Customer Reviews for

A Walk Across the Sun

Average Rating 4.5
( 252 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

28 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

A Must Read

Those of us not familiar with the sex trade, me being one of those, usually think of it as happening “someplace else”. The reality is that it happens all over the world, including right here in the United States. Children are sold for drugs, prostitution, kidnapped ri...
Those of us not familiar with the sex trade, me being one of those, usually think of it as happening “someplace else”. The reality is that it happens all over the world, including right here in the United States. Children are sold for drugs, prostitution, kidnapped right off of the street. Before you go any further in this review you need to know that this is not a feel good topic. It is repulsive and hard to read.
We start off the story with two innocent girls whose life is decimated due to a tsunami. They try to get to their school where the sisters will take care of them. Things go wrong and they find themselves where no young person should ever be, in the sex trade. Thomas Clarke is a lawyer who has lost so much already. He witnesses a kidnapping of a young girl in a park and this sets him on his mission to work against these traffickers.

This story moves along smoothly carrying the reader from one heartbreak to another. It is a very emotional book to read. It lets you see inside the head and heart of these people who sell children for sex. I think it was best said when one of the characters said to the young girl he had with him, “You are not here because I enjoy the sale of sex. You are here because men enjoy the purchase of it.” (page 329)
I thought about that remark. If we could get rid of all of the people who were willing to pay for this service then we would not have the sex trade.

As the author took us across India we get a look at the different caste systems and the way they treat people. Both of these girls were middle class students who knew English. This made them more valuable than many others. The author doesn’t leave the reader in a depressive state. He definitely wanted to give the reader hope that this situation can change in the future. This is a must read book. If nothing else you as a parent should read it to see what you need to protect your children from.

Corban Addison is able to give a voice to the victims of human trafficking. Without that voice people like me know nothing of it. We live in our safe little world. After reading this book my world doesn’t feel so safe anymore and it isn’t as small as it once was.

posted by skstiles612 on January 8, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

This book is a tough read. The subject matter can make your skin crawl and the hairs on your arms will rise. There are more ways to create a human slave than I had ever imagined. There is no end to the number of people who will prey on the innocent.

The book is mainly about two main characters, sisters, aged 17 and 15, Ahalya and Sita. Before literally being cast adrift by a tsunami, in their home town in India, they led charmed lives in a lovely house with loving, educated and successful parents. Afterwards, all ...
The book is mainly about two main characters, sisters, aged 17 and 15, Ahalya and Sita. Before literally being cast adrift by a tsunami, in their home town in India, they led charmed lives in a lovely house with loving, educated and successful parents. Afterwards, all of their family, all of their servants and friends are suddenly wiped out; they are completely alone. While trying to get to their convent school and safety, they are kidnapped and sold into human bondage, disappearing; one young woman’s life soon begins as a sex slave and the other as a servant.
Many of the girls that are sold have been captured because of their naivete. They answer questionable ads, run away from home in search of a better life, escape to raise money for poverty stricken or ill relatives. Regardless of their motives, they are all abused and terrified of their captors who show them no mercy and treat them without any consideration for human needs. Reading this, I could feel my blood pressure rise because of the horror the young women were exposed to and because of the despicable nature of the men who abused them. These young, inexperienced girls were in no condition to fight their captors. In order to stop this trafficking, the users of these services should be punished, along with the pimps and the kidnappers and the brothel owners; anyone involved in aiding or abetting this practice should be put away forever. How they turn a blind eye to their complicity in this crime is incomprehensible.
Although the book could have degenerated into a sex crazed story, with elaborate descriptions of rape and physical violence, the author let the story move the plot along rather than the titillating descriptions, which are the meat and potatoes of many novels today. The more explicit scenes are left to the reader’s imagination. The narrative is suspenseful and very exciting. The story is filled with twists and turns which will hold the reader's interest while at the same time educate the reader about this abominable trade that can only exist because there are so many depraved men supporting it.
The main problem with the book is the number of failed rescues; there were just too many near misses. They tried to include every different kind of human trafficking possible while at the same time, the author seemed intent on protecting and keeping the teenager, Sita, safe from the actual consequences of her captivity, the actual moment of the rape which would make her a courtesan or worse. Either all law enforcement is corrupt and inept or the author wanted to portray them that way to keep the story going on. One thing is for sure, there are corrupt politicians and law enforcement officers who allow this to continue. There is an underlying love story, complete with betrayal, which moved the plot along and moved the characters to the countries they needed to be in order for the tale to play out.
The confluence of many events occurring at just the right time, and for just the right reason, appeared a bit too serendipitous, at times, but it held my interest completely; its human interest tugged my heartstrings. It is at once sad and painful, as it is also hopeful and joyful.
It is obvious that the author knows this subject well and while the story may go off on one too many tangents, on occasion, the book deserves to be read. the book deserves to be read. The crime and shame of human trafficking always remains the main theme that the author wished to expose and expunge.

posted by thewanderingjew on February 19, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    The book is intended to handle a very scary yet real topic of yo

    The book is intended to handle a very scary yet real topic of young girls being kidnapped and being sold to prostitution. However the writing is trite and tedious.  The author works hard to educate his readers that he has studied and knows India: going at length to describe a highly unlikely breakfast that the young girls eat at the beginning of the book to telling us the meaning of Priya's name: the story wanders painfully and is reminiscent of B grade Bollywood movies.  Reading this book was a total waste of time  

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  • Posted February 26, 2012

    Good book

    This book was very good, describing abuse of women and their rights both abroad and in the U.S. and an unlikely hero who helps save a fraction of them. It's scary to me if this is still going on.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    Wow

    Hfeck fos tjis work

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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