Customer Reviews for

Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Modern Library Series)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

The Quest for the Human Spirit

The most important aspect of this book is to keep an open mind. Nietzsche is presenting the reader with the character of Zarathustra, yet we must keep in mind that the book is Zarathustra's journey as well as our own. At the point of Zarathustra's maturation the reade...
The most important aspect of this book is to keep an open mind. Nietzsche is presenting the reader with the character of Zarathustra, yet we must keep in mind that the book is Zarathustra's journey as well as our own. At the point of Zarathustra's maturation the reader will have completed the journey as well. An excellent read, this book is filled with metaphors and aphorisms that may take a second read to fully comprehend. However, I highly recommend this book to any one who even comes to this page. This is the culmination of Nietzsche's work as he himself said.

posted by Anonymous on June 27, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Plagiarism

Clancy Martin (the 'translator') pretends that this is an original 'from scratch' translation: it is not. For the most part it is not much more than a very light revision of the Thomas Common translation (e.g removing archaic verb-endings and pronouns), occasionally enr...
Clancy Martin (the 'translator') pretends that this is an original 'from scratch' translation: it is not. For the most part it is not much more than a very light revision of the Thomas Common translation (e.g removing archaic verb-endings and pronouns), occasionally enriched with renderings lifted straight from either Hollingdale or Kaufmann (e.g. 'lie around lurking and spy and smirking' - is Kaufmann's work). Plagiarism aside, however, or perhaps precisely because of it, it is perhaps the best available translation of Zarathustra, - even if in one or two places it is let down by some rather silly renderings (though at least they are Clancy's own work).

posted by unheimlich27 on November 26, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2007

    The Quest for the Human Spirit

    The most important aspect of this book is to keep an open mind. Nietzsche is presenting the reader with the character of Zarathustra, yet we must keep in mind that the book is Zarathustra's journey as well as our own. At the point of Zarathustra's maturation the reader will have completed the journey as well. An excellent read, this book is filled with metaphors and aphorisms that may take a second read to fully comprehend. However, I highly recommend this book to any one who even comes to this page. This is the culmination of Nietzsche's work as he himself said.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 26, 2010

    Plagiarism

    Clancy Martin (the 'translator') pretends that this is an original 'from scratch' translation: it is not. For the most part it is not much more than a very light revision of the Thomas Common translation (e.g removing archaic verb-endings and pronouns), occasionally enriched with renderings lifted straight from either Hollingdale or Kaufmann (e.g. 'lie around lurking and spy and smirking' - is Kaufmann's work). Plagiarism aside, however, or perhaps precisely because of it, it is perhaps the best available translation of Zarathustra, - even if in one or two places it is let down by some rather silly renderings (though at least they are Clancy's own work).

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2006

    The greatest gift for mankind

    This book educates us on the reality of 'eternal recurrence' and how Nietzsche would hope that someone would one day rise and personify themselves to be (or live) like his Zarathustra but to follow on their own path to reach this goal. The other lesson learned here is that solitude for each individual in this world wouldn't be a such bad idea from time to time. In fact, that may be the divine secret on how to reach a certain goal expressed in this book. Ubermensch

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    My Favorite Book

    Best writing I have ever seen. Great man! When you read this be in awe because people should really love life. Even some of my own philosophy is in it. Respect this book and get ready to be inspired!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2005

    New Translation of Nietzsche's Masterpiece

    Fabulous new translation. Great introduction by famous Nietzsche scholars. A must-read if you are interested in philosophy.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2013

    Anonymous

    This book is great. Nietzsche's use of metaphor and irony is very hard to understand but nonetheless very poetic. If you finish this book i recommend his next work "Beyond good and evil". This book consists of Nietzsche's philosophy on the ubermensch, eternal recurrence and i believe master-slave morality.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2012

    nietzsche literally changed my entire life, and i'm still only i

    nietzsche literally changed my entire life, and i'm still only in high school. since first reading beyond good and evil and now just finishing thus spoke zarathustra, the entire foundation of the way i perceive, process, and formulate thoughts and ideas has changed in a way that i can only describe as beautiful. "amor fati" is and probably forever shall be my life slogan (along with "so it goes" from vonnegut, of course). this post will probably get a bunch of hate from people who claim to know everything about nietzsche saying "'amor fati'?!?!?! but nietzsche's point wasn't for you to accept his ideas, but to create your own!" whatever. i like it. seriously, this and all of his other books, well worth the read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 22, 2012

    Profound world view

    This work powerfully embodies Nietzsche's athiestic existentialism. Through parable, he reaches back into our past for symbols that hit home for each of us, consciously or not. You can sense Nietzsche's internal struggle to reconcile disgust with the modern man and the faith of belief in mans' future greatness. Thus Spoke Zarathustra is an incredible novel, not just for the content, but also because it reveals Nietzsche's internal struggle that created his external character.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2005

    Spirit of Gravity

    Not Nietzsche's best book, definitely the most frivolous. Definitely a 'must have' for pretentious actors that play at being 'free spirits'. I think this was written as a childrens book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2004

    Nietzsche's best work

    Nietzsche¿s finest work, a mid-point between his break with Schopenhauer and his break with sanity. The book relates the adventures of Zarathustra, who descends from his lonely mountain wilderness in search of the ¿higher man¿. The result in a tour de force philosophical blitzkrieg on all philosophical sentiments. This book will make you question, will make you think, will inspire you, but above all, it is a book that, when finished, will make you say, ¿I do not believe in Nietzsche¿ as you begin to think for yourself. Exactly what Nietzsche intended. ¿And to ask this once more- today, is greatness possible?¿ -Nietzsche

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2004

    Good look at nietzsches views and beliefs

    this edition of 'Thus spoke zarathustra' is the definitive work of Friedrich Nietzsche. the book chronicles zarathustra's isolation from modern man because of his digust of Christian morals and values. Zarathustra goes on a search for the 'upperman' the next stage in human evolution. Where the phrase 'God is Dead' originates from. An altogether good look at the humanistic passions of late 19th early 20th century beliefs and morals. Read the book not to find your beliefs but to learn about those of Christian-hating humanists.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2003

    No exit exists, perhaps the preacher knew this too...

    Human, all-to-human, we are, but we can become nothing more as ourselves. Attempts can be made but they will all fail, for our preconceptions will not so readily change. I believe that I live by my own will, that I have abandoned that which roots down this decadence, this life of man, but I am a fool and a hipocrate. My mindset is such, but the fleeting thoughts of inheritance cloud that which to me is clear. I am everyone and no one, yet both at the same time. Yes, I wish to transcend beyond the transcendent, but the fact that I still label him as such permits me from doing so. I cannot live as a camel, bearing such insipid thoughts, but nor can I destroy them as the lion for I lack the the furiosity. I am a fool, perhaps a higher man, damned by the dragon, be he God or donkey, and lost in this path, this continuation of the same; so, let the festival repeat.---My thoughts after reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra---.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2000

    The book that defined a century

    I find that 'Thus spoke Zarathustra' was one of the most captavating and eyeopening books of our time .True he was quite overzealoused about the topics of God and the Christian church,but if it were not for him...we would not have the same apporach to religion as we do today!So I say, 'Thank you' to the man who defined a century!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2014

    tedious

    War and peace was easier to read...no joke.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2011

    dissapointing

    I liked and hated some of the ideas presented in this book, but the writing style was what really made not like it. It's very jumpy and tedious. frustrating

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2005

    I AM UBERMENSCH!!!

    The path to growing as a human being has been shown threw/through this book. You will grow with the character and learn to feel a certian lust for living life to the fullest. The intro is very good too!! Buy it and be enlightened!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2002

    Those 'All-Knowing' "Jerks"

    On the Sublime and the All-knowing ¿ To know the deepest and innermost thoughts of truth one must rise above the heights and congestion of the muck and mire that holds down and subdues. To look beyond the superficial knowledge, `objective truth,¿ or lies one must lean towards the sublime to discern the riddles of truth, which educators and the `educated¿ convey as All-knowing. And where did this All-knowing come from and the intention of persuading others of it? From the liars, the jealous ones, the moral teachers of today with the power of suggestion! Their plan is to discredit, to humiliate the truth ¿ true knowledge. Why? They seek to bury the truth in their crafty flirts with deceit because truth prevents them to move forward. Truth reveals the monster, the deceiver, and the evil mask behind laughter to give pain. Instead of pursuing knowledge and truth ¿ to love and live Life ¿ the jerks in this world damn it to damn their own because they do not want to find it and know what it means to live life and help others. ¿ From experience and reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra, May 11, 2002

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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