Customer Reviews for

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4
( 691 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(336)

4 Star

(142)

3 Star

(95)

2 Star

(45)

1 Star

(73)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

20 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

A TRUE CLASSIC

I truly thought that the book had one of the best plot lines I've ever seen, reguardless of the fact that there is only slight building up to the climax. The only thing that I didn't think was that good about the book was that about every other page, Jules Verne would g...
I truly thought that the book had one of the best plot lines I've ever seen, reguardless of the fact that there is only slight building up to the climax. The only thing that I didn't think was that good about the book was that about every other page, Jules Verne would go into a paragraph description of the animals. For example, he would say something like: "I just saw a tuna. But not the normal tuna, it was yellow-bellied, had dorsal fins that went at a downward angle, etc." Otherwise, I thought it was a great read and well worth the money. I will be purchasing more of Jules Verne's books very soon. I highly suggest for you to read this book. Another thing, if you enjoyed watching the 1954 "20,000 Leagues Under The Sea Film," I highly suggest the book because the movie only gives a small picture of what actually occurred during their submarine venture and the book tells you everything, and the occurrences are just amazing.
The novel basically tells the story of Professor Arronax, Ned Land and Conseil who get taken aboard the Nautilus and experiences many adverntures, such as going to Atlantis, an underwater hunt, getting trapped in an ice block and much more. This book is and, IMO, always will be a true classic.

posted by 159656 on October 19, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

79 out of 96 people found this review helpful.

Don't buy this book!

If you're going to read one of the great classics of literature¿and you should¿don't pick up this edition. It is a reprint of a version that dates back to the 1870s and was exposed more than 40 years ago for cutting nearly one-quarter of Verne's story and mistranslatin...
If you're going to read one of the great classics of literature¿and you should¿don't pick up this edition. It is a reprint of a version that dates back to the 1870s and was exposed more than 40 years ago for cutting nearly one-quarter of Verne's story and mistranslating much of the remainder. Lewis Mercier was the man responsible for this travesty, yet the publisher tries to conceal what they've done by claiming the translation is by an anonymous hand. An attempt is made to give the volume respectability by adding an introduction and notes by Victoria Blake¿who has no particular credentials for the task. And that leads to goofs¿for instance, she claims Verne never wrote a novel about invisibility, so she mustn't know about the author's Secret of Wilhelm Storitz. In fact, Blake's simply used the better editions that readers are advised to consult. If you want to read Verne's novel, pick up the elegant Naval Institute Press edition, in a modern, complete, updated translation, with commentary by the leading American Verne expert today, Walter James Miller. That book also comes with many of the artistic engravings that illustrated the original French first edition (no illustrations are to be found in the B&N Mercier reprint). Less attractive but more academic is the Oxford Classics version of Twenty Thousand Leagues. Either way, pick one of these to discover this novel, and don't be fooled by the appearance of respectability this book provides. This review is posted on behalf of the North American Jules Verne Society by Jean-Michel Margot, president NAJVS.

posted by Anonymous on February 9, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 95 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 5
  • Posted March 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great Story, check other editions

    I usually love the B&N collections. The introductions included are great many of the times (not always), the annotations are a great saver for the modern reader to be able to decipher most of the "dense" paragraphs that without a background knowledge cannot understand. The questions, inspired by and such sections are usually a great addition as well. And finding all of this in one neat little package is great that my library at home is filled with them. Now with that out of my chest, It's really not worth to read this version of such a great story.
    Jules Verne is known as one of the fathers of science fiction genre and justice was not done to such a great master of words in this edition.

    The story is creative, innovative and breathtaking. There are extremely long descriptions but which really allows the writer to imagine what is on the paper into a reality very clearly. The plot is interesting and the characters develops nicely, always amply supplied by mystery and intrigue. The ending is open-ended which leads to the writing of another novel, which is a must read for any science fiction lovers.

    Invest your money in buying a proper edition of this book without any omitted chapters, scenes, paragraphs and a better translation which will serve you better both personally and academically.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2012

    Big

    The book was so long i could not imagin reading it.Still it sounds good.My nook copy says it is 2000 pages.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2015

    more from this reviewer

    Captain Nemo¿s slow but compelling rise to the surface gives thi

    Captain Nemo’s slow but compelling rise to the surface gives this adventure enough buoyancy to savor the flavor of a Victorian travelogue (and early science fiction progenitor).

    Many who read this classic, very early work of science fiction will complain about the lists. Oh the lists! The countless words, commas, scientific classifications, and rampant cataloging of sea creatures and sea plants. Yes, Verne occasionally provides some curious and interesting descriptions of these plants and beasts to help paint the setting, but many times he simply lists them in typical travelogue fashion (i.e. I saw this, and then this, and then this, and then we saw this eat that.). I count myself among these nay-sayers—to an extent. I’ll admit to having my eyes gloss over the lists.

    That said, I also fond myself perusing the internet to look up some of these crazy beasties and subsequently fall into a loop of YouTube videos to see them in action. Verne did that too. And that’s good writing—making someone want to learn. Even when Verne got some of the descriptions wrong (though he probably had them right for the knowledge that was available at the time), he still opened up the sea to me, just as well as a fantasy writer might create a new world – except I live this world and these things do exist and I can check them out on the internet (or in person if I ever wanted to go the non-virtual route). So, while I did feel the listing went on ad nauseum– it also drew me in at times.

    Verne has interesting characters in his book, which can easily be dismissed as “flat” by the casual reader. Professor Aronnax, the chief protagonist is a true professor at heart. He is drawn into the wondrous scientific adventure unfolding around him and finds it difficult to resist. He’s balanced against the other protagonist, a Canadian Harpooner who is a man of action and common sense that prefers to make decisions based on his instincts. In between them is Conceil, Aronnax’s agreeable sidekick. All these characters seem to fulfill a role and play to their respective typecasts throughout the story. However, they do grow (albeit slowly), even though their actions and words might seem generic at first. The pieces eventually fall in place, and we see that Aronnax cannot rationalize everything for the mere scientific adventure of it all. Land’s cantankerous attitude is fitting, and we watch him struggle when it fully sets in that he is trapped in an environment that stifles his attributes as a hard-working “doer.” In fact, Land’s bitterness and gut-instincts prove to be the grounding force to which Aronnax must cling when things go bad for the protagonists. Even the reticent and happy-go-lucky Conceil makes a transition by developing a bond with the increasingly disagreeable Land–as if he thinks the Professor might be too far adrift in the sea of academia.

    Then there is Captain Nemo. He’s the farthest from flat among all the characters in this book. At first, he is a fearless and seemingly unbeatable force of stalwart principle. Admittedly, Nemo is kept in the shadows for most of the book. He is off screen a lot, and when he comes back on stage it is usually with much bravado. Also, he never really fails in what he does. Yet, the little nuggets of insight, which Jules Verne does reveal, tumble out with significance. These short glimpses into this compelling character paint an inner darkness that is interesting and disturbing. The plot of Captain Nemo, in and of itself is excellent and fitting.

    It’s hard to review this book without at least mentioning how far-seeing Verne was by writing about submarines, tasers, and untethered underwater breathing devices that didn’t exist at the time. This is the stuff of “great” science fiction. These elements of hard science and using the minds creativity to go beyond the limits of contemporary advancements are amazing. What a great mind.

    Oh yeah, there’s adventure too! Verne’s hard science is intermixed with a good number of dramatic conflicts. Sometimes they are simply man versus beast. Other times he pits the men against Mother Nature. Then there is the subtle man versus man conflict between Captain Nemo and his uninvited “guests.” Some of these scenes are downright tense, and they get better and better as the story progresses.

    Verne also had some interesting progressive views going on in this book. For example, the characters make admonishments about over-fishing. Yet, this book is about seamen, so plenty of good fishing takes place. It’s perhaps an interesting conflict, yet a refreshingly realistic viewpoint as these types of issues are not often so black and white.

    The adventure aspect of this story works too. The oceans come alive. Besides his descriptions of underwater flora and fauna, Verne’s description of things like the “Gulf Stream” give you a better sense of the various ecosystems that inhabit this planet and how they fit together—very cool. Like a master fantasy writer, Verne makes the sea seem as foreign and as familiar as a made-up world.

    My only regret is that this is a work of translation and apparently, some of the English translations of this book cut out significant portions of the author’s original work. I can only wonder how the author’s work reads in his native tongue. What did I lose out on? Even still, I enjoyed the work and not just for what it is or given the context of its time. Mostly I enjoyed this story for the traveling undersea adventure that made me want to learn a bit more about the world’s oceans.

    Podcast: If you enjoy my review (or this topic) this book and the movie based on it were further discussed/debated in a lively discussion on my podcast: "No Deodorant In Outer Space". The podcast is available on iTunes or our website.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 25, 2014

    Although it drags on at points (I don't need the classification

    Although it drags on at points (I don't need the classification of every underwater creature), the author does a wonderful job of painting an amazing underwater scene with vivid descriptions.  With interesting characters and a modern writing style that many classic books lack '20,000 leagues' is a must read for every book worm. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2012

    Interesting but slow- paced

    This book is really good and suspensful and full of adventure at the begining, but by page 200 it just gets kind of slow- paced until the finale. Be prepared to put it down for a little when you are bored- but make sure you come back to it, the ending is very good, and kind- of makes you think. Overall i think its a good book, and you should read it if you like a good classic and/ or are an ocean or marine life lover. :-)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2012

    Buying

    They wont lme buy cus im not in usa always only privelleges for US people only ....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Okay

    It was exiting at moments, but others just plain boring. Thats a classic for you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 4, 2012

    Great Read - Average digital copy

    I liked the format. References were interesting and added to the enjoyment of the read. Clasic SiFi was everything I expected. On a sad note: I found a number of words spelled incorreclty and a few run-on words. For example, the word "I" was replaced with the number '1' in some locations. It appears that some mistakes made it through spell check. The book worked well with my Nook Touch.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2012

    A very entertaining read.

    As a kid, I'd seen the movie of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea but had never read the book. I enjoyed reading the introduction and learning about Jules Verne. I enjoyed most of the book; however, there were a lot of scientific names of what the characters discovered Under the Sea. After a while I just glossed over all those names and just read the story. It was very entertaining.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    Awsome

    This is deadly

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    Ok....

    Is this just my nook or are their to copies of this book. Exact to the detail, Barns and Nobel classics, but is one 2.99 and one is free?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    What would u say the age range on it is?

    I havnt read it yet

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2012

    Pretty good book

    It is a good book but sometimes gets boring

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Commet reader

    So....i watched the movie how is the book is it as good as the movie

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    Still a good book

    How many movies were made about this book? Reading the book is always better then the move. Free book for your Nook, so read it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    recommend for your library

    Seen the movie now I would like to read the book and compare. Love the idea that it was free and able to keep for ever. Now I do not have to go to the library to borrow book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 21, 2011

    20,000 Leagues under the Sea

    I still have not read all of it yet... but so far it is an okay book.I am at the beginning where this lady survived a shipwreck. So far it has been a little wordy, but I can understand most of it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    all washed out

    Before actually picking this up my exposure to the story was mostly the seminal movie made way back in the day. And the movie made some much needed corrections.

    First, the overwhelmingly omnipresent science, some of which looks really sad next to modern biology. Assuming I didn't just end up with an extremely poor translation, either way it's dry.

    The action scenes are occasionally well described (trapped under the iceberg) and occasionally effectively skippedover (the attack by the giant octopodes). And the constant switching of measurement standards, he uses everything but Stones and Hands to measure weights and distances.

    Overall, it's not a bad book, but Verne's storytelling here is dry, uninspiring, and kind of boring. Inspiring ideas, to be sure, be execution is lacking. More characterisation would have helped, as is we get hints, glimpses, and conjecture. It gives an air of mystery, but no real ability to sympathize with any of the characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 30, 2010

    potatoes

    living in an underground potato is harder than it seems.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 95 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 5