Customer Reviews for

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Average Rating 4.5
( 72 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(43)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Breath Deep Poetry

It was one of those books that you wanted to read over and over again so that you could quote it to everybody you talked to.

posted by Anonymous on April 4, 2003

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Almost the best philosophical novel

When I first read this book I thought it would be one of those best novels that conveys deep and meaningful thoughts. But as I kept reading it the story keeps switching back and forth to different characters and I finally was about to put the book down. The erotic event...
When I first read this book I thought it would be one of those best novels that conveys deep and meaningful thoughts. But as I kept reading it the story keeps switching back and forth to different characters and I finally was about to put the book down. The erotic events of the book some-what kept me going, but for a while the book can be kind of boring. It can drag the reader very slowly to the end and the reader may not know how many of those events relate to the title or the theme. The book is deep, and it requires some deep thinking to understand and connect the events to the title. I personally think that I didn't spend enough time connecting the events into one huge philosophical theme, and I don't think many readers have that kind of time or would wanted to. Overall it's a decent book but since I'm a highschool student my reading level barely matches with the book's. I would reccomend it to those who are high level readers or simply to book-smart folks. I would like to put a warning sign for dim-witted readers who like to read cliche books, almost like me, so 'beware the unknown'

posted by Anonymous on April 24, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 16 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2013

    A warning beforehand , reading Kundera is not a walk in the park

    A warning beforehand , reading Kundera is not a walk in the park for the casual reader. The book is vague with a
    thinly woven plot line but anybody who is sensitive to language and appreciates brainy writing is bound to end up 
    underlining half of the words. It is a book of ideas and characters as opposed to plot. Whilst most readers retain the 
    reasonable desire to be told a story , others balk at the idea of a beginning , middle and end. The novel is a realistic excerpt 
    from the lives of a handful of people. I would recommend it to students of literature and anybody who generally takes an interest
     in heavy literary achievements. This novel does not fit neatly into the subcategory of popular fiction,
    rather, it requires attention , patience and sensitivity. Having said that though , i am only sixteen ,
     and though im a lit student i wouldnt consider the book beyond anybody else's comprehension. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 15, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Forget the film. Read the book.

    I read this book almost 15 years ago and I still get emotional thinking about it. The characters were heart-breaking. I re-read passages over and over, it felt so intimate. I felt like I was invading the privacy of the characters. This book still affects how I feel about life and love.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2007

    Love, lust, revolution, repression, and philosophical digression

    Having seen (and disliked) the movie many years ago, I never thought of reading the book. However, I was pleasantly surprised! The rather cryptic title refers to the author's personal philosophy regarding relationships, which he explains in the book. The story begins in Communist Czechoslovaka prior to the famous 1968 Prague Spring introducing the reader to Tomas, the womanizing doctor, and his future doting wife, Tereza. Firmly determined to never remarry after a painful divorce, he ultimately decides to take Tereza under his protection. Of course, Tomas figures that's no reason to give up his many girlfriends. So, they continue, but Tereza is tormented by Tomas' continous infidelity. The author, Milan Kundera, also portrays his affairs from the side of one of his steadiest girlfriends, Sabina. Throughout the book, we trace the personal histories of these three characters from before the Prague Spring to their separate emigration to Switzerland and their return to Czechoslovakia (without Sabina). We also learn about boring Franz, Sabina's desperate lover. Like other Czech authors, Kundera's book starts off playfully, lustfully. But then it takes on an increasingly serious tone as the characters age and finally becomes almost painfully poignant at the end. The consequences of their earlier frivolousness come back to haunt them as the Communist authorities begin relentless persecuting them, ironically pushing them closer together emotionally than ever before. All in all I surprisingly enjoyed the book. Towards the end, however, the book wanders wildly. (Did Kundera have a page quota to fill?) I recommend this book to anyone interested in Czech authors or personal relationships.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2004

    Not as 'Unbearable' as You Think...

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being is about the sex lives of two central characters, the always horny Tomas and the always confused Tereza, in the middle of 1960s Czechoslovakia. While the Communists are making a mess of the world around them, Tomas is making a mess of Tereza by sleeping around and Tereza is making a mess of herself by questioning life. Through moves as close as Switzerland and as far as Cambodia, they always find themselves back with eachother. Could it be meant to be? Milan Kundera, the author, has an interesting way of presenting his theories of the world to the reader. He does it by intertwining them through the lives of Tereza and Tomas. Kundera gives his interpretations on God, Comunism, love, and war with the help of Tereza's imagination and frequent dreams. Also, the plot twists and turns through the whole story. It frequently jumps through time and changes who it focuses on (kind of like a 'Quantum Leap' thing) and explains different points of views on many of the same topics. It leaves you wondering how the characters will be involved with eachother in the end, and that's the exciting part of the book. You'll have to read it to find out how it ends.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2004

    Great fiction with philosophical meaning

    I rarely read romance novels with such good philosophical ideologies as backbone. After reading it, I reflect on relationships and my expectations of if between what being bearable and unbearable. I also feel fortunate that in the society I live in today, politics and partism do not get into my ways of living; thus as a result, I am not imposed upon by the society the burden of the unbearable lightness of being. It is a great read but it's not easy to digest. It introduces many interesting philosophical ideas. They guide readers to put the meaning of their lives and living in the context of the philosophical ideas involved. As a result, the journey becomes both a reading experience as well as an introspective exercise. I'd like to read it a 2nd time to comprehend in further extent the philosophical thoughts introduced in this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2002

    very interesting

    i think kundera is exceptional. a must read! however,'identity' is my personal favourite.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 16 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1