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The Waiting Place: Learning to Appreciate Life's Little Delays

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Sort by: Showing all of 17 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted August 24, 2011

    A good read for busy people

    I didn't really know what to expect having never really read collections of essays apart from at university. I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed reading this.

    The book is a collection of essays about the waiting places that we find ourselves in throughout the different seasons of life: from student years, to dating, to marriage, to children, and all other areas in between. What really appealed to me when reading this is how separate all the essays are from each other. Some days I didn't have much time to read so I could only read one essay, but it didn't matter and didn't interrupt my flow of reading. However, on days when I had slightly more time to read, going from essay to essay didn't feel too detached.

    I liked the very personal element to this book as well as its easiness to read. Although it was lighthearted, the seriousness of some of the chapters cannot be understated - some of the essays were about very serious issues and were still easy to read and I was definitely able to connect with the writer.

    Overall a good read for busy people!!!

    Thomas Nelson publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book. I was not required to write a positive review.

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  • Posted July 20, 2011

    The Waiting Place By Eileen Button

    I don't know about you. But I love waiting. Of course, I hate queues, but waiting is altogether a different matter. You can bring fun into the process of waiting by taking a book with you, wherever you go - whether a wait is expected or not.

    Instead of a book, you may use a music player, or a mobile games console, or paint in your iPad, or simply observe people around you. Whatever may be the technique, with the right attitude, wait time can become very rewarding and enjoyable.

    Eileen Button's book "The Waiting PLace" is a very unique work, which contains a collection of essays about waiting. She uses various everyday scenarios where we wait, and tries to describe precise experience from those moments.

    When you write about waiting, the challenge is, you will have very few 'characters' and very little 'incidents'. You may have to rely on your thought process and capture it in writing with as many details as possible. On the flip side, it may be VERY boring for others.

    Eileen doesn't seem to have this problem at all and describes even the tiniest experience in an enjoyable manner. Me being a fellow-wait-lover, I was able to see myself in the book and love every waiting opportunity. It was a delightful reading experience and I won't mind reading it again, next time I am waiting on a train station queue!

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze dot com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted July 8, 2011

    The Waiting Place Review

    I really enjoyed reading this book by Eileen Button. She takes your hand and leads you through her life, finding the joy in waiting in the hard places. This collection of essays brings into the light the trials of waiting for an uncle's death, for a child to breathe, or for a friend to chose what to eat. Her humour leaps out at you from every page, making this book a wonderful for one to read in bite sized pieces.
    I think the stories that I enjoyed the most were the ones about the pain of the church being your husband's work, and her long journey with her child born unwell. Not all of the essays are so good, but I'm sure there's one there for everyone.
    Please note: I wrote this review for BookSneeze's blogger review program. All opinions are my own.

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  • Posted June 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    waiting...

    This book is recommended for people who are finding it hard to understand the very concept of patience through all the confusion of daily life. Through a collection of essays that are more like memoirs of her life, Eileen Button presents us with various ways that our lives resemble being in a 'waiting place'. She writes in such a way that makes it feel like you're merely having one of those random chats with a random friend over a cup of tea.

    It has made me laugh, cry, and feel a whole lot of other emotions through both the author's entertaining way with words and the insightful thoughts and ideas contained therein. It is the perfect companion book for when you're riding the bus to work, waiting in line at a grocery store, or just basically anywhere we need to take a number and wait our turn.

    It reminds us that while we may not often understand the workings of God's ways, it really does pay to just sit back, relax and wait for life to take its natural course. I give it 4 out of 5 stars.

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  • Posted June 28, 2011

    Like sitting down with a friend- fantastic book.

    I must admit that I was not at all prepared for the way "The Waiting Place" would pull at my heartstrings


    Based on actual life experiences, the author shares several very intimate experiences from childhood into adulthood. These stories are written almost the same way you would write in your diary. Some things she writes about are not "life-changing" (although several are), but they prove the point that life is not one big action packed movie. There are times in life when the tempo slows and we are left with no other options except to wait.

    Through quite a few good chuckles and definitely some tears, the author is able to convey that we all spend time in a waiting place. Sometimes we pass through and other times we are stuck there for years.

    I did not feel like I read this book. I feel like I sat down each evening with Eileen Button and a cup of coffee to have a chat with a friend. I was a bit sad to finish the book because I will miss those evening "chats".

    Maybe that is what led me to be a tad disappointed with the ending. Then again, most true stories do tend to have a let-down ending because we are so use to fairy-tale endings. I don't know what I expected; I just wanted more.

    Overall, I would definitely suggest this book to a friend. It is warm and a great reminder that we all experience ups and downs in our lives. It reminded me how much I appreciate those closes to me and how much we NEED each other.


    "The Waiting Place" is a book that I highly recommend you check out.



    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    If you're not living the life you'd dreamed you would...

    For a while now I've been looking for voices like mine within the Christian writing community; primarily authors working creatively with memoir. In Eileen Button I've found a teacher. Her book The Waiting Place is filled with tender and provocative, loosely connected essays, all personal reminiscences, detailing moments spent in waiting.

    Button is unusually gifted at painting scenes: her family home, the NICU where her son spent his first days, the waiting room at the WIC office. Each essay constructs a new world within which to experience the pain, frustration and peace potentially found in expectation.

    I connected powerfully to Button's experiences partly because they are artfully shared and partly because our experiences themselves are shared. Button and I are both preacher's wives, both adjunct instructors, both mothers of young children, both academic overachievers, both writers. We're alike. (I bring up our similarities only to say that perhaps my enjoyment of her book has much to do with my strong association with her life.)

    By far the best content in the book is related to the birth of her third child, a complicated, scary, faith-testing period of anxious waiting. Button describes this ordeal with powerful simplicity and sometimes racing, sometimes wandering prose. It's delicious, warm, and endearing.

    Other essays in the book aren't as winning. Perhaps because Button is vulnerable and fully herself. No one is perpetually likable.

    The only fault in Button's book is one too large to ignore: no underlying story arch. Each essay stands alone, and while Button indicates this as her intention, the lack of momentum still disappoints. At the end of the book, I wanted to see progress, to see Button learning as she waited so that the last moments of waiting would differ greatly from the first. I ached to see waiting done well.

    I also wonder, just wondering, if perhaps the title and idea of waiting weren't inserted after the stories had been collected in attempt at an angle.

    Overall, I enjoyed the book (I greatly enjoyed Button's voice), and I'd recommend it to any preacher's wife, mother, or woman struggling to juggle the life she wants and the life she's living.

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  • Posted June 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Honestly and Beautifully Written

    The Waiting Place by Eileen Button is one of those books that you don't intend to read in one sitting, but happily find yourself staying up way too late to finish. This collection of essays is beautifully written, both humorous and poignant when it needs to be. I found myself reflecting on various 'waiting places' in my life while enjoying the insight and refreshing honesty in which Eileen shares hers.

    The author walks us through various times when her life felt as if it were on hold- and at times she admits that she is barely holding on through it all. What makes these stories so lovely is the way that Eileen shares personal insights and revelations about experiencing God in the midst of her waiting places. She is candid about her feelings and takes us through an emotional journey, riding waves of joy, laughter, tears and heartbreak as she honestly reflects on life. From fishing moments with her father, beauty lessons with mom, visits with various grandparents and the birth and death of family members, Eileen covers all the moments that can take you for a loop and make you wonder what God is thinking!


    I wasn't sure what to expect from The Waiting Place, as I have struggled with the stagnant periods in my own life. I am so thankful to have read this book and had no clue how easily I would relate to the moments the author chose to share. I feel as though God used these stories to tell me to deliberately slow down- to enjoy this period of my life and stop straining towards to future. It is with heartbreaking clarity that The Waiting Place reminded me how often I wish away today to get to tomorrow. Today is a gift, and Eileen Button writes an inspiring narrative reflecting this very truth.

    I would highly recommend reading this book, no matter where you are in life's journey.

    Disclosure of Material: I received this book free from the publisher via Book Sneeze. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2011

    Good Book!

    In Eileen Button's work The Waiting Place: Learning to Appreciate Life's Little Delays, she talks about all of the different ways in life people wait. They wait for funerals, signs, miracles, the mail, acceptance, breakthroughs, and growing up. These are just a few of the twenty-two topics which are looked at within the book.

    I thought this book had a cute concept, in that each chapter is a self-contained short story which looks at the above mentioned issues that most people, at some point in their lives, find themselves waiting for. The book was an easy, entertaining read, and I would recommend it to others who need to slow down and be content in the waiting place they are currently at in their lives.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 10, 2011

    What a magical way to look at "waiting"

    What a magical way to look at life from The Waiting Places! By the fifth paragraph Button had me literally laughing aloud! With each essay, each chapter brought something new to my mind, whether it be a memory or a thought of what the future holds. I enjoyed turning these pages as I laughed and cried alongside Eileen and her family as she told her stories. If you've ever found yourself stuck in a place where you were waiting for the next phase, this book will help you to put life into perspective; learn to live while you wait. I was awed by this compilation of essays of Button's life, you will be too! Pick up your copy available now!

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  • Posted June 10, 2011

    Finally...something to do in your waiting place!

    Eileen Button has captured in 227 pages a connection between herself and the reader and a connection the reader will no doubt feel between himself/herself and every human being in the world. We may live in different countries on different continents but we have all been to the same place at one time or another (sometimes several times in one day) - the waiting place. Think of all the places you wait - at a red light, in traffic on the highway, in cue waiting for your popcorn after waiting in line to buy your movie tickets and the doctor's office to name a very few. Most people would agree that this waiting time is pretty useless - in some instances, you cannot veer to the left or leave - you're stuck waiting. But does this time have to be a waste? Eileen Button does not think so. She has found the simple pleasure and oh yes, even humor in "the waiting place". Like the old adage "great things come in small packages" likewise a similar takeaway from "the waiting place" - while waiting maybe you reach out, speak to the person beside you and make a new friend or you brainstorm a solution to a problem you are currently experiencing or .. the possibilities are there if you are open.

    She includes stories in "waiting for" the day to end, a place called home, the fish to bite, a baby's healing, church to be over, a husband's return, children to grow, a mother's acceptance and a loved one to die.

    This book definitely put waiting in perspective. It does not have to be lost time but found time. I found the book to be inspiring and eye-opening. Everyone who reads the book will be able to relate to and take away from at least 1 "waiting place". This book would be great for individual reflection, book clubs or getting together with friends and discussing over a coffee..instead of saying "oh my doctor kept me waiting an extra 20 minutes because he was overbooked."..maybe you will be able to say "while waiting in the doctor's office, got chatting to the person across from me and found out she is a Coronation Street fan too and we had a nice talk about the latest scandal to hit the Street".
    As Eileen says, "To wait is human. To find life in The Waiting Place, divine."


    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.

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  • Posted June 9, 2011

    Good Read

    This collection of short essays by Eileen Button seemed as though I had snuck into her room and read her diary. Eileen shares her heart with the reader, approaching a variety of topics including being a pastor's wife, having a seriously ill child, death in the family. Each essay touches on the way each situation required waiting - waiting on fish, waiting on God, waiting on others. The essays are written very honestly, nothing is held back.

    I loved the opportunity this book gave me to peek into the life of a fellow Christian wife and mother; Button's sheer honesty made this book super relatable. From viewing the church as her husband's mistress to coping with being "just a pastor's wife," Eileen shared her heart and soul with the reader. If you're in the market for a book that you can totally relate to, this is for you. Button helps the reader to realize that not everything about life is peachy keen, there are seasons we all go through and it is very normal. I walked away from this book feeling enlightened, enouraged and just a bit more "normal." :)

    Disclaimer: Thomas Nelson Publishers provided me a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Posted June 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Waiting - It's what we all do.

    he book was very enjoyable. Although I found some occasional feminist ideas throughout. Written by Eileen Button she provides a look into her life. From childhood to her present days. She offers encouragement to her readers. She celebrates life which is full of (waiting) (Quote) To wait is human. To find life in the waiting place, divine.

    Life is full of occasion where we must wait which is hard for so many of us running around, rushing through life, trying to get from one place to the next in a hurry. Waiting slows us down , gives us breathing time, and on occasion time to look around and enjoy where we are.

    I had a little difficulty with this book as I am in no way a feminist in any form and some things suggest a hint of it here. But some of the stories will make you laugh, some will make you cry, but it will teach you of life's delays and how to appreciate them.

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  • Posted June 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Recommend Book For Life Lessons

    I enjoyed this book and felt I learned a beautiful story from it. the author tells her life story in the book. Normally I don't like life stories and don't get much from them but this one is like a friend sharing something important they learned in life. You learn from the story itself. I wish the author had given us some steps or a way to apply what she learned to our own lives, but even though she didnt, I still fell like I can extract some of life's lessons from the book. It is like learning from another person's mistakes and successes. So we can also learn to find God and listen to him and wait for him and see him in all the places in life. I would recommend this book to others because of the life lessons and examples it sets forth.

    I received this book from the publisher for free for this review but I really did gave my honest review.

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  • Posted June 2, 2011

    Poignant Memoirs on Waiting

    When I first chose this book, I expected it to be a guide: a kind of how-to for Christians who find themselves in a position of waiting. In actuality, it is a collection of autobiographic stories and essays from various "waiting places" in the author's life. I was caught off guard by the author's conversational, informal style (using phrases like "wicked dark" for example), but in the end, this manner of writing helped me connect to the author in a human way. While I found one essay ("Lessons in Humility: I am waiting for my dignity to return) insulting and condescending, overall I felt a tremendous amount of affection for the author. She has a personal style and a distinctly human style. She never became a caricature or pretended to be something she wasn't, which made for a compelling read as I began to care for her and watch her develop. In that way, this book stands out among the Christian genre: there is no pretentious façade of "the pastor's wife", only a real person with real struggles. Somebody you want to go out to coffee with. The Waiting Place: Learning to Appreciate Life's Little Delays is a tremendous book when it's presented as-is: not a how-to or guide, but a memoir of sorts, the recollections one gathers through life. It's wisdom given in stories, not bullet points. Humorous and sorrowful, sardonic and insightful, this book will appeal to all who have wondered how to make the best of waiting. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255

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  • Posted June 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Hilariously Humorous Book

    As humans, we spend most of our time waiting, waiting for our sweet 16 birthday party, waiting for our graduation, waiting for our aunt to marry her boyfriend, waiting to get married, waiting to go to college, waiting for the person in front of us to finish checking out. In this sweet, tenderhearted book full of life's humorous tales, life's trials, and most of all, life's waiting places. Eileen Button demonstrates through her own life stories, showing readers how to make the most of the waiting places, and rather then wish them away, to savor them happily.
    This book is one of a humorous nature, bound and determined to make readers laugh to themselves. Although extremely fun to read, one must agree that this book would be most beneficial when it is read by a married adult. One must enjoy her witty sense of humor and understandable circumstances, all the while looking upon the essays with a knowing heart, seeing the resemblances in her life and theirs.Overall, one can expect to laugh, to cry, to sympathize, and many will undoubtedly love this book, along with it's troubled tales, hilarious happenings, and sincere stories. In the meantime, enjoy your waiting place!

    P.S. Book Sneeze gave me this book for free to honestly review.

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  • Posted May 31, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Waiting Place

    The Waiting Place by Eileen Button contains very enlightening stories. It made me think of my own life where there's so much delays has been imposed on me and sometimes, I feel as if I could scream in agony, dissatisfaction and injustice.

    But in 'The Waiting Place', we're all taught on how to be patient and submit to God's will, for whatever that had happened, surely happened for a reason, and more often than not, the reason is to show us truth and the evil around us so that we all could be more aware of our environment and learn whatever lesson that we must learn.

    This book is absolutely fantastic, and I learn quite a deal from it. Highly recommended to people of faith who feel as if they need to find inner peace with themselves by not just making peace with people around them, but by being more aware of their surroundings.

    I rate this book 4 out of 5 stars. I received an ARC of this book from Thomas Nelson Publisher in exchange of an honest review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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