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True

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

I loved this book! As a longtime fan of Erin McCarthy's I was lo

I loved this book! As a longtime fan of Erin McCarthy's I was looking forward to reading TRUE and was not disappointed. I was immediately caught up in the story, in the characters, in their lives, and in Tyler and Rory's growing feelings for one another. I could not sto...
I loved this book! As a longtime fan of Erin McCarthy's I was looking forward to reading TRUE and was not disappointed. I was immediately caught up in the story, in the characters, in their lives, and in Tyler and Rory's growing feelings for one another. I could not stop reading it and didn't put it down until I was finished. I laughed and I cried. It was wonderful! I rate it five stars whole-heartedly.

With TRUE EM gives us so much more than a wonderful story of opposites attracting. She brings us right into the heart of these two characters and how their differences make them a whole. Rory Macintosh is the sheltered middle-class good girl - studious, logical, always does the right thing, and still a virgin in college. Tyler Mann is a sex-on-a-stick bad boy from the poor side of town - raised by an alcoholic, drug addicted single mother, rough, mysterious, tattooed guy trying to dig his life out of it's hole.

Rory is a incredible young woman. She had her normal insecurities because she was so socially inexperienced which made it difficult for her to connect with others, but she was so utterly honest (with herself and others) and logical that she talked her way through these issues when they came up. Throughout the book she is true to herself and loyal to her friends. I really admired her for that. She was about as far from the typical college drama queen party girl as you could get. She left that all to her roommates, Jessica and Kylie. They were all about how many no strings hook-ups they could manage.

Tyler I loved, loved, loved. Hiding behind his appearance of a tatted, pierced bad boy who acted like he didn't really care about anything was a good man who took his responsibilities very seriously. He is not just all hotness and sex (although he is that yummy stuff too) He has a heart of gold and doesn't hesitate to do whatever it takes to protect those he cares about. And when it came to Rory, he got her, like no one else ever had. With her he was honest, he let her see his true self and what his life was really like, let himself be vulnerable. And he let Rory be Rory without giving her any reason to be uncomfortable with who she was, quirks and all.

EM does a fantastic job of drawing you in and showing what each of their lives is really like, at home and amid their friends. She shows how Rory's family situation clearly contributed to how she interacts with others. And she gives her roommates who are unlikely, but loyal friends. Misguided and slutty, but they don't give up on Rory despite her nerdiness, and do their best to draw her out of her shell. The same with Tyler, she clearly shows how difficult his life is at home and yet how he patiently loves his brothers, and even his mother, unconditionally. How this protective instinct has formed his character and pushed him to better his life and theirs. She also gives him a friend who has his back and provides him a way to get away from that life and have some good times. These secondary characters are well-written and provide so much more than just background to the story. They provide humor and angst and support. But the bones of this story was how these two opposites were able to connect with each other so deeply even though they both had difficulty with sharing true emotions with others.

My only complaint about this book is that the ending wrapped up too quickly and too soon. I wanted more! I was not ready to let Tyler and Rory go. That's how caught up in them and real EM made them to me. I will absolutely be buying the next book in this series if only to see a little more of these two!

posted by MsChris1161 on May 8, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Ok

I was really looking forward to this book, but I couldn't get over the fact that Tyler (the hero) was having on and off sex with the heroine's slutty roommate. Ewwww. I felt that was tasteless and unnecessary.

posted by 9394860 on May 9, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

    I felt pretty let down by this one. I have read many Erin McCar

    I felt pretty let down by this one. I have read many Erin McCarthy books before and this one just felt very juvenile. I know it was geared to a younger audience than her previous books - but the writing even seemed more juvenile. I was disappointed.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 4, 2013

    True is one of those books that I enjoyed reading, but also want

    True is one of those books that I enjoyed reading, but also wanted to punch from time to time.

    There are some great things going on here and a lot to enjoy.

    But.

    What I didn’t enjoy is that the main character, Rory’s, best friends/roommates decide that all she needs to break out of her introverted shell is to have sex. I mean, I understand thinking that or talking about it amongst yourselves, but these girls decide that the thing to do is to pay a guy to have sex with her.

    THEY ESSENTIALLY BOUGHT HER A HOOKER.

    As if that isn’t bad enough, what is far more egregious is that on the night that Rory is sexually assaulted (this isn’t a spoiler, promise) THEY DON’T GO BACK TO THE DORM WITH HER. At this point Rory should have been like YOU ARE THE WORST FRIENDS EVER, WE ARE NEVER EVER EVER GETTING BACK TOGETHER. Because JESUS.

    Okay. Now that that is over with, let’s talk about the good stuff, shall we?

    The strength of True is the author, Erin McCarthy’s, understanding of socio-economics and the role they play in romantic relationships. Rory is a smart, if sheltered, college student who wants to be a coroner. She comes from an upper-middle class family and lost her mom at an early age, so she was primarily raised by her introverted father. But, Rory is kind and open-minded, so she’s not really one to judge. Now, it turns out that the guy her awful friends hired to sex her up is Tyler, a tattooed and penis pierced (I don’t know why this is a thing. I just. Whatever.) bad boy from an impoverished and unstable family. His mother is addicted to pain medication and he and his brothers come from different fathers. While Tyler has a don’t-mess-with-me exterior, he cares deeply about his brothers and wants to take care of them.

    Of course, he and Rory get together in all their star-crossed lover glory. Rory loves Tyler’s commitment to his family and she genuinely cares about his brothers. When she learns that they most likely won’t have a Thanksgiving, she invites them to her house.

    This is where True shines. Rory’s father’s reaction to Tyler and his brothers is incredibly realistic and believable, as is Rory’s reaction to her father’s reaction. It’s the moment of a father recognizing that he can’t dictate his daughter’s life anymore, but desperately wanting to, and a daughter standing up for herself and her decisions, but still trying to respect her father’s wishes. It’s a gorgeous moment that everyone, at some point, goes through growing up and McCarthy does an excellent job navigating those emotions.

    Overall, True is a quick, emotional read that explores the ups and downs of a passionate, but difficult relationship in a way that is unflinchingly realistic. Though I didn’t love the reason why Rory and Tyler met, I did love getting to know these characters. If you’re looking for something that is romantic and passionate, but also true to life, definitely consider True.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 10, 2015

    I definitely have a thing for Erin McCarthy's New Adult books.  

    I definitely have a thing for Erin McCarthy's New Adult books.  She has a way with her characters, and the steamy tension between them, that is so fun to read.  Plus she seems to have such a realistic portrayal of college life that I really love.  These characters were definitely more of what I've come to expect from this author, and I enjoyed them, and the story very much.




    Rory was someone that I did kind of feel sorry for, but at the same time, I identified with her so well.  Not everyone was the most popular girl at school growing up, and even if you weren't an outcast, everyone had moments in their high school life where they felt like they weren't good enough and couldn't get a guy attracted to save their life.  In this, Rory's background was so real.  And to have her friends care enough about her to try and help her, misguided though their idea was, made me really love them.  The dynamic between her and friends was very nice, and I loved their scenes together.




    Tyler was definitely a great guy.  I loved his character so much.  He might have been asked to get with Rory to take her virginity, but he had other ideas immediately, and I loved that about him.  The fact that this guy could care about someone the way he did her, after all he went through at home, spoke well of him and made me like him so much more.  Her relationship with him and his brothers was one of my favorite parts of this story.




    The only issue I had with the story at all wasn't really an issue, more like a pet peeve.  But Rory's father had sort of a stereotypical response to Tyler being in her life.  On the one hand, I found it believable, only because father's do care about their daughters and do want them to excel.  But that the same time, I thought it was a little too predictable.  However, that's the only gripe I had about the story.




    It was warm, emotional, touching, and I loved it.

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  • Posted March 28, 2014

    New series by this author geared to a younger reader, college st

    New series by this author geared to a younger reader, college students? It is about a group of girlfriends who eventually get a guy. This is the first book, I accidentally read it out of order. It is a stand alone book but the other books are connected. This story has a smart girl Rory and her virginity issue. I did not like the idea that her friends and her felt that it was time to lose it. The bad boy guy, Tyler, is offered money to help her lose it. The only reasons he is considered a "bad" guy is because he has tattoos, has a drug addict Mom, is poor, and likes casual sex. He is not mean or abusive and in the end goes to jail for something he did not do. I don't like all the smoking, or the senseless party drinking. I do like that the author gives you insight into the minds of the main characters. I like the emphasis on friendship, family and love conquers all.

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  • Posted October 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    So I always love the tortured bad boys and Tyler did not disappo

    So I always love the tortured bad boys and Tyler did not disappoint.


    This is a story of the pretty nerd and the tattooed troubled bad boy from the wrong side of the tracks.

    Rory was the typical nerdy virgin with two socialite BFF's who once they find out about her v card they try to help her by having Tyler de-virginize her.

    Even though she finds this out She still wants to get to know Tyler even though she logically doesn't understand it and likes hanging out with Tyler. So, against all odds she gives it a go with Tyler.

    Literature wasn't intended to be about perfect people, it was about flaws, very real and very deep human flaws.

    Everything is all good until Tyler's life and Rory's not understanding father get in the way trying to tear them apart.

    But love is strong in these two and logic is not always everything.

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  • Posted June 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Rory¿s nerdy and shy and not able to make friends easily. Luckil

    Rory’s nerdy and shy and not able to make friends easily. Luckily, she’s managed to bond with her 2 dorm mates, even though they’re very different. They help her get out of her shell a bit. When they find out she’s a (gasp!) virgin, they secretly pay Tyler, who happens to be a booty call for one of them, to deflower her. At first, Rory’s unsure why Tyler is suddenly paying so much attention to her, but she likes it.

    Rory was a funny person, she had a great sense of humor, though she sometimes had a hard time letting her hair down. She lost her mother when she was young, and you could tell that played a part in her personality. She loved her father very much, but they weren’t a loving family. She was smart and confident in her abilities.

    Tyler was your typical bad boy – tattooed, dangerous, ladies’ man with a secretive home life that made him want to protect himself from further hurt, but a real softy on the inside. He really did have a horrible home life, no father and a drug-addicted, abusive mother. Luckily, he had his older brother to help him out, and his younger brothers to keep him grounded. He made some stupid decisions throughout the story (not the least of which was accepting money to take a girl’s virginity), but you could tell that underneath he was a pretty decent guy.

    Rory’s roommates were pretty nice, until you realized that they’d paid someone to sleep with her. Why they felt it was so necessary for Rory to have sex was unclear. I thought that was a pretty underhanded thing, and it colored my opinion of them for the rest of the book.

    The plot is pretty repetitive these days: girl is almost raped, boy comes to her rescue, they fall in love. Don’t get me wrong, though, it was entertaining. It was a little disappointing, however, that the near-rape wasn’t dealt with. No police were called, no counseling was sought, nothing. It was spoken of a few times immediately after, then once or twice later, then nada. That was a missed opportunity, as far as I’m concerned.

    The story moved along at a brisk pace, and that was nice. It made it easier to overlook the parts that bothered me, such as Rory’s inconsistent behaviors, her roommates’ attempt to prostitute her out and Tyler’s inability to simply talk about what was bothering him. The romance felt authentic, like 2 college kids getting to know each other and learning to trust one another. The ending was a bit rushed, it could have used more attention. Otherwise, it was a nice quick read.

    The sum up: Predictable but entertaining.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I enjoyed most of this book, even though many of the secondary c

    I enjoyed most of this book, even though many of the secondary characters felt a bit flat and could have used a lot more flashing out. The hero and heroine, though, were solid. I felt for Rory and all her awkward geekiness, and liked Tyler, who really was trying to make the best of a really bad situation. I definitely wanted to keep turning the pages to see where these two were going to go, and was pulling for Tyler and his older brother Riley to be able to hold their family together. I was less than thrilled with Rory's two roommates, however, who had less than sympathetic reactions to something that happened early on to Rory and then went on to follow that particular fail up with a phenomenally insensitive way to "fix" the "problem" of Rory's virginity. As the roommates' involvement waned, though, I found myself liking the book more. Overall it felt like it had more substance than the last few books in McCarthy's "Fast Track" series. My biggest complaint would be for how this book just...ended. Boom. Done. It was as if right in the middle of a fairly significant scene the author suddenly realized she'd reached her desired word count so she quickly and clumsily patched everything up and--finis. Seriously, it was that abrupt. A bit disappointing, especially since I wasn't at all convinced that a sustainable HEA was reached.




    The next book is about Jessica, who was one of the aforementioned roommates and secondary characters. There was a fun scene in this book between her and Riley which I suspect was there to set up book two; as I liked what I saw of Riley I'll probably pick it up. Hopefully Jessica will be more sympathetic as a heroine than as a roommate....




    (ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.)

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  • Posted May 8, 2013

    The concept is what seems to be standard for NA (New Adult = YA

    The concept is what seems to be standard for NA (New Adult = YA with a bit of hot toddy) at the moment. Brainy middle class girl meets handsome hotty from lower class dysfunctional family and they do the magnet dance.
    You know, the suck face then oh no beware, nibble ear then oh no whatever shall I do and ultimately the horizontal tango and I am bad for you scenario, which is in essence the opposites attract magnetic pheromone dance.
    No surprises there then.
    However let's not lay this book by the side of the road just yet (not that I would do that to a book, it would be tantemount to sacrilege). This story is what Beautiful Disaster should have been and to be honest it is quite similar with the exception being that this one has actual content in the plot and not just space saving brain fluff.
    McCarthy has given the main female character some witty lines in combination with her scientific mind. Actually I think it reminded me of a couple from a popular TV show, what Booth and Brennan would have been like if they had met in college.
    There is of course the unfortunate use of the words ghetto/ghetto-rats to describe a certain area the main characters travel through at one point.
    Poor choice of words? Yes.
    Thoughtless stereotypical labelling travelling straight from the horses mouth? Yes.
    Worthy of such debate? No.
    Apart from those mishaps the book isn't laden or burdened with any other covert racist remarks and as such shouldn't be used as an example of failings in society or class structures.
    There are far more many literary works worthy of that distinction and debate, this certainly isn't one of them.
    This is simply a teenage angst-ridden story wrought with hormones, sexist attitudes, and unfortunately probably a good indicator of college life.
    The pressure women place on their own gender when it comes to conforming and accepting less than stellar behaviour from the males around them. Girls are made to feel as if virginity is a dirty word. They feel pushed and rushed by peers, because not being sexually active is deemed as odd one out. The roommates in this story are far more demeaning to the main character than the males.
    Nothing overly complex.
    I received a copy a this book via NetGalley.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 7, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    First of all let me first say that I have been a huge fan of Eri

    First of all let me first say that I have been a huge fan of Erin's books since Bad Boys Online came out and I absolutely love her Fast Track Series. 




    True is a new book and a new Genre for Erin and while NA is not really my cup of tea (maybe I'm just too old who knows)I was pleasently surprised by True. Rory Macintosh is a shy, intelligent college student who happens to be a virgin (seems to be a rare find now a days.) who eventually falls for the bad boy Tyler Mann,even though her college roomates had paid for Tyler to break her virginity things didn't turn out the way it was planned and while I think it was a crappy thing for her friends to do, Tyler had done the right thing. 




    Yes I guess you could say this is a typical good girl/bad boy story but this one seemed more real. I'm actually looking forward to the next book about Tyler's older brother and Rory's roomate.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 14, 2013

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    Posted May 11, 2013

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    Posted May 16, 2013

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    Posted August 14, 2013

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