Customer Reviews for

Tooth and Claw

Average Rating 4.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted October 20, 2010

    Astonishingly Good

    Tooth and Claw is a pastiche of a very particular form of Victorian romance novel. It changes the usual status-conscious British humans into dragons, that do the usual dragon things (flying, eating livestock, fighting). It does this without violating the forms or logic of Victorian romances, but the dragon characters transform the narrative into sublime social satire. It's a fine read, approached as adventure, romance, or a simple trip into a fantastic alternate world. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2015

    Frostkit

    Where's your den?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2015

    Star Gazer

    Trotted along until he reached the Feather Tree. He spotted raspberry and borage. He purred and grabbed some. He trotted back to his den happily.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2015

    Starstrike

    Sensed a third cat here. His tail twitched.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2015

    Hunting area

    The trees dapple the sunlight on the forest floor. Bushes surrond a large tree, what Clawstar likes to call the "Feather tree." It is always occupied by some bird and its kin. Squirrels nest in it during leaf bare, providing easy prey. At night, the crickets chirp and mice scour the ground for a nibble of anything. Stay downwind; a midnight gust is not abnormal. ~Clawstar

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  • Posted December 29, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A superb satirical look at Victorian customs

    Although society has strict rules of conduct for each of the classes including the ruling nobles, the death of a family patriarch is always rough on the survivors When highly regarded Bon Agornin passed away, his son Blessed Parson Penn vows to play fair with his younger siblings and adhere to his father¿s distribution of the wealth. However, the death bed confession, an act considered a sin by the church, shakes Penn¿s soul when he learns what his father guiltily explains what he did to his family and why sibling love meant so much to him.<BR/><BR/>Still Penn hides what he now knows from everyone but he does inform his brother and three sisters they must partake equally in the feeding so that all of them can gain some of the strength of their late dad. Penn also insists spouses can join in their dining on what remains of their sire; as all should grow and remember Bon as a great dragon. However, although his sister Berend¿ spouse Lord Daverak is already wealthy, he avariciously eats much more than his allotment. This angers his in-laws, but only the youngest son Avan acts by suing him in court. Berend and Daverak take in Haner, who is shocked by the mistreatment she sees in the household while Penn takes in the other sister Selendra.<BR/><BR/>This superb satirical look at Victorian customs through a fantasy lens mindful of Swift¿s A Modest Proposal is a reprint of an early Jo Walton tale. The story line is driven by the five siblings who react differently to Daverak¿s greed. However, it is the dragon hierarchal society with nobles, church, servants and commoners in which even the good ritually dine on the weak that make for an intriguing Victorian fantasy.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2008

    A Long-Awaited Cultural look into the life of dragons

    What Jo Walton has done here has been attempted by a number of authors, but of all the similarly attempted books, hers is the one I still recommend to my friends and colleagues. In this book, one may delve deep into her idea of draconian culture, in an intriguing world of dragons who are civilized and cultured, remaining delightfully savage yet understandable. This book is definitely worth a good afternoon of reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2006

    Right Up There...

    ...with Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice. The stories are so similar and yet so different that I cannot decide which one I prefer more, but this book is amazing and everyone should read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2010

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    Posted January 6, 2011

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    Posted May 16, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2011

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