Customer Reviews for

Water Walker

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Life was just settling into normal. Alice was just beginning to

Life was just settling into normal. Alice was just beginning to understand what normal actually was. She had no memory of the beyond six months ago and had spent those months in an orphanage. Until John and Louise adopted her. Until they gave her a normal. Then the man ...
Life was just settling into normal. Alice was just beginning to understand what normal actually was. She had no memory of the beyond six months ago and had spent those months in an orphanage. Until John and Louise adopted her. Until they gave her a normal. Then the man showed up and shattered that illusion. Nothing would ever be normal.




Claiming to be her father, the man, Wyatt, kidnaps her and takes her deep into the Louisiana swamplands where he lives with his wife, Kathryn, and his mentally disabled son. Alice—her real name is Eden, supposedly—was taken from Kathryn as a baby because Alice’s birth father was a powerful politician who didn’t want to acknowledge an affair. Now Wyatt was appeasing his wife and restoring his family.




But Alice—Eden—soon discovers that things are amiss in her new household…and there’s absolutely no escape from it. Until she meets Outlaw.




As always, the story is nail-biting and page-turning. Dekker has a way of presenting readers with his characters’ shoes and coaxing us into them. Just use her eyes for a moment will you? You feel the characters and hurt with them. You begin to understand their motivations and desires and longings. That’s important for a novel like this, because Dekker’s ultimate goal is transference. Do you have eyes to see? Place a character over here, connect with her, draw her extreme situation into your reality. You get sucked in not just because the story is good but because you are invested in the character because, in a way, you’ve become the character.




Dekker’s overall theme here—one that he makes no effort to conceal—is that of forgiveness. It would give away too much of the plot to tell specifics, so let me concentrate on the theme. Dekker speaks of forgiveness in a way that few ever do. And that’s a tragedy, because he’s one of the few that’s got it right. Forgiveness requires sacrifice. To forgive a debt is to absorb the loss, to sacrifice. Why did it take Jesus’ death to forgive sin? Because the debt had to be paid, the penalty had to be absorbed, and the one who forgives is the one who must sacrifice. It’s a radical concept, but Dekker takes it a step further. Forgiving like that, forgiving like Jesus, that’s the most freeing thing we can do.




There are two types of novels. The first are amusements just for a time: beach reads, throwaway thrillers, formulaic mysteries. They might sell millions of copies and make lots of money and have lots of fans and be turned into movies, but in reality they suck. Not in terms of story, but in terms of time. They suck your life away. You lost two hours, four hours, six hours reading that and you’re nothing better for it. That’s not this novel. Water Walker is the second type of novel, the kind of novel that changes people. Superficially, all can be just about the same. The story is still there, fast-paced and thrilling, but there’s a depth to it that makes you think. It’s the kind of novel that leaves you thinking as you try to fall asleep at night, the kind of novel that breathes life into you and will change you, if you let it. Water Walker is an excellent story. But it’s also more.

posted by SupermanJMO on February 18, 2014

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Ted Dekker in his new book, ¿Water Walker¿ Book Two in The Outla

Ted Dekker in his new book, “Water Walker” Book Two in The Outlaw Chronicles published by Worthy Publishing takes us into the life of Alice Ringwald.




From the back cover:  “My name is Alice Ringwald, but the man who kidnapped me says that’s a lie. He calls me Eden a...
Ted Dekker in his new book, “Water Walker” Book Two in The Outlaw Chronicles published by Worthy Publishing takes us into the life of Alice Ringwald.




From the back cover:  “My name is Alice Ringwald, but the man who kidnapped me says that’s a lie. He calls me Eden and says he’s taking me to be with my mother.  But my mother, like everything else in my past, is dead.  Or so I thought.”




Thirteen-year old orphan Alice Ringwald has no memory beyond six months ago. The only life she knows is the new one she’s creating one day at a time with the loving couple that recently adopted her and gave her new hope.




That hope, however, is shattered one night when a strange man comes to her door. Her real mother is alive, he says, and begs her to return home. When Alice won’t leave with him, the man forces his way into the house and abducts her.




In a frantic manhunt the FBI pursues, but the man slips through their fingers. He and Alice vanish without a trace.




So begins Water Walker, a modern day parable that examines the staggering power of forgiveness, and reminds us that it’s possible to live free of the hurt that keeps our souls in chains.




I am sorry to say that I didn’t like this book as much as the first one.  When there is a kidnapping and an FBI manhunt I expect great thrills and excitement. Instead I got a zealot compound where they are brainwashed.  Not really my cup of tea.  Ted Dekker does a wonderful job on the themes though.  Truth and forgiveness are delved in with clarity and insight.  If you want to know who you really are you need to get out of the boat and walk on water.  And the only way to do that is walking with God. 




Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Worthy Publishing for this review.  I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

posted by VicG on March 14, 2014

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  • Posted March 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    The Review: Where do I begin?  There is so much I want to say ab

    The Review: Where do I begin? 
    There is so much I want to say about this book, Water Walker by Ted Dekker. The author's language and wording, his primary themes, his intermingling of light and dark, the characters and their voices, the bondage and freedom aspects - these things stood out in a very big way. The role of each person in the story and how they played their part in the conclusive end, or rather in a more precise beginning was haunting. I was literally stunned speechless with how it all played out.
    This book was no easy read, in my opinion. It was well-paced, of course, but the movement was...complicated. Not complicated in a hard way. No, not at all. I guess I could say that it was like an organized and complex chaos. There were so many messages and lessons weaved into the storyline. Scripture references were constant and served to steer me toward a greater understanding. That helped to open my mind to where Dekker was obviously (and yet not) trying to take me.
    I think anytime anyone reads this book they will walk away with something different every time. Perhaps, they will focus on forgiveness, love, grace, or mercy. Maybe they will focus on choices, consequences, spiritual warfare, or new life pursuits. All I know is that they will walk away changed. 
    Rating: 4.25/5Recommend: YesTone: Mixed Cliffhanger: YesStand Alone Read: Yes (Note: Suggest readers consider reading book #1 of The Outlaw Chronicles)Themes: Love, Forgiveness, FaithBookshelf Worthy: Yes
    A complimentary copy of this title was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The words I have expressed are my own. No form of compensation was given to me. I was not required to write a positive review. I have shared my thoughts for your consideration. (less)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 10, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Thirteen year old orphan Alice Ringwald has no memory beyond six

    Thirteen year old orphan Alice Ringwald has no memory beyond six months ago. The only life she knows is the new one she's creating, with the loving couple that adopted her and gave her new hope. That hope, however, is shattered one night when she is abducted by a strange man. In a frantic FBI manhunt, he vanishes. So begins Water Walker, a modern day parable that examines the staggering power of forgiveness and reminds us that it's possible to live free of the hurt that keeps our souls in chains.

    Most of the story is the kidnapping and descriptions of Kathryn’s bizarre religion. Alice was just settling into her new life with her foster parents when a stranger, Wyatt, comes to their door and announces he’s her father. With only six months of memories and limited life experience, Alice offers little resistance when Wyatt kidnaps her and takes her to her birth mother who lives on a compound stringently controlled by Zeke in the middle of a Louisiana swamp. Alice becomes the centerpiece of their religion, spending numerous hours in ritual cleansings and surrounded by a multitude of rules.

    This story is part of a series but can stand alone and be enjoyed; the main theme is that of forgiveness, a story of love, discovery, and secrets yet to be told with lots of twists. If you are a fan of Dekker you will enjoy this book.

    I received copy of EBook from Net Galley, FirstLook program from Worthy Publishing for my review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2014

    Good book on Forgiveness

    I like this series of books. I am probably the only one to think this, but it drives me nuts that Ted always brings everything back around to Showdown. If I knew that's what this was I wouldn't have bought it.

    I would like something to actually be a book for itself. There have been a few that I have really enjoyed and then he goes back to something related to Showdown. I really enjoyed Three, The Bride Collector, Boneman's Daughters, The Priest's Graveyard and The Sanctuary. I look forward to more of those.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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