Customer Reviews for

This Scarlet Cord: The Love Story of Rahab

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted December 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Review originally featured on Bookluvrs Haven blog. My granddad

    Review originally featured on Bookluvrs Haven blog.

    My granddaddy was a devout Catholic that loved to read. And my best memories of him are of sitting next to him by the fire as he read stories from the Bible, a book he read religiously multiple times a week. Even though I don't qualify myself to be as devout as he was, it is no surprise that I do enjoy biblical fiction. The bible is filled with exciting stories of love, hope, war and betrayals - the foundations of any good story.

    I attribute my voracious appetite to the written word to him, so thanks grandpa. May you have endless amazing reading material up in Heaven.

    As a kid, I had my favorite stories. Samson was one of my favorite ones, and the one I wanted to hear most of the time. So when I pick up a biblical retelling, I sometimes don't know much about, or remember much about that particular story, such as this story of Rahab. So I am not very concerned with the accuracy of events. I just want a good read, interest read.

    In 'The Scarlet Cord' you definitely get an engaging read.

    Rahab is kidnapped by a band of bandits, but is rescued from their clutches by a young Sala. The two couldn't be from two more different worlds. Sala and his people believe in the one true God. While Rahab and her people believe in many. But the two forge a deep friendship as only two children, with no regard from any worldly imposed differences, can. Rahab's family comes to claim her and take her home and the two young friends separate, possibly forever...

    But it wasn't forever. Through a series of events, Sala and his father find themselves within the city of Jericho on a dangerous mission. At the same time, the old king of the city must perform a ritual to honor the god Baal and give the people their much needed hope for the upcoming year. Rahab is chosen for her beauty as the other half of this ritual, much to her anguish as she does not wish to be the selected beauty sacrificing her virginity. But behold! There is divine intervention! The King dies before he can complete the act!

    Jericho is on the brink of war, and this is only one event in a long chain that picks up momentum as you continue to read this story.

    Love? Oh yes, there is love in this story. A love so strong that it can conquer any difference if both Rahab and Saal can manage to see through their cultural and religious differences.

    Hope? Much hope. But in war, there are no winners.

    War? Tons of it. The majority of this novel is centered around it.

    Betrayal? What's a good biblical story without it?

    All the makings of a good story. All present in this imaginative and intense retelling of the story of Rahab 'the harlot', the Jericho woman who hid Israelite spies inside its city walls, while their world was on the brink of a war that would change history.


    *I received a eBook copy of this book for free to review from the author/publisher via Netgalley; this in no way influenced my review, all opinions are 100% honest and my own.*

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 16, 2012

    I enjoyed reading This Scarlet Cord, by Joan Wolf. This was a fi

    I enjoyed reading This Scarlet Cord, by Joan Wolf. This was a fictional book based on the love story of Rahab from the book of Joshua in the Bible. Obviously, mention of Rahab in the Bible consists of a few verses in chapter 2 and chapter 6. But her real importance is in the book of Matthew, chapter 1, the Genealogy of Christ.

    Rahab, in the Bible, is a prostitute who helps two Israelite spies escape Jericho. They in turn save her when the Lord takes Jericho for his people.

    In This Scarlet Cord, Wolf, takes a slightly different look at Rahab. She breaks the book into three parts. Part 1 is where Rahab and Sala (Salmon in the Bible) meet when he saves her from slave traders. They meet again in Part 2 when Sala and his father, Lord Nahshon, disguise themselves so that people in Jericho will not know they are Israelites‘. Rahab and her family have come to Jericho so that Rahab can find a wealthy husband. Then, in Part 3, this is the part of the story that comes from the Bible in Joshua Chapter 2-6.

    In order to read this book, you need to have an understanding of the book of Joshua so that you are not lead astray as to the character of Rahab. However, it is wonderfully written to give you some insight of the things that were happening at that time to both the Israelites and the Canaanites.

    I really enjoyed just being able to take a glimpse into history by reading this story. Thank you Booksneeze for the opportunity to review this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Rahab meets Sala, an Israelite boy when she is a young girl. But

    Rahab meets Sala, an Israelite boy when she is a young girl. But their families don’t intermingle and she is soon in Jericho while her father tries to find her the perfect husband. Perfect to her father means wealthy and important. But perfect to Rahab means someone she can relate to and who loves her. But that isn’t looking likely; especially when she is noticed by the king.

    In the notes by the author she mentions her intrigue with the story and how it came about. She created a story around why Rahab was a believer and how she came to be part of Christ’s lineage.
    I think she did a beautiful job. The story flows well and while plot driven, also engaged me with it’s well defined characters. It was a beautifully written historical fiction.

    I received this book free of charge from Booksneeze in exchange for my honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1