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Ultimate Fitness: The Quest for Truth about Exercise and Health

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2005

    An amazing book for any one trying to become fit & healthy

    I was very discouraged by one reviewers comments that this book does not address fitness information that is not already 'known.' I agree that the book is geared toward the people concerned about health and fitness, not the professional athlete. That is why I enjoyed it so much, more people can relate to it. The myths that she has addressed are commonly abused by commercialism, thereby confusing the average person who wants to be healthy. I loved this book! Gave it to three people as presents, who have since told me they enjoyed it so much they bought copies for others. This book has great, interesting information to help those who do want to be healthy, not just follow some fad.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2003

    Not what I'd hoped for....

    I was hoping this book would have some decent debate and discussion about fitness. Unfortunately, it seemed to be geared towards explaining some kind of inferiority complex the auhor seems to have. It appeared to me that she would find something about fitness she didn't like / believe, search around until she found someone willing to agree with her view and quote them. Very narrow arguments. And seemed to to be inconsistent. One page tells us how important her and her instructors made it to weigh themselves right after a workout, claiming weight loss, then thirty pages later tell us how one can lose pounds of water through dehydration during a workout. Hmmmm, which is it? (water) I was very disappointed overall. I think she should stick to newspaper columns.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2003

    Interesting, but at times, self-congratualtory

    Definitely worth a read, but the 7 or 8 'debunked myths' were buried in mounds of pages that could be skipped. After the first 10 personal asides, the accounts of the author's personal fitness habits became boring and rather self-congratulatory. Any athlete who reads this book will relate to her stories and 'training' routine, I personally was not as impressed by her personal fitness quest as I was apparently supposed to be. Perhaps I am biased, coming from one of the most intense sports out there, but I was never wowed by her work-out obsession. This book would seem more appropriate for the untrained gym-goer or one who has never competed in College-level sports. Many of the 'myths' the author addresses are old news to athletes who have trained long and hard for competitive sports.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2003

    Ultimate Fitness - reviewed by Michael Wood, CSCS, Director, Sports Performance Group (www.woodspg.com)

    New York Times science writer Gina Kolata hits the nail on the head with her fifth book 'Ultimate Fitness'. As someone who has worked in the fitness industry for 15 years, I found the book extremely interesting especially the 5th chapter titled 'Training Lore'. This is a must read for all exercise physiologists as well as anyone interested in health and fitness.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Read this book

    New York Times science reporter Gina Kolata provides an insightful look at the mythos of exercise. Ms. Kolata is a participant who enjoys working out, but a claim led her to wonder what is the supporting scientific evidence vs. the health industry distortions. Ms. Kolata includes a comparative historical perspective re exercise beliefs over the ages so that readers can see how the ancients compare with other generations to include the information age. The author shreds several of the leading accepted theories from the gospels that low-intensity exercise burns the most fat and that stretching must come before the workout to prevent pulls, etc. Adding to the account is a terse look at the promotion of food and food supplements to lose weight and increase muscle definition.................... ULTIMATE FITNESS: THE QUEST FOR TRUTH ABOUT EXERCISE AND HEALTH is more than a simple expose because Gina Kolata cares deeply about her subject that comes across as genuine especially when she tells her personal anecdotals and those of her daughter. The book is easy to read, can be put down and leisurely returned to, and does not j¿accuse us couch potatoes for failing to save ourselves. Instead even us out of shape, overweight, non-exercisers will find this nonfiction work pleasurable to follow as Ms. Kolata makes it clear that the benefit of exercise at least to her is not losing weight, feeling healthier and fitter, but is in the active participation of playing the game............. Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2009

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