Customer Reviews for

Tithing: Test Me in This

Average Rating 3.5
( 40 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Interesting book on tithing

I just finished reading Tithing: Test Me in This (The Ancient Practices Series) by Douglas LeBlanc given to me by Thomas Nelson's prior to its release. The book is easy to read and contains a lot of storytelling. My only problem with the book is the title. It comes f...
I just finished reading Tithing: Test Me in This (The Ancient Practices Series) by Douglas LeBlanc given to me by Thomas Nelson's prior to its release. The book is easy to read and contains a lot of storytelling. My only problem with the book is the title. It comes from the "ancient practices" series, but the book is really just a series of stories. It is sometimes difficult to find an overall theme or motif throughout the stories or why the author chose those stories over others.

Because the book was labeled as ancient practices I was expecting a bit more church history in the book. With my criticisms aside, I would like to say the book is worth reading if you are inspired by individual stories. They did inspire me to want to give more and it had some interesting about tithing in the book.

posted by Daniel_Kam on February 2, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Not Recommended

I recently received a copy of Tithing: Test Me In This by Douglas Leblanc in exchange for agreeing to write an honest review about it. As a writer myself (and a perfectionist one, at that), this review is hard for me to write. I don't like writing negative reviews, but ...
I recently received a copy of Tithing: Test Me In This by Douglas Leblanc in exchange for agreeing to write an honest review about it. As a writer myself (and a perfectionist one, at that), this review is hard for me to write. I don't like writing negative reviews, but because I promised to report honestly on my feelings about the book, here I go.

I did not enjoy this book. The premise is a good one, obviously. The book is a collection of stories of individuals and families whose decisions to tithe (that is, return at least one-tenth of their financial resources to the Lord) blessed them immensely and, over time, brought them to a place of knowing the Lord better. Sounds great in theory, but the execution of the book was less than stellar.

My main complaint is that the book seems to be written primarily for those with a background in the Episcopalian church. The terms used assume a knowledge that I, from a different denomination of the Christian faith, do not have. That was very frustrating and made it difficult to weed through the language to find the story lying underneath. The stories of lives blessed by dedicated obedience to the Lord were good, but the language got in the way for me. As the book went on, it improved somewhat, but still was difficult to get through. Because each chapter was centered on the life and story of a different family, much of each chapter (and consequently, much of the book) was dedicated to simply telling who each person was and putting their story in context. While necessary for the purpose of the book, I didn't feel that it was well done and I simply did not enjoy reading it.

The introduction to the book did provide helpful background information on the discipline of tithing. and if that is what you are interested in reading, this book may be what you are looking for. However, I feel that there are almost certainly better-suited volumes for that purpose. If you are looking for personal accounts of lives blessed by tithing, I would more easily recommend simply talking to those in your church family.

posted by Jessicabo on January 14, 2011

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  • Posted January 14, 2011

    Not Recommended

    I recently received a copy of Tithing: Test Me In This by Douglas Leblanc in exchange for agreeing to write an honest review about it. As a writer myself (and a perfectionist one, at that), this review is hard for me to write. I don't like writing negative reviews, but because I promised to report honestly on my feelings about the book, here I go.

    I did not enjoy this book. The premise is a good one, obviously. The book is a collection of stories of individuals and families whose decisions to tithe (that is, return at least one-tenth of their financial resources to the Lord) blessed them immensely and, over time, brought them to a place of knowing the Lord better. Sounds great in theory, but the execution of the book was less than stellar.

    My main complaint is that the book seems to be written primarily for those with a background in the Episcopalian church. The terms used assume a knowledge that I, from a different denomination of the Christian faith, do not have. That was very frustrating and made it difficult to weed through the language to find the story lying underneath. The stories of lives blessed by dedicated obedience to the Lord were good, but the language got in the way for me. As the book went on, it improved somewhat, but still was difficult to get through. Because each chapter was centered on the life and story of a different family, much of each chapter (and consequently, much of the book) was dedicated to simply telling who each person was and putting their story in context. While necessary for the purpose of the book, I didn't feel that it was well done and I simply did not enjoy reading it.

    The introduction to the book did provide helpful background information on the discipline of tithing. and if that is what you are interested in reading, this book may be what you are looking for. However, I feel that there are almost certainly better-suited volumes for that purpose. If you are looking for personal accounts of lives blessed by tithing, I would more easily recommend simply talking to those in your church family.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Faithful Folios Review

    Vertical Reach = 2

    The nature of this books layout left little room to discuss the author's personal relationship with God.


    Ministry Message = 3

    When you give to God He takes care of you.


    Craft = 3


    This book has a solid command of the craft and is written in a journalistic format and style. It took me quite some time to read this book because it really didn't hold my attention or deliver the in depth information about tithing I expected.


    Aesthtics =2


    I have to be honest, I just didn't get this cover.



    Dollar$ & $ense = 2.5


    I was a bit disappointed by this book. I am still looking for answers about tithing and I didn't find it in this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Does it Make Sense?

    "In these uncertain times, does it really make sense to tithe?" This is the question that the author of Tithing sets out to answer in this book from The Ancient Practices series which explores traditional spiritual disciplines used for centuries in the Christian Church and tithing is one of these disciplines. Tithing, in my opinion fails to answer this question.
    The book contains a collection of stories about different families and individuals that tithe. The collection of stories recants the importance of tithing in the daily lives of these people but it fails to illustrate the connection of tithing to the spiritual promises of God and the biblical discipline's relationship to spiritual growth. It only discusses how each family views tithing in their lives but not if tithing "makes sense." The author does try however, to convey the results of tithing as compassion, generosity and joy.
    Perhaps relating how tithing causes reliance on God for daily needs and through this reliance and sacrifice, the tither draws closer to God,one may make sense of tithing as a way to grow in a relationship with God. The collection of individuals in the book was growing closer to God through their practice of tithing. A reader of Tithing would have to put this together himself because the book was somewhat of a "dry" read. Leblanc did do well with his research and in putting a collection of such diverse believers of the Christian world together in one place with a common practice-tithing.
    If you are looking for a book to reassure you that tithing is a discipline that God requires of a believer, this would not be it. If you are looking for reassurance that you are not alone in tithing, this would be encouraging.
    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2010

    Interesting, but not life-changing

    Tithing by Douglas Leblanc

    The book Tithing is a religious journalist's view of the ancient practice of tithing. Through the stories of many people across the country, Leblanc tells the benefits of tithing. He uses real-life examples of people associated (or formerly associated) with the Episcopal Church to bring a face to tithing.

    Leblanc uses the stories of these people to encourage the reader to return to the "ancient practice of tithing." The concepts of living simply and being generous are thoroughly discussed as well.

    As a practicing tither, I was excited by the possibilities presented in a book dedicated to the subject.

    Though the book is interesting and fairly easy to read, it deals more with the politics of the Episcopal Church than tithing. Many of the biographies and anecdotes in the book don't even mention tithe or giving.

    Unfortunately, I was bogged down enough by the church politics and so distracted by the numerous off-topic anecdotes that after 3 hours of reading over half of the book, I couldn't finish. The author gave a good effort, but the result fell far short of my hopes.

    I received a copy of this book from Thomas Nelson publishers in exchange for a review. All views and opinions are my own. I am not under any obligation to give this book a positive review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2010

    Not at all what I expected

    In seeing this title you think that this book is going to have some insights since the book is in the Ancient Practices Series. The book is quiet boring, with other's stories. You might find it interesting, but to me, I did not. I however did find myself relating to the last family in the book, John and Sylvia Ronsvalle. Some of their story was a bit boring but when they started talking about how they used to live; paycheck to paycheck, on food stamps, using government assistance to help them pay bills and rent, this started to sound like how we used to be. They made a decision that even though they didn't have enough money to afford the basic necessities in life, they would tithe. Both John and Sylvia didn't come from a tithing family, which is the same for my husband and I, which is why I relate to them and see that if they can do it and let go of the idolatry and the "it's my money" that my family can do the same. I can tithe and be confident that it is going where it needs to go and not to the newest craze that the "Johnson's" have. I can tithe and teach my children to tithe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2010

    Interesting book on tithing

    I just finished reading Tithing: Test Me in This (The Ancient Practices Series) by Douglas LeBlanc given to me by Thomas Nelson's prior to its release. The book is easy to read and contains a lot of storytelling. My only problem with the book is the title. It comes from the "ancient practices" series, but the book is really just a series of stories. It is sometimes difficult to find an overall theme or motif throughout the stories or why the author chose those stories over others.

    Because the book was labeled as ancient practices I was expecting a bit more church history in the book. With my criticisms aside, I would like to say the book is worth reading if you are inspired by individual stories. They did inspire me to want to give more and it had some interesting about tithing in the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2014

    Awesome!

    Love the the plot and thinking u put behind this starr

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2014

    Not interested....

    Not my type of story. But good writing!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2014

    Awesome Face 8D

    Woah o_o

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2014

    Melissa

    Coolness. I like it. Keepbit coming

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2014

    Stone

    I loved it you have great writing skills you should get this published

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    I love it!

    Great grammar, plot, puncuation, spelling, etc. I will say that l always post with 2 stars, so if l accidentally do that, don't think l'm really rating your story that way unless the content of my review is negative. Keep up the great work! <br>
    -Platinum

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Oh My Gosh.

    I freaking love this! It's so detailed and descriptive! [Can I be your co-author? Can we work together on this?]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    The Godly Tests: Prolouge

    Hi! I am Starr. This chapter is gonna explain the history of the world this story takes place in; Rian. Now, I won't need character applications, since I already have all sixteen/thirty two (if you are counting the gods) planned out, but feel free to do so. I'll try to find a way to include them in. So, please leave a review, and I'm open to suggestions! But lets start.
    <br>
    •~-~•
    <br>
    In the beginning, there was only the Creator. The Creator fashioned Rian out of the endless Void, dotting the Void with stars and Rian's sun to shine down on the world the Creator had just created.
    <br> But the Creator deemed Rian to be too empty, and created sixteen divine beings out of the Creator's own consiouness, each being taking three attributes to grant the world. Soon Rian was teeming with life, for one of those beings had granted life in the skies, another in the seas, and another on the land. But there was a special race walking upon Rian. They looked like the divines, had the same intelligence capacity as them, even talked as they did.
    <br> They called themselves humans.
    <br> They had a connection to the gods, and prayed to them when they needed guidence. The gods would sometimes provide help, feeling that they needed to help their subjects. Other times they would shun them, leaving them to their own devices. Gods were never predictable.
    <br> After a thousand years, humans were the dominant race in Rian, priding themselves in their higher intelligence and connection to the gods. The Creator had not felt need to interfere in that thousand years, thinking the gods had handled everything quite well. But nothing is eternal, excluding the Creator.
    <br> And gods, although leading very long lives, could not be either.
    <br> The Creator wanted to pick a human to replace the Fading god. The gods and humans were very alike, aside from their powers and life spans, so it was only natural that a human would rise to be a god when said god was fading.
    <br> Not just any human would do, however. So, the Creator assigned Desfeti, god of fate, time, and destiny, to pick sixteen people that had enough talent to become a god, and one that could overcome the Tests. At the end, only one would still be there, the others either dead or kicked out of the race.
    <br> And so the cycle began.
    <br> Every thousand years, an old god would fade, a new one taking their place. That time is dawing again. Who will have what it takes to become a god? Who will die? And who will just give up?
    <br> This is the story of sixteen people, some ordinary, some not, that fate hisself picked to have the honor to compete to replace him.
    <br> But who will?
    <br>
    •~-~•
    <br>
    So! This is The Godly Tests. Any suggestions? Questions? You can go to the next res, and i will answer them. But reviews go here. And i love reviews! So, please leave one :) ~Starr

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    NRM

    And tada! There was epicness bursting at the pages of the story! Flippin awesome, Starr! I was hooked and am seriously cravin for more!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Violet

    Add in a warrioret named lnya, who helps with the Godly tests and sometimes cheats to get her favorite to victory.black hair blue eyes two swords four daggers, bow and arrows, long living, has survived throught four or five goldly tests. :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Epicness

    Bleepin'...epic...o_o

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 31, 2012

    Tithing

    Tithing is a debated topic the world over. Is it commanded by God? Is there a amount set by the Lord?

    In this book Douglas Leblanc tours the country interviewing many different people from different denominations and different walks of life. From an Episcopalian to an Eastern Orthodox priest... Leblanc covers the full palette of faith.

    This book is informative, and well written. It was not one of the best books I have ever read, but I did enjoy the different thoughts on tithing.

    Score ~ ¿¿
    Violence ~ None
    Indecency ~ None
    Language ~ None
    Age Appropriateness ~ 15 and Up

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  • Posted May 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Short, Simple, Concise Book on Tithing

    Tithing by Douglas Leblanc is part of The Ancient Practices Series. If you're a Christian looking for information on tithing, this is the book for you. It's relatively short, consise, and unjudging.

    Tithing is the act of giving 1/10th, or 10%. This means different things for different people. For some it means giving 10% to their church, for others it means giving 10% to those in need. The tithe has long been a debate in the Christian community, and Leblanc does his best in this book to share the stories of 11 Christian and Jewish families and their personal takes on tithing.

    I enjoyed reading Tithing. The personal stories were both touching and inspirational. Time after time, the stories came back to their title theme: test me in this, from Malachi 3:10:

    "Bring the whole tithe into the storehouse, that there may be food in my house. Test me in this,' says the Lord Almighty, 'and see if I will not throw open the floodgates of heaven and pour out so much blessing that you will not have room enough for it."

    Even though the stories and the backgrounds of the families featured in Tithing are very different, the message that comes forward is very similar. Tithing is trusting God with your money, that He will do with it good things, and that the Bible literally says that we can test him in this. As a person who has been new to tithing in the last year, this book spoke volumes to me. My husband and I, still in our 20's, have a lot of debt from college, etc. We are approaching the tithe in a graduated way, which is also described in the book. This book also offers a glimpse of financial responsibility. It has been said that you can look at your bank statement and see exactly where you're worshipping (where you're spending your money).

    I recommend this book to Christians looking for an open forum of tithing stories. It's a book to read and to draw your own conclusions from.

    Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of Tithing in return for my honest review, from BookSneeze. The opinions above are my own and may differ from yours.

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  • Posted March 23, 2011

    Tithing by Douglas LeBlanc

    This book takes a journalistic view of a number of individuals (or couples) who have been consistent "tithers" during their lifetimes. The main point seems to be to tell each person's story and how tithing has had an effect on their lives.

    To be frank, I had a difficult time with this book. The author does not claim to aspire to educate the reader about the merits of tithing, or even the historical significance of the act of tithing, but to tell the personal stories of a number of people who have/are tithing. It was interesting to read some of the accounts. The author captured stories from people across a wide range of denominations and provided a very journalistic look into how they tithe. I think I was hoping for something with some historical background where I could learn more about the act of faith that tithing is and how it turns our hearts towards God. Not a book that I would recommend to a friend.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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