Customer Reviews for

The Trinity Six

Average Rating 3.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Interesting premise, gets a little mired in the details.

    What began as an exciting book lost it's steam in the middle. Too many tiny details and minor characters to feel like you really knew what was going on without taking notes. Not as good as Alan Furst or others of the same genre in my opinion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2011

    Couldn't wait to be done with it

    I thought this was an inbearably amateurishly written mystery novel, in its overly stylistic language and unsuccessful and boring attempts to build suspense, its plot meanderings with impossible coincidences and its happy-happy Hollywood ending. It took a very good story and turned it into a verbose screenplay for a B- TV movie.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    300 Fine Pages

    Author Charles Cumming has followed up his previous novel with an intriguing tale of skullduggery involving the Russians and the British. The book is some 350 pages, which means that I didn't think too much of the last 50 or so pages. It seems as if the author had dug himself such a hole in making the book interesting, that there was no way to reasonably conclude the novel with that level of interest. In other words- I didn't like the ending! But the 4 stars are for the first 300 pages, so enjoy those and then see if you disagree about the rest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2013

    Good story

    I really enjoyed this author and would like to reaad more titles by him. Great read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2012

    Waste of Time

    Don't bother!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 20, 2011

    Well done

    Thoroughly enjoyable. A great example of the genre. I look forward to reading more like this now.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Tale of Intrigue

    "The Trinity Six" by Charles Cumming is a fictional spy thriller focusing on the theory that the Cambridge Five (a ring of English Trinity College students who were spies for Russia - Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, John Cairncross, Anthony Blunt, and Kim Philby) had a sixth member. As always, what gets the politicians is usually never the act, but the cover up.

    Dr. Sam Gaddis, a British historian of Russian history, has a problem, he owes a ton of money after his divorce and his ex-wife, who married a failed restaurateur, is after him for more money for their daughter's education. A tip falls into Sam's lap about the possibility of a sixth man to the Cambridge Five. Soon Sam discovers that anyone associated with the story ends up dead. An efficient MI6 officer, whose job was to lead Sam off the case, helps Sam get out of hairy situations in an investigation which could hurt those at the top of their power.In "The Trinity Six" by Charles Cumming, the author takes one of the most notorious, written about spy rings ever and puts his spin on it. In this scenario there was a sixth man to the ring and the clues of the cover up go all the way up to the top of MI6.

    The book is a well conceived story and properly thought out. There are treacheries galore, double agents abound and a big secret which I will not reveal. The author incorporates multifaceted stories of greed, betrayal and deception and the all-too-common realization that political leaders are ruthless, amoral self-serving individuals and not the G-d fearing public servants they paint themselves to be.

    There is very little action in the book; hence it is more a tale of intrigue. The first third of the novel is mostly a back story; however Mr. Cumming is an intriguing and entertaining author. Sam Gaddis, the protagonist, is an interesting man who has a knack for being in the wrong place at the right time. Come to think of it, it's a miracle Sam Gaddis survived to the end of the novel.

    I found the plot to be a bit too convenient, information happens to fall into Sam's lap just at the right time, but I did enjoy the Russian/British interaction and the person who had the information about the sixth man was a terrific character, complex and interesting. Mr. Cumming's knowledge and writing talent certainly lends an air of reliability to the scenarios he presents.

    Overall this is an enjoyable book, as a sucker for spy novels I thought it was certainly an agreeable work of fiction.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Around page 180, it really picks up

    Written By Roger Meyer

    It starts slow. Lots of background information for the first 50 pages or so. So much information is included that you might wonder if the story will ever start. All of the minutiae will satisfy some readers that need to get involved with understanding everything about Dr. Sam Gaddis, the main character.

    The plot introduces lots of people with significant information about them. Some of them add atmosphere, but others seem to be included just to add words.

    Due to all the background information the story is slow for the first 50 pages and dribbles along a little faster until around page 150. Then gets moves faster and is more interesting. Around page 180, it really picks up and becomes exciting. The ending completes the story and provides closure to the plot, but may not satisfy everyone.

    The published edition includes an audio CD, which doesn't add anything to the value of this novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is a terrific espionage thriller,

    During WWII and immediately afterward the "Cambridge Five" Trinity spy ring betrayed Britain by providing secrets to the Soviet Union. Once the ring was broken, rumors abounded for years that a sixth person was involved, but had escaped justice.

    In 1992 septuagenarian Edward Crane dies in London. Fifteen years later, a reporter Charlotte Berg asks her friend Russian scholar Sam Gaddis to help her investigate rumors that the sixth person was Crane who allegedly did not die in the hospital, but instead lives and plans to tell his tale. Sam needs money to pay alimony and child support so he agrees because he believes he can write a book on what he learns if true. However, someone wants the news to remain interred as those involved with learning the facts like Charlotte allegedly died from a sudden heart attack; Sam believes she was murdered.

    This is a terrific espionage thriller, which makes the case that the Cold War participants spent plenty of efforts on propaganda with disinformation and misinformation a normal spin (inductively supported though not Cold War era material by the recent WikiLeaks' government entries of recent years). Fast-paced from start to finish, readers will relish Charles Cumming's tale of whether the Cambridge Five was actually the Trinity Six.

    Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2