealed astonishing picture will become more actual after each surprising discovery in the macro and micro cosmos. I highly recommend these two books to everyone who wants to become a classroom or coffee table highbrow hero.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2003

    awesome

    I thought that Stephen Hawking is a very intelligent person. Reading his book let me understand the way the universe works. Just what I was looking for.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 11, 2012

    Not exactly sure why i'm forced to remark about this book.

    Not exactly sure why i'm forced to remark about this book.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2004

    A very good book about one fast aging science

    I really enjoyed reading this book. Anyway the incompleteness of the drawn picture of the universe left me with some disappointment. There is one existing and unique way to make the picture of the universe complete and you may find it in Eugene Savov's theory of interaction.

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