Customer Reviews for

Think and Grow Rich

Average Rating 4.5
( 113 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

The Original True Classic

This is one of the greatest self-help books ever, back in the the original 1937 text. Next to the Bible, this is my favorite book. I was introduced to Think and Grow Rich when I read former world champion and International Boxing Hall of Famer Ken Norton's autobiography...
This is one of the greatest self-help books ever, back in the the original 1937 text. Next to the Bible, this is my favorite book. I was introduced to Think and Grow Rich when I read former world champion and International Boxing Hall of Famer Ken Norton's autobiography entitled 'Going the Distance.' Norton shared in his book that he read Think & Grow Rich repeatedly and it changed his life. Norton's book states he was given Think & Grow Rich to read after he suffered his first boxing defeat and had to start over. Norton then went on a fourteen fight winning streak that lasted over three years, including a huge upset over Muhammed Ali for the heavyweight title. This is an outstanding book that embodies Andrew Carnigie's philosophy of achievement to help individuals reach their full potential and succeed. Think and Grow Rich is one of the all time greats.

posted by Anonymous on May 18, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

15 out of 45 people found this review helpful.

Bunk

I was highly disappointed when I read this book. Napoleon Hill is dead on on some very obvious and commonsensical things but way off on tons of others. Yes, autosuggestion & visualizing your outcomes are good exercises but are common sense for most people unless you h...
I was highly disappointed when I read this book. Napoleon Hill is dead on on some very obvious and commonsensical things but way off on tons of others. Yes, autosuggestion & visualizing your outcomes are good exercises but are common sense for most people unless you have super low self-esteem. Nothing new here. Tips on how to write a resume and apply for a job are helpful to the would-be job applicant, but that isn¿t why you bought this book. My biggest bone of contention is due to the metaphysical/new-age overtones throughout the book. Napoleon Hill espouses a concept called ¿infinite intelligence,¿ but never defines it. It is something more like an omnipresent god-force or life force. This is total hogwash, and won¿t solve any MAJOR problems. You don¿t hear of scientists tapping into ¿infinite intelligence¿ to seek out a cure for cancer. How come I can't tap into this mysterious force, to say, tell me the winning lotto numbers or pick winning stocks? Maybe because it is total nonsense. Hill also commits the sunk cost fallacy in the story he tells where somebody stopped digging just three feet short from striking gold. While I see his point that many times just a little more effort will result in a sizeable payoff, sometimes one must know when to stop a futile endeavor. Hill advocates being persistent, but says nothing about how to identify situations when it should be stopped and a new goal should be sought. Hill is a strong advocate of positive thinking. Who isn¿t? Did I have to read this book to find out that it is better to think positively than negatively? No way. While positive thinking is good for many things, it cannot cure Parkinson's Disease or Alzheimer¿s. Napoleon Hill says you can be anything you want to be. Total bunk. If this is true, why didn't he become the next Carnigee or Rockefeller? Does this statement not apply to him, and if it doesn't apply to him, why should it apply to others? Hill also commits the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy, which is ¿Someone did x to become successful, therefore x caused their success.¿ You can't use an example of one person who achieved sucess against tremendous odds and say that therefore anyone can surmount these odds. We hear of the few who are successful against the odds but not of the many who fail. That is how the real world works. Not everyone can be a Bill Gates or a Micheal Jordan. Hill mentions nothing about realistically assessing your skillsets against your goals. He just says go for it. That is stupid. Better advice is to try lowering your standards a bit and you will find you can achieve your goals much easier. Maybe you can¿t build a huge software corporation but you can have a thriving small consulting firm. I don't care how positive you are, there's some things you can't do because of lack of competency. That¿s the sober truth, and it won't sell books.

posted by Anonymous on July 19, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    There are some very helpful recommendations in this book such as visualizing and affirming your success. A positive attitude is considered almighty. But written later, two excellent books, Learned Optimism by Martin Seligman explains the advantages and disadvantages of pessimism and optimism and Optimal Thinking: How To Be Your Best Self shows you how to make the most of your thinking, any situation, your life and career. I would read all three books.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2008

    A Good Visual

    The thirteen steps presented by Mr. Hill are to the point and very honest. His book is not some egotistical scam for our money, thank goodness. I should think that any one who is supposedly 'down on his luck' needs to purchase this book and maybe redirect his steps.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2008

    Great but not the best

    This is a great positive thinking book. Though Mr. Hill has written an inspiring book, I must say I much prefer 'Optimal Thinking' by Rosalene Glickman. She has taken the next step past positive thinking into maximizing your thinking.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2008

    Conceive + Believe = Achieve

    Think and Grow Rich claims to reveal the secret of Andrew Carnegie's success. Maybe it does, maybe it doesn't, but the secret appears to be something along the lines of 'have a goal and work really hard to meet it.' Hill stresses the importance of a positive mental attitude, and makes a convincing case that one's subconscious mind is at least partially responsible for one's success and failures in life. At times, the book wanders into some unusual territories (armchair psychology, paranormal phenomena) but it was probably considered 'cutting edge' 70 years ago when it was first published. As for the title, it's probably worth mentioning that the concepts imparted by the book don't necessarily have to do with material wealth but could be applied to just about any endeavor.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 30, 2014

    Recommend for everyone, not just the business savvy.

    Easy reading and good, practical information. You will be encouraged by the advice given and if you put it into practice, you may be pleasantly surprised.

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  • Posted October 8, 2011

    Must Read!

    Think and Grow Rich is definitely a book that will give you life lessons that will, without an doubt, benefit you in multiple ways. As an young adult and these times, I was most certainly able to understand Napoleon Hill's message. This book is a proving example that thinking does go a very long way. This is must read indeed!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2006

    A classic handbook for success

    Although this book was written many years ago, it has several timeless gems of advice. The mastermind principle has been most helpful for me. Because some of the positive thinking philosophy has become obsolete, and I recommend Optimal Thinking as well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2003

    Good book but outdated

    This book is good but suboptimal. Napolean Hill's idea to think thoughts of success is correct. What we focus on has a big impact on our results. Hill uses the old model of positive thinking which has many flaws. Positive thinking is inferior to Optimal Thinking. Why waste time using positive thinking to seek good and great results, when you can use Optimal Thinking to achieve the best results. If you are interested in OPTIMIZING your success (not just improving it), you have to read "Optimal Thinking-How to be your best self" by Rosalene Glickman, Ph.D. She takes you past wishful thinking and shows you how to be your best self in every situation and how to think in harmony with your best interests. Optimal Thinking is simple and you can put it into practice IMMEDIATELY to optimize your results in every area of life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2000

    Great Start.

    This book is an excellent starting point on the road to wealth. It is as insightful today as when I first read it thirty years ago. If you want to aguire the good things in this life, this book is a must. My only objection to this book is that it doesn't go far enough. May I suggest another book which gives us a simple system for succes that takes these concepts to the next level. Read 'I'm Rich Beyond My Wildest Dreams. I am. I am. I am.' By Thomas L. Pauley and Penelope Pauley.

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