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A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

Well done

I don't normally take the time to write reviews but I want to encourage others interested in cosmology and physics to read this book. I am a student at Purdue University and have a deep interest in science. This book was filled with entertaining and profound insight int...
I don't normally take the time to write reviews but I want to encourage others interested in cosmology and physics to read this book. I am a student at Purdue University and have a deep interest in science. This book was filled with entertaining and profound insight into new and possible discoveries in the cosmos. I agree with krauss's annoyance of theologians constantly bringing up " how could there be something from nothing" I experience people on a daily basis that try to be witty and talk against founded evidence and they can be hard to argue with because it feels like a waste of time lol. Well people buy the book, you will enjoy it, thanks

posted by Anonymous on January 28, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

The title question is still unanswered

The author doesn't take long to run into a serious problem by stating early on that "nothing" has every bit as real a physical presence as "something". Oh really? This falls under the category of "not even wrong". The only way he can explain how the universe arose out...
The author doesn't take long to run into a serious problem by stating early on that "nothing" has every bit as real a physical presence as "something". Oh really? This falls under the category of "not even wrong". The only way he can explain how the universe arose out of "nothing" is to assume that "nothing" is a special kind of "something" and then all things are possible. How does a complete lack of existence have any physical presence at all? It implies a relationship that simply cannot exist. This goes way beyond religion or philosophy and demonstrates that humans apparently cannot fathom a complete lack of existence. The author is really saying that something has always existed, but this opens up a major can or worms, so to speak, and he prefers to say that Lucretius was wrong after all and here is all the scientific evidence to prove it. But, alas, the underlying assumption is flawed.

posted by 3750380 on February 6, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2012

    Well done

    I don't normally take the time to write reviews but I want to encourage others interested in cosmology and physics to read this book. I am a student at Purdue University and have a deep interest in science. This book was filled with entertaining and profound insight into new and possible discoveries in the cosmos. I agree with krauss's annoyance of theologians constantly bringing up " how could there be something from nothing" I experience people on a daily basis that try to be witty and talk against founded evidence and they can be hard to argue with because it feels like a waste of time lol. Well people buy the book, you will enjoy it, thanks

    16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 31, 2012

    A Synopsis of A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing`

    Our best science tells us that the universe is an ever expanding entity consisting of some 400 billion galaxies that began with a very powerful and very hot explosion from a single point precisely 13.72 billion years ago. The degree to which our best science here has advanced in the recent past is reflected by the understanding of the universe that we had just a century ago. At that time, it was thought that the universe was static and consisted of just one galaxy: our own. In the past 100 years, though, Einstein's theory of relativity revolutionized how we understand space and time and the physical processes operating at the very largest of scales, while quantum mechanics has revolutionized how we understand these processes at the very smallest of scales. It is the development of these theories in particular that has provided us with our current understanding of the universe.

    However, the picture of the universe that these theories have furnished us with still leaves us with an apparent problem: What existed before the big bang? Surely something must have existed beforehand, for if nothing existed then something (indeed everything!) came from nothing, which seems absurd. Indeed there are few things more intuitively implausible than that something can come from nothing. In the philosophical community ex nihilo, nihilo fit (from nothing, nothing comes) is appreciated to be a self evident premise, and one of only a handful of postulates that are completely indisputable.

    The apparent contradiction between the universe beginning at a finite time, and the premise that something cannot come from nothing, has often been used as an argument for the existence of an uncaused cause, or creator (most often understood as God). However, in his new book `A Universe from Nothing: Why There is Something Rather than Nothing' renowned physicist and cosmologist Lawrence Krauss argues that a full understanding of the science that has yielded our current picture of the universe also allows us to see that something can indeed come from nothing. Thus, for Krauss, science can in fact do the work that it is often thought only God could manage. As Krauss puts it (borrowing a line from the physicist Steven Weinberg), science does not make it impossible to believe in God, but it does make it possible to not believe in God (p. 183). In introducing us to the science that allows for the possibility of something coming from nothing, Krauss takes us through the history and evolution of physics and cosmology over the past century, beginning with Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in 1916. In the course of this journey we learn about what our best science says about the basic make-up of the universe (including the existence of dark matter and dark energy), as well as what our best science tells us about how the universe (likely) began and where it is (likely) heading in the future.

    For a summary of the main argument of the book, as well as many of the juicier details to be found therein, visit the blog at newbooksinbrief daught wordpress daught com, and click on the article entitled 'A Synopsis of Lawrence Krauss' 'A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing'.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2012

    Would definitely recommend. I had a whole review typed up but of

    Would definitely recommend. I had a whole review typed up but of course Barnes and Noble would ask me for a pen name and when I put in a pen name, it refreshed the page... never mind then.

    This book describes very descriptively, yet pragmatically why a flat universe (which is the type of universe we inhabit as it turns out) can arise by quantum fluctuations for it has zero total energy.

    Like -500 + 500 = 0, this is the same concept for the universe. Because of this, it does not violate any physical laws. He also states that it is almost inevitable for there to be a multiverse, which will suggest answers to the existence of physical laws. As our knowledge of the universe grows, hopefully one day we can arrive at conclusions such as an eloquent theory of quantum gravity and a full picture of the cosmos (or meta-cosmos at that).

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 31, 2012

    A creationist's worst nightmare - highly recommended!

    For anyone with even a vague curiosity about where our universe actually came from (without the need to resort to a "creator"), this book is a must. It updates us with the latest state of the sciences of cosmology and particle physics, told in a readable style, and made understandable to those of us not endowed with a "brain the size of a planet" (to quote Marvin). It also provides plenty of factual fodder for use at parties when "debating" with creationists. A universe from nothing, and no creator too, imagine.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    A lot to chew on here!

    Ok, I just finished reading it for the second time. I think I got it! I would like to read more about this subatomic world of existence and non existence over very small time frames. Wild stuff for sure. Talk about an 'uncertainty principle'! This book does bring it more into what you may call a comprehensible realm. The concept of 'nothing' becomes more 'real'. I think that the thoughts in this book also help with the 'multiverse' concept as well. Well done. A thrice read would not be out of the question.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 1, 2014

    A must-read for any science-enthusiast. 

    A must-read for any science-enthusiast. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    Wbsv&&$&%$$'$%%254%wqf sgsv%%%%%$





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