Customer Reviews for

War in Heaven

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2007

    This Also is Thou

    This is my favorite of Charles Williams' seven novels which include Many Dimensions, Shadows of Ecstasy, Descent into Hell, The Place of the Lion, The Greater Trumps, and All Hallow's Eve. It's not usually the fave of other Williams fans, so I'll say why I like it. Along with Many Dimensions and Shadows of Ecstasy, it's the easiest to read, and I reread it nearly every year the way other readers do Tolkien. Williams dragged most of his interests into this novel: detective stories, the occult, the stages of mysticism, and mythic history--here of Prester John, the Guardian of the Graal. It also illustrates one of Williams' favorite maxims, 'believe and doubt well'. He likes supernatural things to happen to atheists and skeptics, not settled believers, as did C.S. Lewis (That Hideous Strength). While not a dualist, he yet exults in contrasts and following out opposite paths. Williams is anti-gnostic and considers matter substantial and real. Yet the supernatural world is always crowding at the corners, and mortals are always on the brink of being translated into the realm of joy at the heart of the Holy Trinity. Williams' novels always strain against language even as they are carried by it, and Williams often lapses into explanation, as if he were a bystander on the scene and not the narrator. Critics consider this a fault, but in War in Heaven it allows the Archdeacon to move in and out of the action, as it were, the scenes going in and out of focus, from a fog to crystal clarity. Were this a movie, it wouldn't need an alternative ending, it already has two, or three, or five, depending on where you look. And then it ends like a Dr. Who episode, all neat and tidy, everything back where it began. Or is it?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1