Customer Reviews for

The Third Policeman

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted March 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Third Policeman

    The Third Poiceman was simply amazing. Laugh-out-loud funny, amazingly profound and absolutely unpredictable. Very few times in my life have I found myself mentally reviewing chapters from a book as often as I did with this one. The less you know about this book going into it, the better. I made the mistake of reading a letter from the author at the end before I finished the book and it gave away the twist ending. That didn't stop me from enjoying the book immensely though because the ending is really not what this story is about. 'The Third Policeman' is the type of book that creates a bit of an internal struggle within a person. On the one hand you will want to tell all your friends about this book so they can enjoy it too. On the other hand you won't want to tell anyone about it because you'll want to keep it your own little secret. For those who enjoy mind boggling, hilarious and infinitely creative literature; look no further.

    As a side note: I purchased this book because the B&N website suggested I would enjoy it. After I started reading and enjoying it immensely I did some research and found that it was featured on an episode of the TV series 'LOST'. I have not seen the show so I cannot verify this fact, but if it truly does feature books like this then it must be pretty great.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 16, 2008

    A brilliant masterpiece of postmodern literature

    This book is hilarious throughout, especially the mad ramblings of the philosoper named de Selby and the frustrated efforts of his academic ... more » readers to rationalize his wild theories. de Selby writes vague commentary full of ironic litotes- for example: "he indicates that 'the happy state is not unassociated with water' and that 'water is rarely absent from any wholly satisfactory situation' ... He praises the equilibrium of water, its circumambiency, equiponderance and equitableness, and declares that water, 'if not abused', can achieve 'absolute superiority.'" The recorded responses of the expert panel of his readers constantly either bombastically claim conspiracy against them by other experts or declare that the piece of writing under scrutiny is a forgery and not written by de Selby. Their work is hampered by the fact that nobody can seem to find the definitive volume of his works, and furthermore the libraries they do have are completely illegible. It's impossible to read through the pages-long footnotes referencing de Selby's work without falling into fits of giggles at the absurdity of completely inappropriate word choices and the respect with which they delicately criticize de Selby's insane ideas. Additionally, nearly every line of dialogue with the enormously fat policemen is full of ridiculous malapropisms. The policeman are alarmed continuously by arbitrary readings "of uncalculable perilousness" they take from clocks and levers, and their ramblings about figures and graphs never cease to consternate the narrator and amuse the reader.<BR/><BR/>However the overall theme of the book is not one of humor but one of confusion and frustration, and, ultimately, terror. At every turn the narrator is confronted with inexplicable phenomena that are rendered even more inscrutable by the policemen's confidently preposterous explanations. His confusion and desperation to return home rises throughout the novel, exacerbated by his extremely narrow escape from his execution. Near the end of the story the reader can palpably feel the horror of the narrator every time the third policeman says something seeming to hint that he knows about the narrator's crime of murder. Frantic with prolonged stress and unexplainable surprises (such as that the third policeman seems to be the man he murdered) he finally makes it home safely on a female bicycle, but not to the peace he so desperately wanted. His roommate dies of fright at seeing the narrator, revealing at the last that during one of the previous events of the story he had killed the narrator with a mine, and that the narrator's fiendishly inexplicable experiences including encounters with ghosts and intricate manipulation by the third policeman were explained by the narrator being dead and in hell. Filled with horror the narrator runs blindly down road towards the police station, unwittingly setting the stage for the story to repeat again. The narrator is presumably trapped in this cycle of torture without end.<BR/><BR/>This is by no means an exhaustive summary of the book's plot; it includes such things as an enormous underground network of tunnels constructed by the third policeman, an attempted riot by one-legged men who tie themselves together so as to have two legs per fighting unit, and endless discussion with the policemen on the unusual and ubiquitous topic of bicycles.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2001

    You could call him Franz O'Brien...

    ...for his equally effective, if not superior, depiction of the all too confused state of a dream world where things are at once hilarious and terrifying, where you never know what to believe. One difference between O'Brien's style and Kafka's with respect to this kind of nighmare is that O'Brien is more obviously funny, but that just serves to obscure the sinister events, making them more unexpected. If you like absurd, surreal, funny, plot-twisting, pseudo-scientific murder mysteries, let me know, because I haven't found another.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1