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An Unwilling Bride

Average Rating 4
( 29 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

I love this book!!!! I am extremely happy that it is now availab

I love this book!!!! I am extremely happy that it is now available as an eBook. I know many people have problem with Lucien and his aggressive behavior. However, that one flaw does not in any way ruin this book.  

posted by neelie86EN on November 3, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

18 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

Domestic violence is somehow romantic?

The male lead in this book, Lucien (a marquess -- son of a duke) finds out that his mother had an affair with another man, resulting in his birth. His legal father, the duke, who has been cold and unemotional toward Lucien his entire life has now discovered that he (the...
The male lead in this book, Lucien (a marquess -- son of a duke) finds out that his mother had an affair with another man, resulting in his birth. His legal father, the duke, who has been cold and unemotional toward Lucien his entire life has now discovered that he (the duke) has an illegitmate daughter. In order to keep the succession 'pure' he blackmails this daughter, Beth, into marrying Lucien and bearing children. The duke does so by threatening with ruination the school her adoptive mother runs (and therefore Beth and Aunt Mary will become destitute). Lucien is threatened with the withdrawl of all unentailed properties. It's actually a pretty standard Regency fare except for two features: Beth is quite a 'bluestocking' -- in fact she is a proponent of the 'radical' writer Mary Wolstencroft (which has no bearing on the story except to create forced tension since Beth willingly abnegates every principle Wolstencroft espouses on women's rights, inc. the right to safety, once Lucien says he loves her). The second feature is the regular employment of threatened or real physical violence against Beth by Lucien. He does in fact put his hands around her throat at one time and on another occasion 'backhands' her across the room. This absolutely ruined the book for me and I would urge no one to read it unless you are a wife abuser looking for new ways to intimidate your victim. I don't understand why anyone in this day and age would write such a blatant justification for domestic violence (of course Lucien is 'sorry', of course Beth instantly forgives him and thinks he will never do it again and tells everyone she 'fell') in a 'romance' novel. I find it quite disturbing that the author and publisher reissued this book intact, without changing any of the violence in the original version. Reading about a female lead being abused is not romantic. In fact, the story is in some ways a case study of what happens when a vital, intelligent, educated woman is put into a situation where she is abused -- she loses all integrity and self respect and identifies with her accuser. Whatever happened to her passion for Wolstencroft and her defense of the rights of women to happiness and safety? Gone, gone, gone, along with human dignity and skin free of bruises. And Beth is not the only one to do this -- Lucien's parents have been estranged since his birth and after 20+ years his mother makes the first move to reconcile. The father confesses that he had never come back to her bed for fear that she would have another son and he would have to kill Lucien or otherwise make him disappear (but in the same breath goes on to say that he loves Lucien). Her response to that is , 'oh that's ok, I don't think you would have done it and it's moot anyway since I'm past menopause now.' They they rush off to bed. Let me get this straight -- a man who has emotionally abused your son has now confessed that he would planned to kill him or make him disappear for the sake of a pure succession and your response is 'Let's have wild sex?' Stop, don't buy this book.

posted by Anonymous on June 25, 2002

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2002

    Domestic violence is somehow romantic?

    The male lead in this book, Lucien (a marquess -- son of a duke) finds out that his mother had an affair with another man, resulting in his birth. His legal father, the duke, who has been cold and unemotional toward Lucien his entire life has now discovered that he (the duke) has an illegitmate daughter. In order to keep the succession 'pure' he blackmails this daughter, Beth, into marrying Lucien and bearing children. The duke does so by threatening with ruination the school her adoptive mother runs (and therefore Beth and Aunt Mary will become destitute). Lucien is threatened with the withdrawl of all unentailed properties. It's actually a pretty standard Regency fare except for two features: Beth is quite a 'bluestocking' -- in fact she is a proponent of the 'radical' writer Mary Wolstencroft (which has no bearing on the story except to create forced tension since Beth willingly abnegates every principle Wolstencroft espouses on women's rights, inc. the right to safety, once Lucien says he loves her). The second feature is the regular employment of threatened or real physical violence against Beth by Lucien. He does in fact put his hands around her throat at one time and on another occasion 'backhands' her across the room. This absolutely ruined the book for me and I would urge no one to read it unless you are a wife abuser looking for new ways to intimidate your victim. I don't understand why anyone in this day and age would write such a blatant justification for domestic violence (of course Lucien is 'sorry', of course Beth instantly forgives him and thinks he will never do it again and tells everyone she 'fell') in a 'romance' novel. I find it quite disturbing that the author and publisher reissued this book intact, without changing any of the violence in the original version. Reading about a female lead being abused is not romantic. In fact, the story is in some ways a case study of what happens when a vital, intelligent, educated woman is put into a situation where she is abused -- she loses all integrity and self respect and identifies with her accuser. Whatever happened to her passion for Wolstencroft and her defense of the rights of women to happiness and safety? Gone, gone, gone, along with human dignity and skin free of bruises. And Beth is not the only one to do this -- Lucien's parents have been estranged since his birth and after 20+ years his mother makes the first move to reconcile. The father confesses that he had never come back to her bed for fear that she would have another son and he would have to kill Lucien or otherwise make him disappear (but in the same breath goes on to say that he loves Lucien). Her response to that is , 'oh that's ok, I don't think you would have done it and it's moot anyway since I'm past menopause now.' They they rush off to bed. Let me get this straight -- a man who has emotionally abused your son has now confessed that he would planned to kill him or make him disappear for the sake of a pure succession and your response is 'Let's have wild sex?' Stop, don't buy this book.

    18 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    This book was the worst I've read

    There were no grounds for romance. Throughout the entire book the two characters matched wits and argued. It was awful and with 30 pages left to read there is nothing that is entertaining in it whatsoever. I can't imagine the last pages will somehow make the book a good read. I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. I don't know how it even got published.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2014

    NO!

    The hero of this book is not a hero at all. He handles Beth like he has no sense & of course she takes it like a dumb ass. There is nothing about either one of them to be recommended, this book was a waste of $$$$$.:(

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