Customer Reviews for

A Twisted Faith: A Minister's Obsession and the Murder That Destroyed a Church

Average Rating 3.5
( 46 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(13)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

This Author Listens To What We Want

This book was everything I love in a True Crime book. No long detailed investigation and courtroom drama that only reiterates what we've been told previously. Instead, the author explores how a small community church could be so enthralled with their minister that they ...
This book was everything I love in a True Crime book. No long detailed investigation and courtroom drama that only reiterates what we've been told previously. Instead, the author explores how a small community church could be so enthralled with their minister that they would do whatever he told them to do in the name of God. While the main topic of the book is the murder of the minister's wife, the member's of the church play an important role. This book will make you think about how easy it is for a congregation to be taken in by evil. Be sure to check out the website for the book for a discussion guide and the authors website for further discussion posts.

posted by koren56 on April 20, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Boring

This book was really very slow moving. I finished the book but found it a chore to do so. There wasn't enough "story" for the book, it was mostly filler.

posted by Sylvia1120 on July 1, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 9 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted January 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    There is much good about the way the Protestant, Revivalist fa


    There is much good about the way the Protestant, Revivalist faith Traditions “do” church.  In those traditions, the individual is responsible for his/her relationship to God and for how that relationship is expressed in life.  If, however, a person uses the freedom of such a tradition to assert that “God has commanded” certain things to happen, it is also the responsibility of those in that tradition to challenge the validity of those commands.  If the “prophet” (person claiming her/his words are from God) has a strong personality or speaks long or loud enough (or is sufficiently manipulative) such challenges can be quieted with devastating results.Nick Hacheney possessed such personality traits and the folks of Christ Community Church in Bremerton, Washington, suffered the results.  
    Nick Hacheney married the beautiful, reserved Dawn Tienhaara shortly after they met while attending Bible College.  His enthusiasm and passion soon landed him a position as Youth Pastor of Christ Community.  Within a short time of taking that post, he made a deep connection with a “prophetess,” Sandy Glass, in that fellowship. The “prophecies” these two “received” were frequent and vague but were accepted with open hearts by most of the congregants.  When Dawn died in a house fire on December 26, 1997, the church rushed to support their Youth Pastor.  Within a month of this tragedy, Nick was sexually involved with a married member of that Church.By the end of the year, the number would grow to include 3 others, including Dawn’s Mother. When his behavior was eventually questioned,2 years later, it was discovered that Pastor Nick had been “inappropriate” (to varying degrees) with every female (except one) in the church he then served.  By the time he was convicted of Dawn’s murder, two church fellowships were in ruin as a direct result of his actions.
    This book is very well written from the point of view toward exposing the perils of sick religion, unchallenged “pronouncements” in that context and a culture that requires women to unquestioningly be at the service of, and submitted to, the men “in authority over them.”  Mr. Olsen also does an excellent job of portraying how declaring that one speaks for God can be powerful weapon in the hands of unscrupulous users (which has ALWAYS been the case).  Had any of the women found the power, or had been empowered, to speak their own truth-to-power, much of the destruction they suffered would not have occurred and it is possible the death of Dawn Hacheney would have been averted. It is when they do begin to speak their Truth that the destruction ends.  
    The story does not glorify a crime or a criminal. The majority of it is focused on the peripheral players who were as victimized almost as much as was Dawn.  The language is frequently graphic and the description of the crime scene, including the victim, is detailed.
    When any abuse, especially sexual abuse, occurs in any setting, it is tragic.  When the abuse occurs within the context of a trusted community (religious group, civic organization, sports teams, etc.) it cause all such groups to be suspect.  Hopefully, the more such crimes are exposed, the more power everyone will have to speak up when something seems “not right” rather than remain silent for fear of being wrong.  The cost of silence when there is harm being done is paid in human suffering.  The cost of questioning suspected abuse and being wrong is an apology.  The tally sheet seems to be obvious.  

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2010

    Fascinating case

    On December 26, 1997, near the affluent community of Bainbridge Island off the coast of Seattle, a house went up in flames. In it was the shy, beloved minister's wife Dawn Hacheney. When the fire was extinguished, investigators found only her charred remains. Her husband Nick was visibly devastated by the loss. Even though there was evidence that she was dead before the fire started, her death was ruled accidental; even though some speculated that Nick had killed her, there was minimal investigation into the fire and Dawn's death.

    As I discovered with the last Gregg Olsen True Crime account I read, he goes into considerable detail when he writes. His attention to the facts is meticulous and his research is extensive. Reading one of his books is like being lead through a path in the woods, a path with twists and turns, rocks and branches in the path, and holding your hand is a careful gentle guide that doesn't want you to miss a step or stub your toe. Every so often, Gregg gives you a flash of what the future holds, but it just that, a brief glance and you are back to examining events in a chronological order.

    Nick Hacheney was the youth minister, marriage counselor in the church and claimed to receive messages and direction from God. The truth is, he was a philanderer and a murderer and in this account the layers of his deception are pulled away. Many lives and families were damaged by his actions, a community left to pick up the many pieces broken away.

    This book is different from most I've read in that Gregg doesn't cover the investigation or trial. I didn't miss it, since the trail was mainly the testimony of one woman, it would most likely have been a repetition of what was already covered in the book. Despite that it is a fascinating account that covers the lives of everyone involved without being boring or repetitious.

    I got this as an e-book and there were no pictures in it. I have been told there are pictures in the print version.

    I really enjoyed this book and recommend it to true crime fans.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 17, 2011

    interesting and shocking

    Hard to believe there are people that exsist and call themselves christians

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    Makes sense

    Conservative "Christianity" is so patriarchal, and teaches women such submission to male "authority" that we shouldn't be shocked by this fascinating, sordid true tale about a pathological preacher who talks his parishioners into squalor and sin by proclaiming his will is God's.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    !

    Another olsen winning book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1