BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Too Much Money

Average Rating 3.5
( 40 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

If you love Dominick Dunne, you must read this (his last) book

Dominick Dunne died in 2009. He left us with his last book, "Too Much Money". If you're a fan of Nick Dunne's writing, you'll be happy to re-meet Gus Bailey and his cast of wealthy misbehaving characters.

posted by HeidiDew on March 11, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Life Among the Wealthy and the Worthless

I've never quite understood Mr. Dunne's obsession with the denizens of New York City's high society. This is basically a repeat of his earlier books....the reader keeps company for 275 pages with the morally challenged and undeservedly wealthy who have little to do but ...
I've never quite understood Mr. Dunne's obsession with the denizens of New York City's high society. This is basically a repeat of his earlier books....the reader keeps company for 275 pages with the morally challenged and undeservedly wealthy who have little to do but go from one dinner party, lunch, or charity gala to another. Once at these venues, they talk endlessly about other dinner parties, lunches, etc. and who did or said what to whom. People with infantile names like Dinkie, Dodo, Kay Kay, Winkie, and Figgy (I am not making this up) hold vapid conversations with all the depth of a parking-lot puddle. And this is what the entire book is about - empty-headed nitwits and their hangers-on yakking about each other, celebrating their own social status, and doing anything to hang on to it. Frankly, I don't know why anyone would want to attain these "heights" of society, where the air is less rarified than rancid. I'd be kicking and screaming to get out. If the author meant this to be a send-up or skewering of these self-absorbed folk, it doesn't happen - this reader was just weary of their company by the end of the book.

posted by emmi331 on November 9, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 11 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted September 5, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Mr. Dunne skewers the rich and famous.

    Park Avenue magazine gossip columnist Augustus "Gus" Bailey knows better than to open one's mouth on an unfinished story, but he does on the radio. Gus accuses Congressman Kyle Cramden in the disappearance of his intern. Outraged, Cramden sues Gus for slandering him and demands $11 million.

    An octogenarian, Gus fears his big mouth will leave his family with nothing when he dies. He turns to his other occupation, a novelist writing Infamous Lady based on a real homicide. While someone has been convicted of murdering wealthy banker Konstantin Zacharias who suffered from ALS in an arson fire at his Biarritz home, his beautiful widow Perla was never considered a person of interest by the cops. Gus' inquiry bothers Perla who inherited a fortune so has become too big to fail at annihilating others. Rather than litigation, Perla uses amoral tactics to destroy Gus.

    The fascination in this entertaining novel is Dominick Dunn's lampooning his other vocation as a gossip crime columnist having no real meaning especially when defending your life at the heavenly weighing station (kudos to Albert Brooks). Although the exaggerated portrayals of the key characters are over the top of the Empire State Building and adversely impact the extremely thin plot, fans of the late author's column will enjoy the hyperbole as Mr. Dunne skewers the rich and famous.

    Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 11, 2010

    we have lost a great author

    as usual it was a great read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1