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Customer Reviews for

What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained

Average Rating 3.5
( 16 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2002

    Informal but excellent

    Robert L. Wolke's book, "What Einstein Told His Cook", is much better that those previous views listed on this site let on. I am a medical doctor with an extended education in biology, chemistry and physics, who is by no means insulted by Wolke's casual writing style. His book is not intended as a boring postgraduate text book. It is a fun to read book directed to everyday people with common understanding of the basics of science. I also have read Alton Brown's books. They also are to be recommended, but the topics covered are different-apples vs oranges in fact. Look again at "What Einstein Told His Cook" it was a pleasure to read and covered many interesting questions most people do not know the answer to; including arrogant professional cooks and medical doctors.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2011

    Cooking Chuckles

    I asked my culinary-interested teenager what he thought of this book and whether or not he would like to have it in his library. His reply was, "Sure, the information is interesting, and the recipes are great too." The book really is an entertaining read. One of the most humorous sections is the "primer on crackerpuncture", i.e., - Why crackers have holes in them. Professor Wolke's book should be viewed more as a scientific "appe-teaser" that stimulates a thirst for more knowledge, but also satisfying to the hungry who diet on smaller portions.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2003

    Questions answered and explained

    OK, so I'm not a professional chef, nor an arrogant biochemist, but I think Robert Wolke's style of writing in this book adds some fun to what could be a real boring read. He doesn't just answer the questions, he explains why it is so. I don't want to become an expert in the field - I just want to know quick answers, so I think this book is terrific!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2002

    Interesting, but pedestrian and unprofessional

    This book is a great idea poorly executed. If you have a college education and a sense of humor that transcends pop culture, I suggest you look elsewhere for good reading. The book is written in the all-too-common short-section format, popular with the attention-span impaired, and the ideas are wedged between Wolke's loquacious commentary (which, by the way, teaches you nothing). However, there are some interesting tidbits, if you are willing to mine a ton of ore to get the ounce of gold. Furthermore, although the author is clearly not condescending, he is informal to a fault, leaving the reader with rhetorical questions where there should be answers-raising the question: was this book even edited? Take more than a cursory look in the bookstore before paying the exorbitant price for this pedestrian work, and, if you have curiosities about science and food, look to Alton Brown of 'Good Eats' fame-he gets it right where Wolke just gets clueless.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2002

    A little too precious; a little short on information

    This is one of those aggravating tomes that uses a lot of pages to say very little. The writing is way too precious a lot of the time. I was interested in the subject matter going in, but I found the author's cutesy style to be extremely distracting. The author has some expertise, but he lets his smug prose ruin what could have been a very engaging, informative book. What a waste of time. Buy Alton Brown's book instead--he treats his reader with respect.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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