Customer Reviews for

Tuesday

Average Rating 4.5
( 51 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Tuesday

    Interesting story and great idea~ children will love it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    The richness of the illustrations help to capture the imagination of children and adults alike. With very few words, this book provides exceptional opportunity to talk to kids about the story... and to tell a different story with every reading. The rich blues and greens of the illustrations are beautiful. I was really impressed that each of the frogs seems to have its own personality.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2007

    Tuesday

    This book is about flying frogs. On a Tuesday night a large bullfrog suddenly wakes up to discover he and his lily pad are floating in the air. This book invites the reader to use their imagination instead of reading the text, because there is little text in this book. The frogs go around the community while the people are asleep enjoying the sound of frogs in the warm night air. Read the book to see what the frogs did and to see if anyone spotted the frogs in the air. Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    Tuesday Review

    Caldecott Book Title: Tuesday Reading Level: Kindergarten Genre: Fantasy About the Author: David Wiesner was born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, and graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. His work appeared in several children¿s books, including The Loathsome Dragon, which he retold in collaboration with his wife, Kim Kahng. David and Kim live in Brooklyn, where he devotes full time to illustration and she pursues her career as a surgeon. Book Review: Tuesday is a colorful, almost wordless book that invites the reader to use his or her own power of the imagination. Its purpose is to entertain, and that it does. ¿Tuesday evening, around eight¿ gets the reader using his or her imagination to think about what goes on outside after eight o¿clock. It takes you from frogs swimming in a swamp to frogs flying on top of lily pads as though they were on a magic carpet. As time passes from ¿11:21 p.m.¿ to ¿4:38 a.m.¿ people are enjoying the soothing sounds of the frogs on a warm summer night. I would recommend this book as a fun and enjoyable book to help your child learn to use his or her imagination. Bibliographic Information: Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    Tuesday

    David Wiesner is both an author and illustrator. His book ¿Tuesday¿ was published in 1991 and won the Caldecott Medal in 1992. Wiesner was born in Bridgewater, New Jersey and graduated from Rhode Island of Design with a BFA in Illustration. He has also won two other Caldecott Medals, one for his book ¿Flotsam¿ and another for his book ¿Free Fall.¿ ¿Tuesday¿ is about a ton of frogs that go on a fun-filled adventure on a Tuesday evening, starting around eight o¿clock. They discover that they can fly on their lily pads, and they fly around town all night long until day light. The next day, the police discover a ton of lily pads lying all over the ground. There is also a lady who interviews a man who noticed the frogs that night while he was eating a late snack. Next Tuesday, occurring around the same time, what animal do you think went on a fun-filled flying adventure? Although there are only a few words in this book, the illustrations are enough to enjoy it. They can grasp a child¿s imagination and turn a wordless book into a humorous, long conversation. I think Wiesner did an excellent job with the illustrations. Not only are they captivating with beautiful colors, but the expressions of the frog¿s faces are priceless. The reading level of this book is kindergarten to second grade, ages 4-8. Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2007

    It all started one Tuesday

    This book's adventure takes place on a 'Tuesday evening around eight'. David Wiesner uses quiet possibly the most boring day of the week as the stage for an occurrence that is anything but boring. It is the frogs, something has happened to their lily pads and they are flying, yes, actually flying! Not just one or two but hundreds, maybe even thousands! Can you imagine what havoc a thousand flying frogs could create!? This is another one of his books where no text is necessary. The story hops right out at you. And, if you think this Tuesday was crazy, wait until you see what happens next Tuesday! In addition to winning the Caldecott Medal in 1992, this book also won ALA Notable Children's Book, Sesame Street Parents' Guide, and Parenting Magazine's 'Best of 1991.' Wiesner, David. 'Tuesday'. New York: Clarion Books, 1991. For ages, 5-8.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2007

    8:00, 11:21....

    In 1992, David Wiesner won the Caldecott Medal for his book Tuesday. When David was giving his speech, he explained: A wordless book offers a different kind of an experience from one with text, for both the author and the reader. There is no author¿s voice telling the story. Each viewer reads the book in his or her own way. The reader is an integral part of the storytelling process. As a result, there are as many versions of what happened that Tuesday night as readers¿ As the author of a wordless book, I don¿t have to concern myself about whether the reader¿s interpretation of each and every detail is the same as mine. My own view has no more, and no less, validity than that of any other viewer. Since my intent was for the book, as a whole to make people laugh, all that matters is that the pictures are funny. David was born February 5, 1956, in New Jersey. When he was a little boy, he was constantly using his imagination to recreate his own world. The imaginative quality that is found in his work is attributed to his dreamlike and creativeness of his room. His wallpaper contained of books, elephant heads, ships in bottles, rockets, and clocks. These were the last images he saw before going to sleep all night. His room became his inspiration. You can see this in his book, Hurricane, found on page thirteen. It shows the pattern of the wallpaper from when he was a little boy, and the boy in the picture is holding a toy. All of his books are illustrated very well and they allow the children to use their imagination to tell the story. On the first page, the book says ¿Tuesday Evening, Around Eight.¿ Pictures show frogs flying on their magic lily pads. Then 11.21 p.m. comes around, and what does the man hear? The time passes and the following Tuesday, what happens? The book leaves the readers sitting on the edge of their seats and wanting to keep turning the page. I like this book because it allows the reader to be creative and allows the imagination to wonder. It lets the reader tell the story and creates an atmosphere full of creativity and fun. The reading level of the book is kindergarten to first grade. David says ¿To know that my own pictures may be inspiring imaginations with the same wonder I felt as a child is very satisfying feeling.¿ Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2006

    Tuesday

    What do you think happens on Tuesdays? Maybe you get up in the morning and go to school, and then come home and do your homework. Not according to David Wiesner! Find out what happens on any given Tuesday, in any given place on the Earth according to author David Wiesner!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Tuesday

    Tuesday by David Wiesner, a great book for readers and non- readers. Wiesner gives only the time setting, requiring children to use their imagination to what all the chaos was on this dark Tuesday evening. As the light from the moon lit the night sky, frogs flying everywhere on lily pads high in the night sky. Zooming past people¿s windows soundless with only smiles on their face up down and around. Thank goodness the world was sound asleep, well except for one Mr. who was up for a late night snack. He couldn¿t turn to look as he peered out of the corner of his eye, he just about choked on his sandwich. Possibly peanut butter and jelly, he did have some milk. Wiesner¿s illustrations were filled hundreds of words only there are none actually on the page. Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books/ a Houghton Mifflin Company, 1991

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Different kind of day

    This book, Tuesday, is a great way for young children who cannot read yet, enjoy a great story. It tells of a tale of frogs on lilly pads enjoying a Tuesday night. This is no ordinary Tuesday night though, the frogs fly on lilly pads inside a house, chases dogs, and other great adventures. This story would be great for kindergarten children up to first graders. David has illustrated more than 20 award winning books. Tuesday won the Caldecott Medal in 1992. David Wiesner lives in Philadelphia with his wife, daughter, and son. This story fits into the fantasy category.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Caldecott Medal: Tuesday

    This nearly wordless book is stunning. Wiesner uses beautiful illustrations to tell the story. David Wiesner, the author and illustrator, was born and raised in New Jersey. He received the Caldecott medal for this particular book in 1992. Just as the full moon is rising on Tuesday, lily pads begin to take off with frogs on them. The sky becomes filled with flying frogs. As soon as dawn comes, they come crashing to the ground back to their normal life. What will happen next Tuesday? Weisner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion, 1991. Reading level: Ages 4-8

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    No words

    Around ¿8:00 pm¿ as the book says frogs begin to fly. At ¿11:21 pm¿ they fly into sheet hanging on a clothes line, says the book. They turn the sheets into capes and continue to fly. They end up going into a house and watching television until 4:28 am when a dog starts to chase them. Then the frogs begin to chase the dog. After this long night the frogs return home to their pond. The next morning lily pads are found all over the city and no one can figure out what has been going on. The next Tuesday pigs begin to fly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2006

    A fantasy book where the reader's imagination runs wild

    Tueday, by David Wiesner, is a fun read for everyone. Children and adults alike will have their imaginations running wild. The only words in the book are, ' Tuesday evening around eight...Next Tuesday, 7:58 P.M.' The rest of the book shows detailed pictures of frogs getting into trouble. The frogs are flying on lily pads spying on people, running thru clothes lines, sneaking into homes, watching T.V., and more. Children will go bonkers for what will happen next, and begin imagining what else could happen. The theme of the book nothing more than imagination and through it anything is possible. I would recommend this book for grades K-3. David Wiesner grew up in a suburban New Jersey where is imagination began to take off. He attend the Rhode Island School of Design where he commited himself to art and wordless storytelling. It was at the school that he meet David Macaulay and Tom Sgouros. They taught him the fundamentals drawing and painting. He gives them create for inspiring him to be the author he is today. Tuesday is dedicated to David Macaulay, while The Three Pgs is dedicated to Tom. David has illustrated more than 20 award winning books. Tuesday won the Caldecott Medal in 1992. Wiesner lives in Philadelphia with his wife, daughter, and son. I really liked this book, not only because it was easy to read, but because you are forced to use your imagination. The colors and illustrations are absolutely amazing. Full of detail to foster the imagination. This is a good book, one that you can write your own story to.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Not just any day of the Week

    ¿The events recorded here are verified by an undisclosed source to have happened somewhere, U.S.A., on Tuesday. All those in doubt are reminded that there is always another TUESDAY.¿ David Wiesner, the author and illustrator of Tuesday, invites the readers to use their imaginations and tell a story themselves instead of just reading one. Take a journey with the frogs at night as they fly through the air seeing the world below them. Then as day starts to break they land safely back into their pond. But they leave something behind. You tell the story. David Wiesner not only won the Caldecott Medal with this book, he received the Caldecott Honor Medal for this first book Free Fall. He lives in Brooklyn where he devotees full time to illustration.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Caldecott Winner Tuesday

    This book teaches children to use their imaginations on what they think might be happening at night. David Wiesner¿s use of text such as, ¿11:21 p.m.,¿ makes the children think and picture what they think might be happening at that time. The illustrations are of frogs rising in the air on lily pads, then floating into and exploring the houses of people while they are sleeping. I really enjoyed this book and the way it makes the child use their head. I like how the book makes children think on what may be happening. Children get to draw their own conclusions to what they read. This book was written and illustrated by David Wiesner. Mr. Wiesner grew up in Bridgewater, New Jersey. He graduated fro the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in illustration. Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Tuesdays

    There aren't that many wordless picture books out there these days though Wiesner has made a name for himself by specializing in this area. After reading 'Tuesday', you can understand why he deserves this honor. Both witty and perverse, this author/illustrator lets you see into worlds you never could have imagined existed before he came up with them. You'll be thankful that he did. One of the best pictures in this book is on one of the first pages. There, a turtle cowers into its shell as black eyed pupil-less frogs rise on their lily pads out of the water. The frogs descend, so to speak, on a nearby suburb, and proceed to wreak some minor havok. They disturb a man pausing to eat a late night sandwich. They disturb laundry and enter old ladies' homes to watch a little telly. And they take a great amount of pleasure in scaring a dog that would undoubtedly eat them if it had the chance. As the book ends, the frogs are relieved of their otherworldly powers and hop back to the swamps, leaving only their lily pads behind them. This book received a Caldecott Award in 1992. This book is for ages 4-8.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    great book

    Shawna Wyatt Book Review Tuesday Authored By: David Wiesner This is a story about frogs who realize one Tuesday night that they can float on the air on their lily pads. Illustrations are great and would appeal to children. A teacher could use this book to introduce a science lesson about amphibians. David Wiesner grew up in suburban New Jersey. David Wiesner studied at Rhode Island School of Design.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2006

    Wonderful Picture Book

    This book is a great example of the genre picture book. The author of the book David Wiesner is also the author of the 'The Little Pigs'. The theme of this book is on 'Tuesday evening around eight' the animals in the swamp are seeing all the frogs flying on their lily pads. The frogs fly to town in to a neighborhood to bother the people living there. While in town the frogs watch T.V., get chased by dogs and other exciting things happen while they visit. But, the only problem is that the frogs must go back to the swamp before the morning sun rise. The next day some of the other animals are having some fun of their own. The reading level of the book is from Kindergarten to Fourth grade.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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