Customer Reviews for

To Kill a Mockingbird

Average Rating 4.5
( 2108 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1484)

4 Star

(362)

3 Star

(145)

2 Star

(55)

1 Star

(62)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

58 out of 62 people found this review helpful.

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

Jean Louise Finch, better known as Scout, narrates this tale that covers roughly 2 years of her childhood starting from shortly before she started the 1st grade. The story is a mixture of many elements including a mysterious neighbor named Boo Radley, various coming of ...
Jean Louise Finch, better known as Scout, narrates this tale that covers roughly 2 years of her childhood starting from shortly before she started the 1st grade. The story is a mixture of many elements including a mysterious neighbor named Boo Radley, various coming of age issues regarding Scout and her brother Jem, and her father, Atticus, defending a black man accused of raping a white woman. As the story is set in Alabama in the 1930s, the rape case is particularly incendiary.
To Kill A Mockingbird is such a classic piece of American literature that most people read it in high school.
While there were a few descriptions of rural southern life that ran on a bit long for my taste, the novel was well worth reading. For sheer entertainment value, I enjoyed the Boo Radley subplot the most as it is, both, mildly suspenseful and immensely interesting.
Of course, the novel is most famous for the rape trial and this is also compelling in a fairly horrifying and very sad way. Harper Lee paints a vivid portrait of the extent to which African Americans were relegated to a status far below even second class in that place and time. Atticus Finch does a masterful job of defending the accused, but he knows that the all-white jury has practically cast their votes before ever entering the courtyard. The author uses the narrative voice of the children to highlight the blatant injustices and the outrage that any decent person would feel as a result. The technique is highly effective if not exactly subtle.
To Kill a Mockingbird is easy to recommend. The story is interesting, the characters substantial, and the subject is still relevant today. It's a shame that Harper Lee has not published a second novel but this single book is likely to ensure that her voice will continue to be heard for many years to come. A very good read.

posted by 148253 on October 31, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

30 out of 32 people found this review helpful.

Download To Kill a Mockingbird For Free

Download To Kill a Mockingbird For Free From Here goo.gl/xhrdH

posted by 9114493 on August 5, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 362 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 19
  • Posted December 6, 2010

    A Classic and Powerful Novel.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a story that exposes the cruelty of prejudice toward the African American population in the 1930s. The story is told through the eyes of a young girl named Jean Louise Finch (Scout). Scout and her older brother Jem are raised by their widowed father, a lawyer named Atticus, in a small town of Maycomb County, Alabama. One Summer Scout and her brother meet a young boy named Dill who comes from Mississippi to spend the summer with her aunt. Scout, Jem and Dill become good friends and become fascinated with a man called "Boo" Radley, who has not been seen outside of his house for many years due to his scandalous past since he was in prison. Scout, Jem, and Dill believe Mr. Radley is a big and evil man. During this time in the South, racism and discrimination toward black people was common. Scout's father becomes a defense attorney for a black man, Tom Robinson, who is accused of raping a white woman.
    I really like To Kill a Mockingbird because it gives me a better understanding about how sometimes, we as people can be prejudiced and intolerant without reason. The book is an eye opener and shows an interesting glimpse into the cruelty that some people had to go through in the South during the 1930s. Reading this book shows the evil affect of racism.
    If I could suggest a change I would decrease the number of minor characters to gain a more personal view and also add a second point of view to get a different perspective aside from Scout's. I think with these changes would benefit the readers and keep the story more interesting. I recommend people read this book. I find it to be interesting , powerful and it makes a great statement on how justice can be changed by racism.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2009

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    I read To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. This book was about a middle aged lawyer named Atticus who was defending Tom Robinson, a black man accused of raping a white girl. Because he was defending Tom Robinson Atticus' kids were getting made fun of by all the towns' people. All of this drama teaches them a lot of life lessons which helps them mature.

    The theme of this book was don't punish something if it did nothing wrong. I agree that if something is innocent you shouldn't punish it. Harper Lee does a great job in showing the theme and teaching that lesson to whoever reads her book. She states the theme in the book using a metaphor with a mockingbird. Atticus told Jem and scout not to shoot the mockingbirds, because they did not harm anything. They didn't ruin the crops they just sang beautiful songs for everybody to here. She also implies the theme with Tom Robinson and Boo Radley. Also the story taught a lot about the racism back then. How the black people's church was a place white people gambled every day but Sunday. On top of that they didn't have enough money to get a bible for everybody. Another way Lee shows racism is how Jem and Scout got made fun of just because their dad was defending a black guy.

    My opinion about this book is that it was good it kept me very interested and taught me a valuable lesson. I was sad to hear she retired writing after To Kill a Mockingbird. She did really well on this book and I would have liked to read other books written by her. I liked how she wrote about something that was so real back then. How she used the racism and Tom Robinson being accused of rape to teach a lesson to people. Also the book was very interesting. I don't like to read and I couldn't put this book down after I started reading it. It's a bestseller and I can see why now. This is now one of my favorite books.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2011

    Old time classic that never gets old!

    When reading To Kill A Mockingbird, the values it teaches are always applicable to life. Especially for a young adult, it can teach them responsibility and selflessness. This book really warms the heart and you will find yourself wanting to read it more than once. I would recommend it to anyone, great book!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2008

    Enduring

    I read this classic for a group discussion for a book group, and I hadn't read it since I was a child. Its theme of racial injustice is not as powerful as it probably was upon its initial publication in 1960, but the overriding theme of the death of innocence endures. The plot, which lacks pacing at times, is not the book's strongest element the real reason the book endures is because of Lee's flowing prose (copied shamelessly and often: see The Secret Life of Bees for example) and strongly drawn characters, most of whom were based on real-life relatives, friends and neighbors.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent novel!

    This is a must read at any High School or College level!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2010

    LOVED IT

    I read this book for a school project and i ended up really liking it.
    The story is so intense and is a definite page turner. I sort of got confused but the style choice of writing but over all it was amazing. The whole plot was perfect. The ending wasn't what i had expected it to be but that made the book so much better. I wish they made another book to show the life of Atticus and his children afterward.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Classic

    I read this book my freshman year of high school. When I learned that we were to be reading this story as part of a "big grade," I was sceptic. It sounded, to sum it up, boring. Then slowly assigned homework turned to reading for entertainment. Although, this book started out forced upon, it become one of my all time favorites! Sometimes good things just fall into your lap.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Was Impressed!

    At first, when I was given this book in my English class. I was excited to read it, then I started... I was disappointed with the first half of the book. I was slow and dragged on, but I kept going. Once I started the second part of the book, I started to get very into the story. The trial started and the story kept taking new twists and turns! I could not put it down! This book is definitely one that everyone should read. They don't call it a classic for nothing!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 12, 2009

    Good message but was hard to want to read

    This book was required to read for my english class. When we started reading it, I found it to be hard to understand, and the drive to continue was not there. The climax of the book didn't feel like much of a climax, more of the start of something interesting. It's true that most of what happened in the book was related, although it was hard to find in all of the extra description that wasn't needed. Overall, the message was great, but the story had too much background information that wasn't needed, making it hard to have the want to continue. The end was good, but the story did not make me want to read it again.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 19, 2009

    To Kill a Mocking Bird

    To Kill a Mockingbird, a novel by Harper Lee, is about two children, the brother Jem and sister Scout, during the Great Depression. Jem and Scout spent their summers mainly with Dill Harris, their summer-neighbor. All summer they would make up plays and spy on a strange member of their town, Boo Radley. This man was thought to be the town recluse and kept Jem, Scout, and Dill's imaginations curious. During the school year Scout often found herself in trouble and has a difficult time understanding that she has to be a lady. Atticus Finch, the father of Jem and Scout and well know lawyer of Macomb, was hired to defend a man named Tom Robinson, an African American. This causes Jem and Scout to be ridiculed by their classmates when their peers find out that their father is on Tom's side.

    This book illustrates racism and discrimination during the 1930's. It really caught my interest and it is a book I will read over and over again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 20, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Very Good

    This book is on my favorite list for sure, it's very moving. I read this in the 9th grade for an English assignment and I really enjoyed it! Harper Lee creates a very special plot with rich characters that surprises you every time. Whether you're my age or you're in your 70s, you will find a connection to this book and you will learn a treasured lesson from it. Recommended!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    FANTASTIC

    This is a great book. I would recommend this book to everyone. A great story with elements of breaking down racial barriers. Everyone should read this book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2015

    To Kill a Mockingbird creates a profound effect on the reader. T

    To Kill a Mockingbird creates a profound effect on the reader. The theme of social justice and inequality is relevant to today's modern reader. A must read for any person looking for an eye opener. A true love of every high school class.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2015

    Pretty good book though.....

    The book is for about ten to whenever it is a good book and very descriptive

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2015

    To sadow

    Tawnys back

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2014

    To kill a mockingbird

    Good book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2014

    No one impotant

    It starts off boring then it gets a lot better that is why i give it a 4 star

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2014

    Lol this book was on zapped

    <_>

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2014

    To below

    Its probably a glitch

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 21, 2014

    As a student, I am jovial about the fact that I got a chance to

    As a student, I am jovial about the fact that I got a chance to read this book with my peers. I think that Harper Lee has done an amazing job writing this novel. The novel is about a young girl, Jean Louise/Scout, and her childhood. Scout lived with her father Atticus and her older brother Jem. Lee has written this novel in such an imaginable way, I was deluded in being Scout for a moment! The two parts of the story makes it more interesting and makes certain characters paramount. 
    The first part was mainly about Scout and Jem's childhood with Dill (Charles Baker Harris). Dill was soon a good friend of the Finches who lived in Meridian and often came over to Maycomb to his aunt's house (next door - on the same street). Dill, curious to know about Arthur &quot;Boo&quot; Radley, dared Jem to go to the Radley House. Boo Radley is a reclusive and mysterious character in the novel appearing at certain times only. People believe that he isn't such of a good person because of his childhood stories about him stabbing his dad with a pair of scissors! I think Boo isn't such of a bad person, he just tends to harm people with bad intentions. He actually wants to be congenial with Jem and Scout. It is shown multiple times when he drapes Scout with a blanket during the fire and again when he kills Bob Ewell as Ewell tries to murder Jem and Scout. 
    The second part of the book is about the court case handled by Atticus. Atticus was handling a case for a negro, Tom Robinson. Tom Robinson was accused of raping a Ewell (Mayella Ewell). The Ewells are indigent but white making them more important in the society. This court case specifically was one of the most significant cases for Atticus. He mentioned that he is doing this for his children, so that his children still find him trustworthy. Atticus, however, lost this case as he was defending a negro and the judge could have been biased and racist as well. This was a turning point in Atticus's life. After this event, people would present in a very primitive manner. This was also a big deal for Jem and Scout because their classmates would make them look down. 
    I didn't expect this novel about the childhood life in 1930s Alabama during the Great Depression be so good. This novel definitely has encouraged me to read more novels like this.  

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 362 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 19