Customer Reviews for

A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

Well done

I don't normally take the time to write reviews but I want to encourage others interested in cosmology and physics to read this book. I am a student at Purdue University and have a deep interest in science. This book was filled with entertaining and profound insight int...
I don't normally take the time to write reviews but I want to encourage others interested in cosmology and physics to read this book. I am a student at Purdue University and have a deep interest in science. This book was filled with entertaining and profound insight into new and possible discoveries in the cosmos. I agree with krauss's annoyance of theologians constantly bringing up " how could there be something from nothing" I experience people on a daily basis that try to be witty and talk against founded evidence and they can be hard to argue with because it feels like a waste of time lol. Well people buy the book, you will enjoy it, thanks

posted by Anonymous on January 28, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

The title question is still unanswered

The author doesn't take long to run into a serious problem by stating early on that "nothing" has every bit as real a physical presence as "something". Oh really? This falls under the category of "not even wrong". The only way he can explain how the universe arose out...
The author doesn't take long to run into a serious problem by stating early on that "nothing" has every bit as real a physical presence as "something". Oh really? This falls under the category of "not even wrong". The only way he can explain how the universe arose out of "nothing" is to assume that "nothing" is a special kind of "something" and then all things are possible. How does a complete lack of existence have any physical presence at all? It implies a relationship that simply cannot exist. This goes way beyond religion or philosophy and demonstrates that humans apparently cannot fathom a complete lack of existence. The author is really saying that something has always existed, but this opens up a major can or worms, so to speak, and he prefers to say that Lucretius was wrong after all and here is all the scientific evidence to prove it. But, alas, the underlying assumption is flawed.

posted by 3750380 on February 6, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    The title question is still unanswered

    The author doesn't take long to run into a serious problem by stating early on that "nothing" has every bit as real a physical presence as "something". Oh really? This falls under the category of "not even wrong". The only way he can explain how the universe arose out of "nothing" is to assume that "nothing" is a special kind of "something" and then all things are possible. How does a complete lack of existence have any physical presence at all? It implies a relationship that simply cannot exist. This goes way beyond religion or philosophy and demonstrates that humans apparently cannot fathom a complete lack of existence. The author is really saying that something has always existed, but this opens up a major can or worms, so to speak, and he prefers to say that Lucretius was wrong after all and here is all the scientific evidence to prove it. But, alas, the underlying assumption is flawed.

    7 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 14, 2012

    Highly Recommend

    This book is a fairly easy to understand explanation of cosmology and quantum physics and how our universe may have began. One of the best books I have read on the subject.

    6 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2013

    Nothing Here to See!

    An interesting read, but I cannot in good conscious recommend it. Dr. Krauss, who describes himself as an anti-theist (not atheist), proudly displays an obvious anti-supernatural bias and a thorough lack of understanding of the essential God as pictured in pages of the Christian Bible. For example, he posits the notion that since God must arrive at moral conclusions in the same way that humans do, by appealing to conscience and logic, we can dispense with the need for a moral Law Giver as the ultimate source of human morality. The point that Krauss has missed is that God doesn't appeal to logic or conscience to conclude that rape and murder are wrong; rather, God's nature is inherently moral and good, such that things like rape and murder, which contradict God's nature must therefore be wrong. Besides, when man appeals to his own human logic and conscience, the possibilities for evil seem boundless. Does the murder of nearly 60 million pre-born babies in the United States since 1973 really sound like a good and moral thing? Yet with our national conscience supposedly intact, we tend to treat it as if it were.
    Of course it is possible that God does not exist, but as a scientist, the intellectually honest thing for Dr. Krauss to do would be to consider all possible explanations, even those that initially appear far fetched, and to eliminate possibilities only after the evidence clearly warrants. Regrettably, Dr. Krauss appears to have allowed his desire that there not be a God (a position he freely admits to having) influence how he interprets the evidence of apparent nothingness. Though probably quite sincere, his explanations of the nothing that must exist in order for our magnificent universe (or multi-verses, as Krauss often suggests) to come into being, sounds uncannily close to being something, just something we don't yet fully understand. In fact, at certain points in the book the author seems to be saying that something can come from nothing if you first allow him to redefine what "Nothing" is. Even the brilliant (by his own estimation) evolutionist Richard Dawkins who provides the afterword for the book, confesses that he doesn't fully understand his colleague's explanations. Perhaps that is because there is very little here to understand, and instead of a book honestly examining one of the great mysteries of science, what Dr. Krauss has given us is a convoluted bait and switch, elegant and sophisticated at times but when it's all said and done, just a con. In the end, after nearly 200 pages, the reader is still left with nothing.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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