Customer Reviews for

Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace...One School at a Time

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

An inspirational and uplifting story

A story which shows that people around the world are truly good. Whether this book simply makes you realize that you're not as different from your neighbor as your thought or it inspires you to follow your heart to change the world, it's a great read.

posted by SphinxFeathers on November 29, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

27 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

Not what I was hoping for.

I am an avid reader and love to read about other cultures. I found this book very dull and tedious. It was not really about the culture as the cover hints, but more of an autobiography about a mountain climber who visits that area. Although it does describe the perso...
I am an avid reader and love to read about other cultures. I found this book very dull and tedious. It was not really about the culture as the cover hints, but more of an autobiography about a mountain climber who visits that area. Although it does describe the personality of the people he meets, it does not describe how these people truly live. For example, although it goes on and on about the building of schools for girls, where the lumber and blocks actually come from, you never actually get to 'know' any of these girls or hear their stories. The book is more the author's perception of the people that he meets and the surprising kindness he feels, rather than a voice from a different culture. I found it disappointing.

posted by Anonymous on March 12, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2008

    Not what I was hoping for.

    I am an avid reader and love to read about other cultures. I found this book very dull and tedious. It was not really about the culture as the cover hints, but more of an autobiography about a mountain climber who visits that area. Although it does describe the personality of the people he meets, it does not describe how these people truly live. For example, although it goes on and on about the building of schools for girls, where the lumber and blocks actually come from, you never actually get to 'know' any of these girls or hear their stories. The book is more the author's perception of the people that he meets and the surprising kindness he feels, rather than a voice from a different culture. I found it disappointing.

    27 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 17, 2008

    Great Story, Horribly Written

    I respect and admire Greg Mortenson very much for what he did for those kids in that region which was so desperately in need of help. It is an inspiring story. However, the book itself is confusing, long, and too detailed for its own good. It includes information that really turns the reader off to the book and makes you want to put it down and pick up something else, to say the least.<BR/><BR/>I say skip it.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    Interesting, but not great.

    I read this book after a friend recommended it. I found the information interesting, but I would have preferred a much shorter version. The pages in the back of the book list addresses for donations to the CAI, so I felt that I had read a 300+ page infomercial.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2012

    Three Cups of Tea

    Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson, is an inspiring story of a man with a mission to build schools. In 1993, he tried and failed to climb the world’s second highest mountain, K2, in the memory of his sister. When arriving at the village of Korphe, Mortenson sees children trying to write in the dirt and is inspired to eventually build a school in the community. Back in America, Mortenson lives in his car and struggles to keep his job. Despite his own personal obstacles, he unsuccessfully tries to raise money for his project. Eventually he gets a donation of 12,000 dollars from a wealthy physicist. Mortenson travels back to Pakistan and starts the construction on the new school. With the help of some friends, Haji Ali and Jean Hoerni, he finishes the construction and becomes well educated in the culture of the villagers.
    Mortenson gives up his own personal life to provide education to the young children of Korphe. He faces many physical and political obstacles as well as emotional obstacles throughout his project but he overcomes them all. This book shows the journey of Greg Mortenson as he struggles to help the village of Korphe. Mortenson shows courage and great leadership throughout the book by overcoming challenges. He shows that it is possible to help others even if it seems impossible. The symbolism of the three cups of tea is that when a person drinks a third cup of tea at your house, they are considered family. This symbolism shows how quick the village was to accept Greg Mortenson into their community and their gratitude towards him.
    In April of 2011, CBS’s 60 Minutes challenged the credibility of the book and questioned many of his actions. They stated that they could not find many witnesses and that Mortenson was actually not well known in that area of Pakistan. These accusations make it difficult to admire his work, but nonetheless the book, Three Cups of Tea, is an incredible book on leadership and determination.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2010

    Great Story-- Terrible Writing

    It is too bad that Relin ended up writing this story because it is an inspiring story but it is lost to terrible writing. The writing style chosen by Relin makes the story boring and hard to get through. The reader barely gets a sense of Mortensen's personality. Instead of having this be a personal story by Mortensen where the reader gets a sense of everyone involved the story harps on minute details that really take away from what it important. I hate starting a book and not finishing which is the only reason I was able to continue reading this book. Mortensen's story is sadly lost somewhere in this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 6, 2009

    Unfortunately I purchased a youth version of the book and didn't appreciate it.

    Did not enjoy

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2009

    A Terrible Excuse for Inspiration or Worship

    I was required to read this novel for a college assignment and I have to say that I am thoroughly offended by the entire novel. This man is supposed to be an American but he openly admits through not so subtle comments that the War On Terror is wrong. He defends the area of Waziristan even though they hid Osama Bin Laden. Why should we educate people who will turn against our country and jeopardize our safety? He has a good goal and not all the areas where he builds schools are bad, such as Baltistan. He says that America has never felt like home to him then why are you here? The book is poorly written and we never get to hear first hand from the children he is helping.
    My thoughts are that we have children here in America who cannot go to school so shouldn't we be helping our own children?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2007

    Good Guy. Boring Story.

    I think Mortenson is a wonderful person and should by all means be commended for his work. What he's done is incredible. How it is written...is not. I think this book, in trying to show Mortenson's personal and work lives, did too much. The book would shift from one to another, and it would just seemed random. The point of view seemed to be rather uncertain, as well. Sometimes the story was told in third person relaying Mortenson's feelings, but in the same chapter it could change to third person omnipotent narrator. In addition, I really think the book suffered from a lack of editing. So many things could have been taken out while still preserving the integrity of the story. For example, the Marina side story...what was the point? It almost struck me as being a tad bitter. Mortenson deserves the attention that this book is bringing him. I hope it helps his projects for decades to come. But really, despite all the good intentions...*snore*

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2007

    inspirational, but too boring

    My entire book club was so excited to read this book. Although the premise was very inspirational, the entire story was boring. We were not impressed and don't know why everyone is giving it 5 stars.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2013

    Boring

    This is a slow read.

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  • Posted January 26, 2013

    Basically this is another Lance Armstrong, he raised millions fo

    Basically this is another Lance Armstrong, he raised millions for  CAI but most of it went to line his own pochet, not to mention the money he goy from selling his books, which he gets every penny of it.  Don't buy his book here, instead, spend 2.99 on a Nookbook by Jon Krakrauer who wrote an expose on this eleborate lie of the century.

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  • Posted November 10, 2010

    waste of my time?

    Three Cups of Tea

    After a failed attempt to climb the worlds 2nd highest mountain K2 Greg Mortenson finds himself lost and unnourished he soon wonders into a small village in the Karakoram Mountains named Korphe. The people that inhabit Korphe welcomed Mortenson with open arms and nourish him back to help. After Mortenson sees some children trying to study by writing in the dirt with sticks, without even a teacher to instruct them, Mortenson promises to return to Korphe one day and repay their kindness to him by building a school. Once Mortenson returns to the United states he starts to fundraise in order to obtain the money neede to buil the school. Mortenson is soon living out of his car and is saving all of the money for the school, he sends out 580 letters requesting donations, he receives only one small contribution. After lots of hard work Mortenson finally recieves a large donation from a fellow climber named Jean Hoerni. Mortenson sells all of his belongings and returns back to Pakistan to build the school. While there he learned much about the religon and culture of the Pakistain people. After over coming many obstacles Mortenson finishes his 1st school, but he wasn't satified with just one school and over the next 10 years Mortenson changed the lifes of thousands of people by building 55 schools (mostly for girls) The major theme that is demonstrated in this novel is passion, Mortenson is so passionate about building the school that nothing stopped him from finishing his promises and he single handedly changed the lives of thousands. The only thing that I liked about this book is that Mortenson, the protagonist over-came many struggles and in the end the end accomplished his goal. I didn't like how the book was written, it was extremely boring and didn't keep my attention. The author would be talking about one thing and then switch to something totally different and I would have to go back and reread the passage to understand what he was trying to say. This book is more for adults and not for highschool students, I would not reccommed it to any of my friends or classmates.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    Where's the Flow???

    This could have been an absolutely WONDERFUL story. Greg Mortenson has so much to share. I am an avid reader (non-fiction, fiction, anything! I probably read 5 books a month). I had a very difficult time getting through Three Cups of Tea. I really, really wanted to love this book. This is a story that needs to be told! I found it hard to follow, and tedious on all the wrong details. I picked it up and put it down probably 15 times in the course of 12 months before I was able to finish it. I was bored, I was lost, I was uninterested. I wanted to know what happened, I wanted to understand the story, I wanted to see the fruits of his labor. From the beginning we understand Greg Mortenson's character, his weaknesses and his strengths. Attention to detail and staying focused on one thing are not his strengths. Whoever helped him to organize his thoughts into a story worthy of his incredible work had an enormous task, but they failed. There is no flow in this book and it does no justice to a story that everyone should get to know.

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  • Posted June 6, 2009

    Three Cups of Tea

    I so looked forward to receiving this book, and I heard others rave about it. Personally, it wasn't my 'cup of tea' and I could never get into completing it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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