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What Do You Care What Other People Think?: Further Adventures of a Curious Character

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Anyone wanting to understand why the Challenger exploded in 1986 should read this!

Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize winning physicist, died in 1988.

Two years prior to his death, he served on the Rogers Commission which investigated the Challenger explosion that killed seven people including civilian Christa McAuliffe. He refused to allow it to be a ...
Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize winning physicist, died in 1988.

Two years prior to his death, he served on the Rogers Commission which investigated the Challenger explosion that killed seven people including civilian Christa McAuliffe. He refused to allow it to be a whitewash. Having received a tip about the temperature on January 28th, 1986, he determined the O-rings failed since the rubber would not maintain its shape at low temperatures.

He demonstrated the failure of the rubber at a press conference by taking some of the rubber used for the O-rings and placing it in ice water which is 32 F of course. It came out misshapen.

He conducted a personal investigation separate from the rest of the commission. He also fought with the commission when he wrote an individual assessment of the program. Unless it was included in the report, he refused to sign on the report.

His experiences with the Rogers Commission along with the censors who would read incoming and outgoing mail at Los Alamos in included in this book.

posted by 6137028 on October 31, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Overall, this book is really different compared to the typical b

Overall, this book is really different compared to the typical books a teen would read. In all honesty, I wouldn't recommend that you read this if you do not have any interest in the Challenger Disaster. In contrast to his first book, "Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Fey...
Overall, this book is really different compared to the typical books a teen would read. In all honesty, I wouldn't recommend that you read this if you do not have any interest in the Challenger Disaster. In contrast to his first book, "Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character" this book for the most part revolves around the Challenger Disaster (as previously stated). Regardless, this book is still a great read if you love a writer with a sense of humor. Feynman's writing style is witty, and he just doesn't really care about speaking what's on his mind. His writing style is similar to Suzanne Collin's (Hunger Games Trilogy author). Although Collins speaks through the use a character, Feynman is his own character. Both capture what is inside the character’s minds, giving the reader a deeper understanding of the story as a whole. If you’re a fan of the way The Hunger Games was written, you’ll definitely enjoy this book. Feynman also includes some very moving stories, as well as some funny ones. Giving that this is a compilation book, it is very well written in the sense that all the stories thread together and flow nicely to create a big picture at the end. By the end of the book, you’ll feel like you really knew Feynman, and you were with him every step of the way! All in all, I strongly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in space and NASA, or to someone with a similar sense of humor and personality to Feynman!   -Cat D. 1st

posted by Anonymous on March 24, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2014

    I really liked this book. It was well written and nicely put tog

    I really liked this book. It was well written and nicely put together. He is very funny and a good writer. Overall good experience with the book. 

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  • Posted December 13, 2013

    Highly recommended

    I purchased this after watching the TV movie about the Challenger disaster. I was surprised to find that Dr. Feynman is a very enjoyable author. I will be reading more of his books and I'm sorry he's no longer with us.

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  • Posted June 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Feynman's last musings

    Richard Feynman is one of the most famous twentieth century Physicists. He is one of those rare scientists who have managed to go beyond the success in the narrow confines of his field of research and become a public celebrity. A big part of this success comes from his persona which combined incredible brilliance with the irreverent and down-to-earth attitude to most problems in life, be they "big" ones like working on the atomic bomb, or the everyday ones that almost all of us are familiar with. It's the latter ones and his quirky and unorthodox approach to them that made Feynman endearing to the general public.

    His earlier book "Surely You're Joking Mr. Feynman" was a classic and an inspiration to generations of young scientists who were shown that you can have lots of fun while pursuing a life in science. I myself had read it in single sitting, and had completely been mesmerized by Feynman's wit and irreverent attitude. "What Do You Care What Other People Think" is a further collection of stories and anecdotes from his life. Some of these had been told by others over the years, but in this book they all come together in a single volume as told by Feynman himself. Some of the events and stories presented come from the last few years of his life, and it is hard not to feel the poignancy of the fact that these were some of his last thoughts on subjects and situations that he cared about.

    Almost half of the book is dedicated to the investigation of the Challenger disaster. Feynman was on the presidential commission that investigated that disaster, and here we get a full insight into what had been going on during commission's session. Many reports have made it seem that Feynman had single handedly figured out the true cause of the disaster - the faulty o-rings that were not meant to be used in really low temperatures. In this book he sets the record straight and explains that although he was the public face that brought attention to the o-rings, there had been many people behind the scenes who had suspected a problem with them for quite a while. This part of the book is also a very useful and revealing glimpse into the workings of a big governmental and scientific agency like NASA.

    The book concludes with few musings on the responsibility of science for social problems. In these musings Feynman turns uncharacteristically philosophical, even almost spiritual. He might not have been the most sophisticated thinkers in these matters, but his instincts were very acute and well worth listening to.

    All of those who appreciate Feynman's work and brilliance will be grateful for this honest and easy-going narrative. It is also hard not to think that with Feynman's passing a whole era of Physics had come to an end. Those of us who think that somewhere along the way theoretical Physics had lost its way and had become a caricature of its former self, may wonder if all of that could have been avoided had Feynman lived for another ten years or so. We'll just never really know.

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  • Posted February 8, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    What do I care what you think?

    Richard Feynman has lived his whole life following one ideal: not caring what others might say about him. Feynman recalls his previous endeavors in life such as growing up with his wife Arlene and the investigation of the Challenger's explosion. In his examination of the explosion, Feynman has trouble using the methods provided by the committee. Feynman utilizes his own methods, disregarding others' opinions, and is the only one who finds substantial information on the tragedy of the shuttle launch. Mr. Feynman did a terrific job of sending the message that no one can dictate your life, except yourself. The mystery was solved through Feynman's deductive reasoning instead of the Washington-media route, which involved endless public meetings and no actual work was accomplished. As a future engineer, I was quite entertained by the way Feynman applied his knowledge to the real world. I recommend that anyone else who enjoys logical reasoning to solve problems will not be able to put this book down. The only setback was the skipping around on the time-line. Mr. Feynman often jumped around, which introduced new people who were unknown to the audience. Halfway through, the read became smoother and stuck to one subject. I strongly recommend reading Feynman's first book "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" to get a full grasp of his adventurous life. Overall I believe his life story deserves a strong applause for its moral and attention grabbing ideas. "What Do You Care What Other People Think? : Further Adventures of a Curious Character" is worthy of a 5-star review .

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