Customer Reviews for

War Letters: Extraordinary Correspondence from American Wars

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2003

    Incredible!

    I had the opportunity to meet Andrew Carroll in Madison at the Wisconsin State Historical Society. He was introducing the book and was later signing copies in the lobby. One of my father's (Michael Jeffords), letters is in the book and he was a guest of honor at the signing. Andrew was very concious of the sacrifice these people made for their country's beliefs and I think he did an incredible job putting the book together. It gave me an even greater respect for my father and let me get an idea, albeit a limited idea, of what he went through in DaNang in the mid-Sixties.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2002

    Moving

    This book was so sad to read, when you learned they died shortly after writing it. But yet, it was a book that I couldnt drop until I finsihed it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2002

    Great read

    One of the best books I have ever read..A great way to experience history from a veterans viewpoint. Don't miss this one!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2002

    Great reference

    I'm a History major at SDSU, so I picked this book up hoping it would reveal something new about all the wars I had been told about throughout my short little life. What a change of pace. It was so interesting. You become attatched to those who wrote the letters and if you found out they died later in the war, it was heart-wrenching, almost as if you knew them. If you're tired of all the "love stories" and "miraculous recoveries" involved in war, read this. It brings you down to earth and helps you appriciate this country

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2002

    Extremely Moving

    This is an incredible book!! It was a well-rounded example of human experience mixed with history. I found myself mourning the loss of the letter writers and rejoycing when they did make it home safely. Thank you for putting these personal letters together for all of us to read. I would recommend it to anyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2014

    awesome, heartfelt, informative these are just some words i can

    awesome, heartfelt, informative these are just some words i can use to describe this book. WAR LETTERS was written by Andrew Carroll, it is not his only book about the wars that the U.S. has gone threw. Andrew Carroll graduated from Columbia university with a bachelors in arts and history. this is a nonfiction book because it takes letters written from veterans who at the time were active duty soldiers. Andrew Carroll founded the legacy project in 1998 which was created to preserve the correspondents of our veterans. WAR LETTERS cover multiple wars including the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf war, Somalia, and Bosnia.i believe the theme of the book to make sure we don't forget those who sacrificed so much for me to write this letter and play under those Friday night lights and know i am safe. this book really brings you into the mind of the veterans."when the others came up and almost put their guns against his breast and head it all most made me sick"Charles Bingham said to his wife about witnessing the execution of a deserter. there are many examples like this threw out the book. all in all i loved this book and would recommend it to everyone. now it might not be everyone's cup of tea but i have known that i wanted to serve this country since i was eight so i found it to be a very good read and it gave me a thought to how war might feel and what i am going to want to say to my loved ones threw letters just like these. i really like what Carroll was doing with writing this book, he wanted to make sure we didn't forget what these people have gone threw. whether your cup of tea or not i still recommend reading this book because it is a good read and you never know you might end up liking it even if you are not into war type books.     

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    I picked this fascinating book up while working as an government

    I picked this fascinating book up while working as an government contractor in Iraq in 2004. I was heartfelt as having served in Desert Storm/Shield. I know I have written letters home to my wife and family which was from my heart and state of mind at that time. I now work with wounded warriors from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars; who writes poem as a form of therapy. I encourage them to purchase this book and maybe oneday their letters and poems will be published and remembered. Great read a collectors item!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2003

    Great Book

    This book was a very good book. The letters were very good and heroic. It showed good courage through the american soldiers and what they did through the civil war and the persian gulf

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2001

    Amazing!

    This is an amazing book. I loved it. I learned more about the history of our nation by reading this book and learning of the PERSONAL history of those involved in war than I ever have before.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2001

    Welcome to war

    Let me start this review by confessing that I am biased. One of my letters from Vietnam is included in the book. I therefore view the book differently from the average reader. I also got an advance copy of the book a week before the official release date, and was able to read it. Andrew Carroll produced this book by reading through almost 50,000 letters and selected roughly 200 that best show what everyday life in the military - and in war - are like from the viewpoint of the average soldier, sailor, marine, and airman. Andy was able to get these letters by persuading Dear Abby to publish an appeal in her column on Veteran¿s Day in 1998. The column urged readers to contribute these letters so that the sacrifices of the writers would not be forgotten. The result was a flood of 50,000 letters ¿ some faded, some muddy, some blood-stained, and one pierced by a bullet. One letter was written on Hitler¿s personal stationary by an American sergeant who worked in Hitler¿s personal quarters in Germany just after WW II. What could be a better symbol of justice? The letter writers¿ views are very different than the views you will get by reading the memoirs of a general or an admiral. When I was in the Army, there was a wonderful comment that explained life in the Infantry: ¿The general gets the glory, The family gets the body, and We get another mission.¿ Your view of the military ¿ and of war - changes depending on your position in this food chain. Overcoming an enemy machine gun is an interesting technical problem when you are circling a firefight in a helicopter at 1,000 feet. You take a very different view of the problem when you are so close to the machine gun that your body pulses from the shock wave of the muzzle blast. These letters were written by soldiers while they were in the military. They are describing events that happened that day, the pervious day, or the previous week. Their memories are very fresh. Their views also are very different from the views that someone might have when writing his memoirs thirty years later. In thirty years the everyday pains, problems, and terrors could very well be forgotten or become humorous. The book groups these letters by war or police action. There are sections for letters from the Civil War, WW I (the war to end wars), WW II, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, and Somolia/Bosnia/Kosovo. Some things never change. The Civil War letter writers grumble about poor food, tiresome marches, mindless sergeants and incompetent officers. The Vietnam letter writers (myself included) grumbled about the same things. One anguished letter was from an officer in Vietnam who was torn by his need to hide his opposition to the war for fear of demoralizing his men. At the end of the letter is a brief comment explaining that the officer stepped on a mine and died shortly after writing this letter. Welcome to life in the military. Welcome to war. You should read this book if you w

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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