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The Translator: A Tribesman's Memory of Darfur

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    The Translator is a horrifying first-hand account of the modern-

    The Translator is a horrifying first-hand account of the modern-day holocaust in Sudan. Daoud Hari has seen wretched acts of cruelty that appear in ones only most gut-wrenching nightmares. Unfortunately, these heartbreaking stories are a harsh reality for those living it. Hari, a native to Darfur, a region in Sudan that is under constant attack, became determined to share the horror of his life with the world. In his eye-opening memoir, he does so.


    Hari became incredibly useful to organizations and journalists who were eager to help the war-stricken region. With his ability to speak English, Zaghawa, and Arabic, plus have a gifted knowledge of Darfur's terrain, he proved useful. Hari risked his life over and over to save the country that he once so dearly loved. In his story, he tells that tales of grief and the violence that swept Sudan. This is a book like no other, and we are incredibly fortunate to have it. The memoir brings tears to ones eyes- the graphic detail are absolutely heinous. All in all, this novel is nothing short of pure excellence.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2008

    We are lucky to have this story

    The complete title is as follows: The Translator: A Tribesman¿s Memoir of Darfur by Daoud Hari, as told to Dennis Burke and Megan M. McKenna, 2008, Random House. If this book only reported firsthand on the situation in Sudan, it would already be an excellent, highly recommended book, but Daoud Hari¿s uniquely penetrating, concise eyewitness account puts this book in a higher category: this is a necessary book. If you read no other book this year, at least read this one if you read 100 other books, read this one first. The descriptions of horror can make you weep or wretch, yet the book is infused with humanity, dignity, and even humor--a testimony to the worst and best humanity has to offer. Daoud Hari has witnessed utmost cruelties and survived unspeakable crimes which struck down his family, his village, the region of Darfur, and which continue to corrupt and cripple the nation of Sudan, as its tribal citizens are wiped off the face of the earth or turned into unwelcome refugees. Overwhelmed by the senseless loss of his brother, the escape of his aged mother into the wilderness to hide, the dangerous roaming of his aged, noble father, the author sought to do something meaningful in the wake of madness which engulfed everyone and everything he knew. Armed with his ability to speak Zaghawa, Arabic, and English, and with intimate knowledge of Darfur¿s geography, Hari became useful to aid organizations and journalists. He became determined to help bring to the outside world the stories of those who died, who killed them, how, and why. The courage and humanity of journalists and other individuals who gathered eyewitness accounts of the genocide in Sudan comprise an essential part of his story. He also supplies significant explanations into the historic and cultural contexts of the strife in his country. His frankness makes this catastrophe very real for us.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2013

    This book really answered any questions I had about what is goin

    This book really answered any questions I had about what is going on in Darfur.  Don't miss out on 
    reading the appendixes in the back of the book. They have some good info too.  

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  • Posted February 27, 2012

    An Eye-Opening and Inspiring Read-Highly Recommended!

    The Translator, written by Daoud Hari, is a memoir about Daoud’s own experiences with the genocide in Darfur. Hari, being Zaghawa and born and raised in Darfur, brings to light a whole new perspective on the atrocities occurring in Sudan. He describes his childhood spent in a peaceful Sudanese village, and how life for the tribesmen got turned upside down once the fighting and attacks broke out across his country. Suddenly neighboring villages that had lived in harmony since the beginning were killing, raping, and torturing each other. Daoud, the scholar of his family, had learned English, and therefore began offering his services to journalists and reporters across the globe. Time after time he would risk his life to shuttle these people across the Chad Sudan border and translate for them the tragic stories of the victims of this genocide. While each one was different and more terrible than the next, they all had a way of impacting all those who heard it. Daoud knew this, and knew that it was his responsibility to get these stories out into the world so that people would know what about what was happening in Darfur and that they might help. Eventually his luck caught up with him and while taking journalist Paul Salopek into the warzone which was Sudan they were captured by the rebel forces. Through friendships and determination that fought to stay alive so that one day that may tell their own stories. One major theme in this novel is that your relationship with your family and friends, family specifically, should be one of the most important and valued aspects of your life. Daoud, along with everyone else in his culture, has a very strong respect and love for his family. Family comes first, before everything and everyone else, no matter what. Another theme was that humanity should not discriminate against each other, we should always stick together regardless of race or ethnicity. Personally, I liked how, even though politics has a lot to do with the killings and attacks in Darfur, the book didn’t focus on that part too much, rather it focused on the flaws in humanity that allows all this to happen. I also liked how Daoud didn’t sugarcoat anything that happened to the people he interviewed; he told it exactly how it happened no matter how awful it may have been. The only dislike I had was that there were a lot of run on sentences, but other than that there was nothing I didn’t like content-wise. I definitely think this is a great book for anyone to read because it really makes you take a second look at your life and realize how lucky you are. I value my family and friends so much more after reading this. It’s so inspirational and hearing about these terribly awful things that happen to people makes you want to go out and help in any way you can. I haven’t finished this one yet, but I also recommend reading Tears of the Desert by Dr. Halima Bashir and Damien Lewis, which is also a memoir about Darfur.

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  • Posted November 20, 2011

    Very good read!

    Very inspiring. This man took great risks in order to protect his beautiful country and reveal the atrocities going on within. Courage like this is hard to find. Beautiful story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2010

    Highly Recommended!!!! You should buy this!

    This book was phenomenal! Very informative, heart felt account of what is occurring in the Darfur region today.

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  • Posted December 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A very good book...

    I picked this book up by chance while browsing at the bookstore. I have wanted to know more about the situation in Sudan and this book was quite helpful. Hari's writing style is simple, but gentle and genuine. Of course, the book depicts many of the horrific situations that Hari was witness to while serving as a translator for journalists writing about the refugee camps in Chad. Also, I appreciated the extra appendix chapter at the end of the book that more fully explained the history of the conflict in this region. Very helpful! Of course, reading this book makes me no expert on the situation, but at least now I am more informed about what's going on and am more aware that the Sudanese people need help!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    the translater by hari

    very interesting, first hand information, current experiences, describes different curcumstances in Darfur and Sudan. Excellent for a study. Is topic for United Methodist Women study for this year

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2008

    A reviewer

    sooo good

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2008

    Read this book and be amazed

    Such a down-to-earth, human, and real account of the capacity for evil that is present in humanity, and the undying capacity for kindness...ying/yang...you gain an incredible respect for these people who are suffering such unfathomable indignity and injustice. You realize that saving Darfur is not about charity....it is about self-preservation of our own humanity. If we allow the thirst for oil to let us accept this kind of atrocity, who, and what have we become???????

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2008

    Must read in 2008

    Daoud Hari does and excellent job of telling the horrifing accounts of millions of refugees forced from thier homes by the Sundanese goverment. Dauod helps by being a translator and assisting reporters to getting in and out of Dafur most dangerous areas. The story that sticks so much in my mind is the one where this man tells Dauod of watching his daughter being murdered and being unable to answer her cries for help. I would recommend this book to anyone who, like myself, knows only what we hear on the news. Dauod Hari puts you right there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2008

    A Satisfactory Trip

    This is a noble effort on the part of a first-time author. The language is a bit rough and unpolished at times, although one can understand it as coming in first-hand narrative format, much like a conversation, and devoid of embellishments. It is because of this amateurish approach that I believe this will make for a better movie than a book, since it is clear that the author lacks the necessary training to fully develop the scenery, but as an evil travel digest, it is very satisfactory in depicting the current situation in Chad and Sudan. Best of all: It has convinced me to make an effort to help as best I can.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2008

    A reviewer

    You may have read about Darfur, seen it on the news and even sent a check to aid in the humanitarian crisis, but you will never really grasp the situation until you open the pages of this book and read this memoir. Translating Darfur¿s stories of human pain and suffering into English words reporters could understand and later share with the rest of the world was the work of Daoud Hari a local tribesman. One of the most poignant reflections in this wrenching memoir is his notation that sometimes it was just the telling of a story, the sharing of an experience and knowing that someone was recording it that brought some small measure of relief to victims who verbalized their anguish. At once candid, graphic and yet philosophical this book reminds us that the genocide in the region continues and also helps first time readers understand some of the intricacies of the Sudan and conflict. Hari is a Zaghawan, a tribe that distinguishes itself with scars on the facial temple. It's easy to see that the scars to Hari run much deeper than traditional markings. During his travels with journalists such as Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times, stories of loss, painful, senseless deaths, parents forced to watch their children suffer at the end of bayonets, scores of young men dispatched with machetes 'so horrifying in fact that reporters who saw the carnage had to be hospitalized from the visual trauma' Hari persisted in helping document the inhumanity. Day after day, Hari went back into the field, risking his life to tell these stories and help Darfur¿s voices be heard all the way to Europe and the Americas. Woven into the rich fabric of the book we also learn about Hari¿s family, their lives prior to and during this genocide. We learn about the ravages of fear, the accumulating toll of savagery on the psyche of youngsters and adults who have seen so much terror and heartbreak. We see Hari try to make his way amidst the chaos of life in a disintegrating country where the only law is who has the bigger guns, machetes and soldiers. We also hear Hari¿s own story about his high school English, his camel, his trek to foreign lands 'and a stay in an Egyptian prison when he is caught without legal work permit papers', his love of classic novels such as Robert Louis Stevenson¿s TREASURE ISLAND and KIDNAPPED and Charles Dickens¿, OLIVER TWIST. But most of all we hear his voice and his storytelling almost as if we were sitting together sharing our thoughts. This is one book to buy and share with a friend. Everyone can relate to it because it¿s easy to place yourself in Hari¿s shoes. His gentle storytelling draws the reader in, captures attention and then often asks 'isn¿t this what you want too,¿ such as food for your children, safe shelter, and freedom from fear? If you only buy one book about Darfur, choose this one, especially if you have little knowledge about the situation and want a human perspective and background information. Hari will draw you into his tale, touch your heart and make you wonder why this situation continues to exist.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2008

    An amazing book written by an amazing person

    The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur, is a story that grabs the reader and hangs on tight it doesn't let go even after the last page is read. It is the story of Daoud Hari, a native of Darfur who uses his English and Arabic fluency to translate for reporters who have come to cover the story of the Darfur genocide. Daoud is compelling as he shares the realities of the genocide his style of writing makes the reader feel they're having a conversation with an old friend. He deftly puts a human face on the atrocities occurring in Darfur. Some of the graphic details are horrifying to the point that it physically hurts to read about them a reader of these stories is easily brought to tears. It is this type of reaction that is needed to inspire people to take action, and here Daoud accomplishes his goal of getting the story of Darfur out to the world. It would have been easy for Daoud to focus only on the individual tragedies rampant in the horror of Darfur however, the book also reveals the incredible strength, generosity, and humanity of the people of Darfur and even contains unexpected moments of humor. It is this sense of human connection, of seeing the close-knit bond shared by people within a village and their everyday lives together, that makes the book such a strong voice. The reader comes to care about these people in such a way that they are not faceless news stories, but beloved mothers, brothers, fathers, who are killed in the most brutal of ways. It would be impossible not to read this book without feeling rage, sorrow, and, through it all, a sense of hope that if there are people like Daoud out there, goodness and human kindness can eventually overcome evil. An amazing book written by an amazing person.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2008

    We all have something to learn from this story

    Simple words and a country torn apart from within. Who would ever believe that they would combine to weave a story of such huge dimensions. Of a people who though torn from their homes, some tortured or killed by their own countrymen hold love within themselves for their brothers. Like so many others I have heard some stories and seem pictures of Darfur. I knew that I had no idea of the truth of what is happening in that corner of the world. Daoud Hari uses the stories of individual or of families to bring us the true depth of the horror that occurs there every day. This young man felt compelled to bring this story to the world in any way that he was able. First by being a translator and guide to reporters from other nations. Reporters that he counted on to bring their accounts to people that he counted on to help. The help did come, but all too often it was and is only the help given by organizations and individuals, not governments. The story is being told in whispers, when it should be shouted from the rooftops. It is the not being acknowledged by those with the power to bring the suffering to an end. Hari is continuing his journey, his quest, in the hope that his people will be able to return to the life and families that they so cherish. This is most of all a story filled with hope, and optimism. We all have something to learn here.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2008

    An amazing first person account of the horrors that are happening now in Darfur.

    Franz Kafka once wrote, 'I believe, one should read only such books, which bite and sting. If the book, which we read, does not wake us with a blow on the head,as with a fist hammering on our skulls, then why do we read it? We need the books, which affect affect us like a disaster, a most painful misfortune, like the death of someone we loved more than we love ourselves, that make us feel as though we had been banished to the woods, far from any human presence, like a suicide. A book must the axe be for the frozen sea in us.' The Translator by Daoud Hari is definitely one of those books that Kafka describes. The words that Hari use are simple, but the message is powerful. The story that he tells is filled with horror and tragedy. But underneath all that there is hope. Hope for a better future for his people struggling to survive in the war torn area of the Sudan known as Darfur. A place that has often been in the news of late stories told by reporters in short sound bites before the anchors move on to another story and the reporters return to their comfortable lives. To me those new stories always make the conflict seem so far away, so impersonal and often doesn't stay with me. The exact opposite can be said when reading Hari's memoir. There is nothing more personal than to read the first hand account of an event through the eyes of someone who lived it. They weren't there because some new organization paid them to be, they were there because they didn't have a choice. Daoud Hari survived the attack that destroyed his village and made it safely to a refuge camp in Chad. Once there he could have meeked out a life for himself and perhaps emigrated to another country that wasn't affected by the war. Instead he chose to return to Darfur again and again. Using his language skills to guide reporters and aid workers through the war ravaged countryside so that they could get the story of what was happening out to the rest of the world. He thought nothing about the risk that he was taking, knowing that if he was caught by the government militia or even by any of the Darfurian fighters that he could be killed. Hari's story is very moving and it sucked me in right from the start. When you read it you feel as though he is sitting across from you telling his story. There is a deeply personal connection between him as an author and you as the reader that it doesn't feel as though you are separated by pages. As with any conversations among people he sometimes goes off on a tangent letting the story pull him (and us along with him) to where it needs to go. Hari holds nothing back. He doesn't sugar coat the horrors and he is able to evoke strong emotions from the reader. There were times that I was almost brought to tears. It has been a long time since I've read something that made me feel as much as Hari's The Translator. His words have power and they stay with you long after you are done reading them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2010

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    Posted January 20, 2012

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    Posted April 16, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

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