Customer Reviews for

Tuxedo Park: A Wall Street Tycoon and the Secret Palace of Science That Changed the Course of World War II

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

For those who love history, but hate the historians way of telling it.

I was OBSESSED with the purchase of this book, since seeing the author on tv (i am not an avid reader). The fact that the author is related to the parties in this amazing, but untold, piece of history even made me want to read it more. Ms. Conant writes in such a way ...
I was OBSESSED with the purchase of this book, since seeing the author on tv (i am not an avid reader). The fact that the author is related to the parties in this amazing, but untold, piece of history even made me want to read it more. Ms. Conant writes in such a way as not to get bogged down in scientific writing, but in the personal tale of her family and those involved. This is the story about the truely gifted and patriotic bunch of genius' drawn together to twart one of the worst regimes in history. Here you see the formation of the secret lab at Tuxedo Park, and while everyone knows Albert Einstein, Neils Bohr, and Robert Oppenheimer; hopefully after this book we will now remember James Conant, and Alfred Lee Loomis. I cannot remember the last book i actually devoured like this. My highest compliments to the author for getting me away from the tv, and into the quiet world of reading this page turner. thanks Nancy Mac

posted by Anonymous on July 2, 2002

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Great Story -- Dull Telling

I doubt very seriously that without her family's obvious connections this author's work would have seen the light of day. A mediocre handling of a potentially marvelous story.

posted by Anonymous on August 6, 2002

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2004

    How The WASPS Prosper

    This is a book that combines an interesting description of life in the 1920's and 1930's with a boring, superficial recitation of Alfred Loomis's involvement with science. The fact of the matter is that Mr. Loomis was extremely wealthy (so as to buy his way into scientific circles) because of family connections and because he engaged in insider trading during the 20's and got out just before the Crash. For instance, Mr. Loomis was stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds during WWI because he was a relative of the Secretary of Defense so a phone call was made.... The author (another relative) justifies Loomis's conduct before the Crash because 'Nothing he did was illegal.' But after the Crash, laws were passed to specifically make what he did illegal. His story, then, is the same as Kenneth Lay with the difference that he has now had a glowing biography written about him. The author seems clueless as to all of this, and it hurts the book that she is apparently too close to the subject to be objective. As to the science, I don't feel the author has any real understanding of what science Loomis was involved in, and, as a consequence, she is unable to describe it to a lay reader. As a result, the latter part of the book reads like a series of press releases describing people running hither and thither. All and all, if you want to read about the science of this era, read 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb,' by Rhodes.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2002

    Great Story -- Dull Telling

    I doubt very seriously that without her family's obvious connections this author's work would have seen the light of day. A mediocre handling of a potentially marvelous story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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