Customer Reviews for

Understanding SCA (Service Component Architecture)

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Riverspark

    Thank you she meows dipping her head in thanks and respect.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Stormsta

    Yeep

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Darktail

    May i join?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    simpler to code

    The basic aim of the book is well described in its first chapter. It tries to define a standard for writing distributed systems that is analogous to object oriented ideas for writing a single system. SCA builds on its predecessors; notably CORBA and DCOM from the 90s, and Java EE and .NET from the noughties. At this point, if you are a EE or .NET person, you probably agree that CORBA and DCOM were flawed. But you would probably disagree about EE or .NET itself.

    The book argues that those two, while better than the 90s, also have taken on increasing complexity. A multitude of standards like JDBC, JPA, JMS and EJB have flowed in the java world. While the .NET environment also have equivalents to address similar needs.

    Interestingly as a point of sociology, SCA also is deliberately different from how CORBA and EE arose. Those were complex standards put together by official committees. SCA was designed to change quicker, by being at its core somewhat ad hoc industry collaborations.

    If you are a java programmer, the flavour of the book's technical discussion is like an extended foray into the use of java interfaces. Just an analogy. But the explanation of making components that can then be used in services makes this a good one for understanding.

    Also, on pages 72-3 is a very succinct explanation of why EJBs never really took off, due to the performance penalties for remote calls and the complexity of the EJB code. If only the EJB books from 10 years ago had told us!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1