Customer Reviews for

Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism

Average Rating 4
( 51 )
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(26)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted January 23, 2010

    A Way In

    This book is on my list of best books I've ever read. Why? Because someone with a gift has written about autism from the inside out. Temple Grandin has helped me understand autism and Asperger's Syndrome in a way that writers and doctors without it cannot. More. She has simultaneously helped me understand animal thinking better. She has made me more sympathetic to the plight of animals in our care. And because of her gift has made it possible for me to have empathy for all other beings, human and otherwise.

    This is an original book. One of kind. She has managed to give it a balanced viewpoint. Both as a friend of animals and as a meat eater. It is not necessary to cause the animals who provide us sustenance unnecessary pain and suffering. She has proven this. The book is enligtening and touching.

    I recommend this book to ALL readers. Especially those who have friends or family members who have any of the autistic spectrum tendencies. You'll be able to understand your loved ones better. And especially to meat eaters. Be aware, be conscious eaters. Become more active in animal welfare, including farm animals. And be respectful of what they give us.

    Read this book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 22, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Temple Grandin writes of her personal perspective of living with austism.

    The author presents her life experiences of living with autism in a straight forward manner that is educational and insightful. She includes reflections from her childhood that help the reader to better understand her view of other children, relationships between people, her educational process, her family, and the animals in her life. <BR/> There is a photograph in the text of the author as a pre-adolescent in a squeeze box that she designed and built. She had witnessed how cattle became calm when they were squeezed in a cattle chute as they received injections. She applied this concept as a possibility for reducing anxiety in people. In the appendix there is a manufacturer listed who makes and sells the squeeze box.<BR/> She refers to her many accomplishments without attempting to call attention to herself as being very gifted. Her drawings are amazing in her depiction of architectural designs that limit the pain and suffering of animals in the livestock industry. <BR/> She also explains the processes of the limbic system as it relates to God and religious thought.<BR/> I found this account of how Temple Grandin interacts with her world to be inspiring.<BR/><BR/><BR/><BR/><BR/><BR/><BR/>.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2011

    Highly recommended discussion on autism

    I have a major interest in Temple Grandin, and books on Autism/Asperger's, because I have a 5 year old daughter with Asperger's. Nevertheless, Thinking in Pictures is a well written book without that bias.

    This book is NOT about Temple's life - you need to read Emergence to get the story, and it is well worth reading, but ten years later Temple's writing style has improved amazingly. I keep thinking that the movie on Temple's life would have had more influence from Emergence than Thinking in Pictures, but this book has all the publicity associated with it - go figure.

    This book is in many ways technical - what it really is about is Grandin's understanding of what autism is, and how autistic people deal with it, and how 'normals' should deal with it. It is well founded in latest findings in psychology, and has a fresh perspective in terms of Grandin's immense experience in animal behavior. She does use examples drawn from her life, which does, in a way, provide a form of autobiography, but as stated above, it is not the point of this work of non-fiction.

    I can honestly say that I have a more synthesized, cohesive understanding of my daughter's condition reading this book, than all other books put together.

    An excellent read, but if you are after an autobiography, you will be disappointed.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2010

    Fascinating.

    Anyone interested in understanding what it feels like to have autism will enjoy this book. Ms. Grandin writes with honesty.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2012

    Now I know why

    I have always known I was different. Even with a successful executive career spanning 40 years, I struggled with social skills, could not comprehend some "normal" situations, literally covered my ears when the noise level got too loud, hated fluorescent lighting which actually hurt my eyes, jumped at unexpected noise, had a touch of dyslexia and had to struggle to stay focused. At age 15 I was diagnosed as clinically depressed and over a period of 45 years participated in therapy and was put on several different anti-depressants. I had given up my hope of ever feeling normal and settled for feeling okay. At the age of 60 two things changed. My therapist of 2 years changed my diagnosis to bi-polar disorder, which effected a change of medication. For the past 18 months I finally feel normal. But now because of this wonderful book I understand that I was genetically at risk for depression, and know that I have been a high-functioning Aspie and still am! Thank you Temple for sharing your knowledge.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    This book has given me a lot of encouragement!

    I have a 4 year old autistic Granddaughter. I have been reading and trying to absorb everything about autism since her diagnosis two years ago. (I am a Registered Nurse)...This is the first bit of information that totally makes sense to me. After reading the book I bought two more copies for other family members. Miss Grandin explains why there is a pause between auditory and visual information passing through the brain. Since giving Victoria ample time to answer questions her answers are quite amazing. She is gifted in music and the book will help us encourage her. Now I am reading Animals in Translation. I thank Miss Grandin for giving us this information and I thank B&N for supplying the books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2011

    Good Book For Parents of Autistic Children

    I have always wanted to have a glimpse of how my son thinks. Temple Grandin's book offers some personal input and explanations as to why autistic people do certain things and why. She offers advice on how to handle situations and emphasizes on the importance of engaging your child or friend or family member into developing talents with preexisting hobbies to ensure a productive adult life.

    I have only two negative comments. I found myself bored and feeling like I was back in my college Pharmacology class during the Medications chapters. Also Temple tends to repeat herself about certain topics. Of course, I had to keep reminding myself that the author IS autistic and she cannot help it since repetition is a common thing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Autism

    I feel bad

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2011

    Read this only if the subject is relevant to you

    I barely choked this down. It is extremely repetitive. There are interesting viewpoints and anecdotes to be found, but if the repeats were removed it would only be 100 pages long. It should be 100 pages long.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2011

    Fascinating and captivating

    I couldn,t put this book down.

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  • Posted April 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    So that's what it means to think in pictures

    I read Animals in Translation by Temple Grandin last year and loved it. I found her insights and speculations about the thought processes of animals (and people) truly intriguing. Reading the book felt like taking a privileged journey into a world so different from my own that nevertheless exists side by side with my own. In the case of my dog, that magical world lived entirely intertwined with my own, and I remember the absolute delight I felt when the author suggested that people and dogs might have co-evolved to distribute character traits.

    Thinking in Pictures was, of course, first published a long time ago, and my only knowledge of it was references in Animals. and in one of Oliver Sachs' books. But it's been reissued recently to coincide with the HBO film, and each chapter includes updates that I suspect would make it a fascinating read even for someone who'd read the original.

    For me, the book gave delightful insights into Temple Grandin's different way of thinking, nicely narrated in a written voice that sounded in my head like that of a dear friend with Asperger's Syndrome. Before reading, I hadn't really understood how one might "think in pictures," but the author explains it so clearly I found myself realizing that sometimes, like when we play memory games, I think in pictures too.

    The author makes a point of showing how important her "difference" is to the job she does, and likewise how important it has been for many famous people. A small amount of Asperger's might be a wonderful thing, might even be genius, but too much can mean disaster. Similarly depression and creativity often go hand in hand, and a world where all of us are "normal" would be sadly boring. Her comments about genius students with Asperger's left behind in special ed classes were particularly disturbing, and went hand in hand with her many comments about each individual being different. I found myself wondering to what extent we've "normalized" our education system to a level where everyone's expected to be the same, rather than where everyone can be treated as uniquely as they deserve.

    I enjoyed the book and the many ideas, yes and word-pictures, it presents, and I'm very glad to have found it reissued and ready for new readers like me.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Book review

    I found this book to be good and enlightening for those with Autism, it gave me a better understanding of how their lives are so different. It took me four days to read and found it very helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Fascinating and interesting look at autism and the brain.

    Excellent book and a quick read. Temple Grandin gives the world a look inside those with autism. This is an important book for everyone to understanding the different avenues of learning. This book made me think about how I learn. Then, I can apply techniques that will aid in my process of education. I hope educators read this book, not only for autistic students, but also as a step to creating better schools that contain varied teaching styles that adapt to the students versus the children adapting to dry, stale, and threatening learning environments made up of rows and the all mighty teacher that ruled the classroom with punishments. We are better than that!!!! I am a returning college student to receive a second degree and on to a masters.

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    Posted August 18, 2010

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    Posted March 26, 2012

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    Posted March 22, 2010

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    Posted October 31, 2009

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    Posted August 18, 2010

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    Posted April 2, 2012

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