Customer Reviews for

Walden and Other Writings

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2002

    Transcending your expectations

    Walden is an incredible feat of self-reliance, truth and discovery through nature, and independence. Never have I ever experienced-yes, experienced, not just read-such a unique, cultivating work! The story of Thoreau withdrawing from a busy society to the serene embrace of the woods will calm, soothe, and enlighten you. I derived more realizations about life and nature and connected more with this book than any other. If you need a life revitalization and a purging of irritating cynicism, submerse yourself in the embrace of Walden Pond.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2002

    The great American solitary's poem to nature

    I feel a bit humbled at approaching this great work, this true American classic. Thoreau is the great solitary ,Emerson's disciple and soul- mate in one sense, and a man alone in commune with nature , in another. He sees and observes the world precisely and these precisions become metaphors and these metaphors become moral insights and with them he reads the book of the world. His world , the one he found within himself by withdrawing from the noise of the world around was rich in a kind of aphoristic poetry "There is no day to dawn and the sun is but a morning star " is a typical flash of his brilliance . It is possible of course to ridicule the great pioneer who went a few miles from home to get away from it all, to ridicule too the man who did not make the kind of connection in love with another human being which is in some sense essential to the highest life. But Thoreau who does hear the sound of his own drummer , and who does have the courage to by being more right than his neighbors be a majority of one is a unique voice and among the few great American originals who can live as example and ideal for mankind. His book is a celebration of sight and insight of a time and a world few of us are still able to see. He walks alone and in his walking he opens before us another stretch of brighter and better worlds still to come.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2002

    Calm and Peaceful

    I truly enjoy reading this book. I'm not done but it is so calm and written wonderfuly. I hope you will read this book! If you like poetry or would like to chat sometime email me!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2002

    The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation

    Walden was poorly received upon its publication and Thoreau died in relative obscurity but its message ought to be heeded by more Americans. Just how big of a house, car, etc. do you really NEED? What is the essence of happiness? How has mankind become enslaved by 'conveniences'? All of these questions Thoreau dared to ask at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Thoreau died in relative obscurity because, with apologies to Apple, he dared to 'think different[ly].' Read Walden and you may too.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2001

    Look at the meaning, not the text!

    I read this book, and it was fairly tedious to read (Thank g-d I'm done). At any point, the content may seem irrelevant while reading, but in the end, after pondering, its all there. Thoreau was participating in a 'philosophical experiment,' which was to see if he could survive by himself and how it affected the person mentally and physically. In the end, Thoreau failed, finding out that human nature through his experiments showed him humans need to live with contact with other humans. This philosophy can be applied to any species, but for what it is worth, this book is a classic book with tedious content, but a noble experiment well documented

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2001

    An interesting book that shows the ways the simplicity

    I thought that this book was a good book because of Henry David Thoreau's aspect on simplifying his life to such an extent that nobody back then would probably think about doing. Then he took it a step further and published his thoughts about it. This book showed the story of Henry trying to seek simplicty, and truth by living in the woods by himself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2000

    Brilliant.

    Brilliant.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2000

    Details help visualize this book.

    In March of 1845, Henry David Thoreau, 'borrowed an axe and went down to the woods by Walden Pond,' where he spent the next two years, living as simply as any one man could. So begins the remarkable story, 'Walden.' Thoreau lives in a house, which he builds himself, by Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts. His closest neighbor is more than a mile away, but Thoreau never feels alone. He fills his time hoeing his beans, fishing, making conversation with people passing through the area, and most importantly, 'living deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach.' Thoreau keeps a simple diet of beans, fish, bread, and water from the pond. He spends countless hours just, 'watching the changing of the seasons,' and is absolutely content to do so. Nowhere is there a book, which commands as much respect for the author as 'Walden.' <p> In 'Walden,' the detail of environment is extremely important. Thoreau starts his new life in the spring of 1845. He chooses to take residence near Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. We see the aspen trees, small hills, dense forests, and open meadows, all of which are filled with various types of wildlife, surrounding the pond. Thoreau does an extraordinary job of describing the surrounding area. He describes the trees as being 'tall arrowy white pines, still in their youth.' From atop a nearby hill he beholds, 'a pleasing vista southward across the pond, through a wide indention in the hills which form the shore there, where their opposite sides sloping toward each other suggested a stream flowing out in that direction through a wooded valley, but stream there was none.' Of the abundant wildlife he observes that, 'the partridge and the rabbit are still sure to thrive, like true natives of the soil, whatever revolutions occur.' These observations are key to Thoreau's description of his home.

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