Customer Reviews for

Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy

Average Rating 4
( 59 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 60 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy

    Carlos Eire makes you laugh and he makes you cry as he recounts his early childhood in Havana "before the world changed." What was it like to grow up in a privileged family in Havana before Fidel Castro? What was it like to wave good-bye to your mother and father as a ten-year old and to leave your homeland (along with some 14,000 other child-refugees) to live in an orphanage in Miami? What is it like to live as a professor at Yale, longing to let go of the pains of the past yet passionately clinging to who you are deep in your soul, a Cuban, waiting for redemption both personal and national? Read Waiting for Snow in Havana.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 20, 2011

    Great Read!

    Engaging and well written. The colorful language and vivid recollections make this book very enjoyable & worthwhile. I highly recommend this book although I'm not sure I want my young boys reading this because there are way too many "ideas" for them and their friends to get into trouble! Entertaining, funny & heart wrenching at the same time! Loved this book!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 30, 2010

    A ribbon of remembrance

    Carlos Eire delivered a poignant, yet complex, memoir told in many vibrant tales about his childhood and subsequent exodus from Cuba in 1962. In 1959, Castro sent troops to oust then President Batista which led to an unstable political climate.

    Eire, as a son of a somewhat quirky, but wealthy, judge with an imaginative mind who believed himself to be a reincarnated Louis XVI, sent his sons (Carlos and Tony) to an elite school. When Castro came to power, all of the little luxuries suddenly became quite dangerous to openly possess. The decision to airlift his sons out of Cuba in a program called Operation Pedro (Peter) Pan must have been a difficult one.

    Once in America, Eire passed through a series of foster care homes and it was some years before the mother was able to be reunited with her sons. They never saw the father again. The honest anger and emotion comes through loud and clear as does the longing for a homeland he had to leave behind. When Eire writes, "in the past 38 years I've seen 8,917 clouds in the shape of the island of Cuba" the reader can't help but feel the depth of his grieving.

    Eire, with a PhD in History and Religion from Yale, has shaped these words into a prayer to his lost childhood.

    Highly recommended.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 16, 2011

    Reading it for the second time

    This book is the best of both worlds. It's non-fiction that reads like fiction. The writing is rich and beautiful. Highly recommend it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    As a student of Cuban history, having studied at the university

    As a student of Cuban history, having studied at the university of Havana, I found this book infuriating. I think that the book serves only as an interesting insight into the biased and often inflexible perspective of the Cuban diaspora in the US.  The idea of Batistas cuba as a "paradise" is absurd and the conjecture that the revolution has spoiled the cuba that could have been is even more so.  If you would like to inform yourself about cuba both past and present I recommend educating yourself fully on the islands fascinating history, you will also learn quite a big about the US in doing so. This book is not a good source for information regarding the effects of the revolution on cuba as a whole but rather an interesting insight into one mans personal experience and how his life has shaped his memories and perspective. 

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Great book to read if you're interested in Cuba

    Enjoyed the book as I am ttraveling to Cuba. Like the details as to what it was like after the Revolution---the changes that happened. I was more interested in that than the details of Carlos's daily life before the Revolution, but it made an interesting story even though I would have preferred more details about the Revolution. The book is banned in Cuba,

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    Wite fang

    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ thies are the most best BOOKS EVER

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2011

    Deciding to purchase this book...

    Just viewed a TV program about the " Pedro Pan " Cuban children that fled into the US in the early 60's as Carlos Eire being one of them. Just his comments on this program gives me less reasons to consider reading his book because he seems to be stuck in that trauma of his childhood and the vision of the Cuba that could have been. What he needs to do is move forward and find better ways to help the Cuba peoples' stuggles. The reason Cuba is not free is that the Cuban people are not willing to shed their blood for the ultimate sacrifice at ending that regime!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2010

    Pretty bad..

    I could not get past the writer's constant references to 18th Century France and how his family were the Bourbons in a previous life. I bought the book to read about Cuba, not some far-fetched fantasy. To confess, I read exactly only FIVE pages, so this review is quite biased. You know, if you just emigrated to escape Fidel, it does not add up to a story worth telling. There must be more to that...

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2008

    Grandiose in Childhood...

    Although the author is recounting of his time as a child in Cuba, he interjects his adult perceptions into the story giving the child a much more mature perception than is believable.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2007

    Paints a beautiful picture of an incredible place

    Being of cuban decent, I am eager to read anything I can that can give me information on the country I originate from. This book is incredibly well written and describes in detail the love for a country and the heartbreak we have all felt post Fidel. I couldn't put the book down.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2006

    draining

    As a Floridian i have a passing interest on Cuba. I have many Cuban friends and was looking forward to this book. It actually made me angry. The author was a spoiled, whiny rich brat in Cuba and continued to be a whiny brat in the U.S. I admire how he made something of himself in the U.S. but come on. Many of us suffer tragedies and setbacks that we must overcome. His story was no more fascinating then someone that has lost a parent or been abandoned by a parent. I did not find him likable at all. He was born to wealth and had it taken from him. Boo hoo. Save the drama Carlos. All in all you have had it pretty good. Not a good book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2006

    Beautiful

    A bitterweet memoir of a time gone by. Eire writes with such passion and honesty that one cannot but help feel his affection for the Cuba of his childhood and his anger for Castro and the Revolution. Well written and powerful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2006

    Dragging myself through

    I read (most of) this book as part of a book club selection. It was enthusiastically recommended by someone who really connected with it. She raved about it. For that reason, I dove into the book wanting to like it. While the stories told within were interesting at times, I got a little tired of the reptile explosions and similar anecdotes. While the author paints the characters well, it just fell flat for me - I put it down with no desire to return. I made myself pick it up again and again to keep trying, but finally lost interest. If you are from Cuba or have a close connection to the country, perhaps you'll enjoy it - it seems to be either something people really love, or don't embrace at all. The latter was true with our book club. It just didn't go over well with the group - and we're a pretty diverse bunch.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2006

    Brought Havana To Life

    Wonderful recreation of a time and place known to my friends but not to me. Enjoyed reading about my part of Miami being mentioned by name and the time period I had heard about before. Mr. Eire had a wonderful and courageous mother.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2006

    It could have been better

    I was brought up in Cuba so I looked forward to this book. I was born after Castro took over and never experienced Cuba before the revolution. I was fascinated by his family stories, and the freedoms he had that I never had nor imagined were possible. Private schools were unheard of and switching schools was not an option. My confusion came when I was attempting to put the events in chronological order in my mind. The book skipped around quite a bit. It was difficult for me to put pieces together in relation to the history of the country. All in all it was a good read, but it could have been better.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2005

    Excellent Read

    Eire writes with a bitter sweet attitude about this terrible transition from the Cuba of his youth to the Cuba of Castro. He captures the beautiful hearts of Cuba's people and of their once beautiful country. I laughed with him, I cried for Cuba.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2005

    The Snow Never Comes

    This story of a young boy in Cuba and his games, friends and youngstr's view of the political situation is fascinating, especially when you consider how long it has been since America decided Castro would not last - and he is still there, and this boy got out but lost his country and his father.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2005

    FANTASTIC!

    This was a truly amazing book to read. Carlos is a wonderful writer, who managed to relate his experiences as a child at the beginning of Castro's regime in a way that touches your soul. Having only seen the run-down Havana that exists today, 46 years after Castro took over and destroyed his country, I now have a better idea of what life was like when that country was still free and 'normal.' The pain and desperation Eire experienced during this horrible transition to communism come to life in the pages of this wonderfully written book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2004

    If only there were a million stars!

    Wow! That is all I can say. Carlos really captured the essence and beauty of Cuba before the Revolution. I felt like I was right there, beside him pelting rocks at his friends. Awesome book, go read it right now!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 60 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3