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Customer Reviews for

Tigerheart

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(4)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

A Creative Retelling of Peter Pan

Paul Dear is a sweet boy whose family is a perfect portrait of happiness. But that picture is broken with the disappearance of his baby sister. Through the ambiguous suggestion of the narration, one can guess that she was fatally ill. Overwhelmed with anguish, Paul's mo...
Paul Dear is a sweet boy whose family is a perfect portrait of happiness. But that picture is broken with the disappearance of his baby sister. Through the ambiguous suggestion of the narration, one can guess that she was fatally ill. Overwhelmed with anguish, Paul's mother began to neglect his needs. And with increasing tension between the Dear's spouses, his father also moves out of their house. In solitude, Paul seeks comfort from the animals and from his dream. Yes, he is a special child who can speak the language of animals and go on adventures within the boundary of dreams. If that is all the story offers, isn't it just another Where the wild things are kind of book. But that is not the case. Paul's devotion to his mother urges him to take on the quest of finding another newborn baby to replace the one they have lost. And where else is a better place to look for a child than the Neverland, or the Anyplace as it's called in this particular book?

Tigerheart reminds me of Pan's Labyrinth; it's a story about children, if not necessarily for children. It leads readers to a world full of vibrant, never-ending adventures with insidious fairies, talking animals, valiant Indian, salvage pirates, and not to mention, The Boy that never grows up. Yet at times, that world is so grim and violent. More often I found myself overwhelmed with melancholy or at loss at the cruel realism the story displays. "Oh gosh, no child should go through such heart-breaking or horrible experience" is what I kept thinking. Therefore, despite that many critics have praised Tigerheart as "the book for all ages", I am still uncertain whether it makes a suitable bedtime story for children under 10.

That is not to say Tigerheart is a bad book, more likely the opposite. It's one of the most creative retellings of the ever-loved Peter Pan. Although in the book, Paul is the hero, Peter Pan is the second lead. Unlike the children travelling to the Anyplace to avoid adulthood, Paul's adventure is mature and selfless as his ultimate goal is to make his mother happy once again. Tigerheart flows effortlessly with creative narration and witty comments, lending subtle wisdom to the story without being preachy.

I came to the book with an expectation for a conventional children lit. You know, the type of books with carefree escapades and triumphs awaiting the heroes at the end. And this fixative belief is what constantly shook me up. Tigerheart is nothing as such. As I've mentioned above, there is more than a grain of realistic symbolism in the story. Paul's quest is not always joyful; it's plagued with regret and somewhat violent death of both friends and foes. It turns out that David Peter is an avid comic writer, now that explains a lot about the warfare-and-violence feeling I've been sensing throughout the book. However, at its very core, Tigerheart is a beautiful story about both the pain and the joy of growing up, and yet know that your day of adventure will never stop just because you're an adult. It's a heartbreaking yet profound sentiment I can relate to.

posted by Zuanie on December 22, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

avoid at all costs....

if you think oddly named characters that go to oddly named lands is enough to make a story good, this one's for you. The characters are ridiculous and impossible to care about...I made it thru a little over 100 pages and still couldn't figure out if the main character ...
if you think oddly named characters that go to oddly named lands is enough to make a story good, this one's for you. The characters are ridiculous and impossible to care about...I made it thru a little over 100 pages and still couldn't figure out if the main character is loonie-crazy or what and it got to the point I didn't care. It's all non-sensical and how it's gotten compared to Peter Pan is beyond me. Do a re-read of Peter Pan instead.....

posted by Overby on July 26, 2011

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  • Posted July 26, 2011

    avoid at all costs....

    if you think oddly named characters that go to oddly named lands is enough to make a story good, this one's for you. The characters are ridiculous and impossible to care about...I made it thru a little over 100 pages and still couldn't figure out if the main character is loonie-crazy or what and it got to the point I didn't care. It's all non-sensical and how it's gotten compared to Peter Pan is beyond me. Do a re-read of Peter Pan instead.....

    11 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    Boo

    Between harriet klausner and the other plot reveals and the kids using the book review site as a playground its hard to get a true review. Klausner and these plot revealers should be banned from posting along with these kids who use this site to play. Come on bn, when are you going to put a stop to this.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Creative Retelling of Peter Pan

    Paul Dear is a sweet boy whose family is a perfect portrait of happiness. But that picture is broken with the disappearance of his baby sister. Through the ambiguous suggestion of the narration, one can guess that she was fatally ill. Overwhelmed with anguish, Paul's mother began to neglect his needs. And with increasing tension between the Dear's spouses, his father also moves out of their house. In solitude, Paul seeks comfort from the animals and from his dream. Yes, he is a special child who can speak the language of animals and go on adventures within the boundary of dreams. If that is all the story offers, isn't it just another Where the wild things are kind of book. But that is not the case. Paul's devotion to his mother urges him to take on the quest of finding another newborn baby to replace the one they have lost. And where else is a better place to look for a child than the Neverland, or the Anyplace as it's called in this particular book?

    Tigerheart reminds me of Pan's Labyrinth; it's a story about children, if not necessarily for children. It leads readers to a world full of vibrant, never-ending adventures with insidious fairies, talking animals, valiant Indian, salvage pirates, and not to mention, The Boy that never grows up. Yet at times, that world is so grim and violent. More often I found myself overwhelmed with melancholy or at loss at the cruel realism the story displays. "Oh gosh, no child should go through such heart-breaking or horrible experience" is what I kept thinking. Therefore, despite that many critics have praised Tigerheart as "the book for all ages", I am still uncertain whether it makes a suitable bedtime story for children under 10.

    That is not to say Tigerheart is a bad book, more likely the opposite. It's one of the most creative retellings of the ever-loved Peter Pan. Although in the book, Paul is the hero, Peter Pan is the second lead. Unlike the children travelling to the Anyplace to avoid adulthood, Paul's adventure is mature and selfless as his ultimate goal is to make his mother happy once again. Tigerheart flows effortlessly with creative narration and witty comments, lending subtle wisdom to the story without being preachy.

    I came to the book with an expectation for a conventional children lit. You know, the type of books with carefree escapades and triumphs awaiting the heroes at the end. And this fixative belief is what constantly shook me up. Tigerheart is nothing as such. As I've mentioned above, there is more than a grain of realistic symbolism in the story. Paul's quest is not always joyful; it's plagued with regret and somewhat violent death of both friends and foes. It turns out that David Peter is an avid comic writer, now that explains a lot about the warfare-and-violence feeling I've been sensing throughout the book. However, at its very core, Tigerheart is a beautiful story about both the pain and the joy of growing up, and yet know that your day of adventure will never stop just because you're an adult. It's a heartbreaking yet profound sentiment I can relate to.

    6 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2008

    A swashbuckling tale filled with delight, derring-do, wit and whimsy!

    Peter David¿s dazzling imagination shines again in this timeless story of a boy, Paul Dear, who wants to make his mother happy after tragedy strikes. Paul¿s journey to solve this dilemma leads him to the Anyplace, a fantasy realm inhabited by many colorful characters including The Boy, the pixie Fiddlefix, Gwenny, Princess Picca, and a wise snow tiger. The bad guys, Captain Hack & his sister Mary Slash, and their merry band of pirates, are also interesting and scary adversaries for our hero. David creates a world captured perfectly through the eyes of a child: the naïveté of Paul, the arrogance of The Boy, the overly-responsible Gwenny, the distrust of all adults and the fears of growing up and losing your imagination all infuse the story with a sense of wonder and magic of the Anyplace while still making you scared of the bad guys, curious as to what will happen next. The characters are deep and richly created, with their emotions and motivations grounding the story while allowing them to drive the story forward without it feeling forced. The decisions the characters make are true to themselves and you feel for them when they are in danger, making a funny remark or feel touched by their perceptions of the world they live in. It mixes all of these elements well, along with a witty narrator breaking the fourth wall, talking to the reader and making you laugh out loud in between filling the reader in on what¿s happening. David has a wonderful knack of writing humorous material and incorporating it into the story. I particularly enjoyed the how the origins of the eensy weensy spider, liars whose pants are on fire and chickens who absolutely, positively, must cross the road, all come from the Anyplace. The Boy¿s opinion that people don¿t know what they want because children want to grow up into adults while adults just want to recapture their youth was also funny and yet true. And Gwenny contemplating being a social worker when she grows up was too perfect for words and right in character. While many of these characters and situations appear to be analogous to certain aspects of ¿Peter Pan¿, the classic upon which this tale is based, the novel stands on its own as a wonderful work in its own right. As someone who hasn¿t read ¿Peter Pan¿ but is familiar with the characters and the animated Disney movie, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story, as the story is engaging and original. David excels at taking something familiar and uses it as the foundation to create something new and different, effortlessly moving the story in unexpected directions into an exciting, touching and fitting climax. At its heart, amidst all the adventure of pirates and flying children, is a boy who just wants to make his mother happy, a story I think we all can relate to. This is a tale for all ages to read and enjoy, whether you are reading it to your children curled up in your lap or by yourself under a nightlight, conjuring up images of distant and magical lands as you explore a world made of dreams.

    5 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Pays homage to Peter Pan

    He is a home boy Paul Dear is. His father tells him stories about magical creatures that his mother does not believe in, but accepts the tales as part of her overall happy life. In his dreams, Paul visits Anywhere located on the third star on the right and straight on to morning. The Boy, who is part of Anywhere, meets with him in Paul¿s mirror teaching him things like talking to the animals.--------------- Trouble strikes the Dern household causing the father to leave and the mother to mire in a deep depression. While shopping, Paul finds an interesting curio that turns out to be the Fiddlefix the boy¿s pixie. . Brought back to life and Paul as Paul seeks something in Anywhere that will bring his family back together. The Boy abandons Gwenny and two of his Boys to go pirating with the Bully Boys. Everyone learns what caused the Boy to transform from a flitter gibbet to a cowardly pirate his friends do their best to bring him back to his former frolicsome self. A battle between the Boys and the Pirates is coming with Paul, who wants to go home caught in the middle. Fiddlefix intends to kill her true enemy and Gwenny wants her old friend back.----------------- Peter David pays homage to Barrie¿s Peter Pan. The Boy is a Pan type hoping to not grow up and eager to have exciting adventures, but his escapades place him in harm¿s way and turn him into a villain. His friends prove their love for him by trying to turn him back. Although part children¿s fairy tale and part adult treatise on growing up, TIGERHEART is an engaging fantasy that is a magical retelling of the classic, but never quite settles on a prime audience.-------------- Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    I honestly could not finish this book.

    If I had wanted to read Peter Pan, I would have bought it. Since when are you allowed
    to change the names of the characters in a classic, paraphrase it and put your name as author? This was a real disappointment.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    Music player

    Not alot of villians. *he grins* that mean no competition to take over the world

    2 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

    Peter Pan re-telling

    A well done re-imagining of the Peter Pan story. The narrarator gets a little tedious, but nonetheless a good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    Loved this book!

    Loved they way this was writen!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2013

    Peterpan knock off insanity

    Excuse me but how is this legal? Kids, read peter pan and forget this book, it would be like you making a drawing and the kid next to you photocopied it, drew over it and turned it in. How mad would you be?

    What's happening in the book world? Topsy turvy !

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2013

    Good Read

    Very cool read! There are times I laughed, got mad and even teary eyed along with the characters. The book is similar to Peter Pan but so much deeper. Overall, great book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2014

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