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Through Rushing Water

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  • Posted January 12, 2013

    Through Rushing Water by Catherine Richmond tells the story of t

    Through Rushing Water by Catherine Richmond tells the story of the Ponca Native Americans through the eyes of Sophia Makinoff and Will Dunn. It is anything but a trite love story. Richmond has taken an ignored segment of American history and woven a rich tapestry of the lives of those who were affected by government policies and those who cared about the Ponca because they engaged themselves in their life and culture.

    Sophia arrives as a missionary to the Poncas following a crushing personal relationship. It is here that she meets Will, Nettie, Henry, and James. Her introduction to the people she has come to minister to proves to be challenging. But Sophia will not be deterred. Before long her life and heart is engaged with the Ponca children she teaches and their families, who are unfairly treated by government agents and those in power who care little for their struggle for survival.

    Will admires Sophia but doesn’t believe he will ever capture her attention, let alone her heart.

    Richmond’s storytelling draws the reader into the plight of the Ponca’s. You can’t help but want to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with Sophia and Will as they ward off the Brule, the Agency representatives, and anyone else who wants to interfere with the Poncas.

    Standing Bear’s speech in the epilogue is magnificent. Sophia and Will, Standing Bear, Julia, Bear Shield, Nettie, Susette, Brown Eagle and Mary, Rosalie, and others will remain in your thoughts for many a day after you read the last word and close the back cover on this written work.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 11, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Catherine Richmond in her new book, “Through Rushing Water

    Catherine Richmond in her new book, “Through Rushing Water” published by Thomas Nelson takes us to the Dakota Territory in 1876.

    From the back cover: Sophia has her life all planned out—but her plan didn’t include being jilted or ending up in Dakota Territory.

    Sophia Makinoff is certain 1876 is the year that she’ll become the wife of a certain US Congressman, and happily plans her debut into the Capitol city. But when he proposes to her roommate instead, Sophia is stunned. Hoping to flee her heartache and humiliation, she signs up with the Board of Foreign Missions on a whim.

    With dreams of a romantic posting to the Far East, Sophia is dismayed to find she’s being sent to the Ponca Indian Agency in the bleak Dakota Territory. She can’t even run away effectively and begins to wonder how on earth she’ll be able to guide others as a missionary. But teaching the Ponca children provides her with a joy she has never known—and never expected—and ignites in her a passion for the people she’s sent to serve.

    It’s a passion shared by the Agency carpenter, Willoughby Dunn, a man whose integrity and selflessness are unmatched. The Poncas are barely surviving. When US policy decrees that they be uprooted from their land and marched hundreds of miles away in the middle of winter, Sophia and Will wade into rushing waters to fight for their friends, their love, and their destiny.

    Sophia Makinoff, of Russian descent, grew up in America and became a teacher. When her dreams of marriage are shattered she signs up for missions work and is sent to the Dakota Territory. As she teaches the Ponca tribe children she falls in love with them and sees their need. Sophia teams up with Willoughby Dunn to stop the stealing of their land. Together these two make a stand through rushing water standing on the Rock of God. This is an exciting story even though there are no runaway stage coaches, no train robberies or take overs of the town by evil gunmen. Just one couple against evil men who want to steal the Indian land and force them to march hundreds of miles in the dead of winter. Ms. Richmond gives us wonderful characters that we care for and root for and shows us a dark period in American history. This is a wonderful read and I recommend it highly. Looking forward to more from Catherine Richmond

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    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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  • Posted July 16, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Blessings In Disguise

    I so enjoyed Catherine Richmond's Spring for Susannah that I really wanted to read her next book...and it does not disappoint!
    We begin with Sophia Makinoff teaching at girls college, and convinced she is about to marry a new Congressman. When things don't turn out as planned she attends a Missionary Meeting and immediately signs up...thinking she is going to China. Again things don't turn out as she has planned and we find her in South Dakota at Ponca Indian Agency where she will teach. What turns out for her to be a disappointment soon turns into a blessing.
    Willoughby Dunn or Will [the carpenter] Nettie and Henry Granville[Mom and son [Rev] and James Lawrence[the Indian Agent]. These are the people that Sophia will be spending her time with, along with the Indian children and adults.
    Will turns out to be such a blessing...he turns discards into something usable...like a dipper for the children to drink their water from using tin cans. Nettie does the cooking, and becomes a dear friend to Sophia.
    Unfortunately the story is based on actual fact...and I find it heartbreaking.
    Come along and experience some of the History in the making of our Country, you will easily get lost in this book. We may not agree with what happens to these innocent people, but it brings to light the facts.

    I received this book through Netgalley and the Publisher Thomas Nelson, and was not required to give a positive review.

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  • Posted July 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    1876 in the Dakota Territory. In 1876 Sophia Makinoff is teachin

    1876 in the Dakota Territory.
    In 1876 Sophia Makinoff is teaching at a college and is soon to be engaged to a U.S.Congressman. To be the wife or even fiancee was just a fabrication of her own making. Congressman Montgomery chose her roommate and friend instead of her. Annabelle a complete and utter mistake for the wife to a U.S.Congressman when everyone knew Sophia would have been the best choice. How would she face her students and faculty? She was utterly humiliated.

    She decides to volunteer to be a missionary in the far east. But instead she is assigned as teacher to the children of Ponca Indian Agency in the Dakota Territory. She had every intention in requesting to be re-assigned to the far east rather than stay in Dakota Territory. It does not take long for her to fall in love with the Ponca Indians especially the children she is teaching. She knew this was the mission God had meant for her to serve.

    Willoughby Dunn was the agency carpenter and also loved the Poncas. He had appointed himself as protector to the new school teacher and was at her beck and call. She tried to ignore his her new shadow but soon she felt her heart warming to this special man. It was Sophia's job to teach the children about the white man's world and ways. And it was Will's job to teach the men to build houses, barns and many other things that were needed to live in a white man's world. But all of this was almost impossible to do without the clothing, blankets, supplies, tools, rations and money. These were things the government had promised the Poncas. On top of that they had no way to defend themselves from other tribes attacking them.

    Sophia and Will worked hard to get what was absolutely necessary for survival for the Poncas to get through the bitter cold winter, sickness and near starvation. They refused to give up on their mission.

    This is a heart wrenching story of neglect and abuse against the Ponca Agency. The author was very thorough in her description of the conditions and neglect the Poncas were forced to endure. The author provides many facts of this historical event.

    If you are more interested do a search of The Ponca Agency in the Dakota Territory. Here is a link if you want to learn more. White Eagle was the hereditary chief of the Poncas when they came to Indian Territory in 1877. As chief, he led the Poncas in their last war against the Sioux before they left Dakota Territory and Nebraska. He was also the medicine man and religious advisor. White eagle led the "hot country" Poncas, those who chose to remain in Indian Territory, for 50 years.

    I highly recommend this book.

    Disclosure
    I received a free copy of this book from Thomas Nelson/Booksneeze for review. I was in no way compensated for this review. It is my own opinion.

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  • Posted July 3, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An eye opener into how the government treatedthe Indians. Sophi

    An eye opener into how the government treatedthe Indians.

    Sophia Makinoff is positive Congressman Montgomery is going to propose to her today. He has arrived at the school where she teaches so she is hurrying to get downstairs to him as all of the students and other teachers are watching. Much to her disappointment, as she nears her destination, he is announcing his engagement to her roommate. She can't stay at school now to face the humiliation so she signs up with the board of Foreign Missions so she can serve in the Far East, like China. Sophia is in for another disappointment when she is assigned to the Ponca Indian Agency in Dakota Territory.

    She finally reaches her assignment after a long, fearful trip and teams up with Reverend Henry Granville, his mother Nettie, James Lawrence the government agent and Will Dunn the carpenter. This is the team that is supposed to teach the Ponca Indians to be American. The government is supposed to by paying the Poncas for their land and supplying them with supplies and tools to build homes, plant crops, and educate them. The government is failing to do their part but the Poncas are learning, doing their part. They trust the government until so many promises fall through they are losing their faith in them but with the help of the team their faith in God is getting stronger.

    Dakota Territory was not Sophia's choice but she is soon fighting for them. Sophia takes it upon herself to write letters to friends, the school she taught at and her old church for donations so the people will have shoes, socks, clothes and learning materials. She also writes the government letters telling them how they are failing the Poncas.

    The letters did more harm than good, it seems she'll have to move on after falling in love with what she's doing and the people she came to help, without completely finishing her job. The whole team is moving on, thanks to the very grumpy Reverend, Sophia has a new job to go to, but her fight for the Poncas doesn't end there. You will have to read the book to get the real story, sad as it is, and how she continues to help them after leaving.

    Catherine wrote a story that lets you know how badly the white people, our government, treated the Indians who they promised to pay for their land but fell down so badly on their part. You get a whole new outlook from this perspective. I'm not much of a history person, and I won't say this came as a shock to me, but it does make you stop and think how could anyone treat another human being the way our government treated them.

    I enjoyed this book even more because it takes place in areas that I'm familiar with, the Black Hills was a favorite vacation spot of my step-dad's when I was younger. She talks about the Yankton, SD, Sioux City, IA and Omaha, NE as well as the newspapers from those areas, the same one's we have there today. I was raised there so it brought this closer to home for me.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    Through Rushing Waters, written by Catherine Richmond, tells the

    Through Rushing Waters, written by Catherine Richmond, tells the story of Sophia Makinoff in 1876. Sophia is originally from Russia, and she finds herself teaching French in New York City, ready to marry a US Congressman. When she learns that the Congressman has proposed to her roommate, she takes the first opportunity to leave the city and become a missionary teacher. She is soon working at the Ponca Indian Agency in Dakota Territory where she learns that the children in the community need food, shelter, and clothing as much as they need to learn about history, science, and math. While teaching at the school, she meets many new people, including Will, the agency carpenter. Will has an attachment to the Ponco people, and he has learned their language and takes every opportunity to teach them carpentry as well as show them that Americans can provide assistance to the tribe.

    I loved the character of Sophia, as she was tough and she did not get scared by those who threatened to harm her. She also grew in her faith during the time she spent in Dakota Territory. She was a great teacher, and was very dedicated to teaching the people. She also showed initiative by reaching out to others in her home community asking them to send supplies to all of the needy Ponco people. Sophia also learns about her relationship with Christ. When she first came to the agency, she didn’t even seem able to pray without the help of her prayer book. As time progresses, Sophia is able to pray on her own and she actually does it at many opportunities. Will was also a great character; he was always trying to do his best for the Ponco people. In addition, he really cared about Sophia. He always put her protection before his own and spent his time to make her life as comfortable as possible while in the Dakota Territory.

    This was a great book, and a quick read. I would definitely recommend it to others.

    I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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