Customer Reviews for

When in the Course of Human Events: Arguing the Case for Southern Secession

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

A Real Eye-Popper

Along with, 'The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War' finally present Lincoln and the North's 'Watergate.' After the War the standard rule applied, which says 'The victor writes the history.' This viewpoint has preveiled for t...
Along with, 'The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War' finally present Lincoln and the North's 'Watergate.' After the War the standard rule applied, which says 'The victor writes the history.' This viewpoint has preveiled for the last 138 years, but is starting to be challenged. If you as an adult, read how a standard High School textbook treats the War you would be shocked. There is no balanced treatment there, so only in books like these can we get the -- rest of the story.

posted by Anonymous on January 12, 2004

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Neo-Confederate Mumbo Jumbo

If you like other Neo-Confederate books,those written by the Kennedy bros, and Grissom. You will love this, simply because you have already been fooled by the Neo-Confederate lies.... Mr. Adams attempts to say tariffs and taxes were the cause of the war not slavery,...
If you like other Neo-Confederate books,those written by the Kennedy bros, and Grissom. You will love this, simply because you have already been fooled by the Neo-Confederate lies.... Mr. Adams attempts to say tariffs and taxes were the cause of the war not slavery, Yet he fails to admit the truth that the south openly agreed to the tariffs they were paying at the time. It wasn't even a topic for them. He uses foreign journalist and not much else to make his point. Yet fails to mention that those journalist came from countries the South was trying to butter up to. Had they known slavery was the but cause. It would have been unlikly Britian and France would have ever supported the South in any fashion, since they ended slavery years earlier as a moral wrong(same as Lincoln saw it). Neo-Confederates love books like this, since it gives them a feeling of well-being, a sense that their ancestors were something other than horrid traitors to their nation. Its easy to proud of your ancestors when they were fighting for a 'good cause' such as the one Adams mentions, but its a bit more diffcult to be proud when your ancestors went to war to keep other men as slaves.

posted by Anonymous on April 16, 2002

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2004

    A Real Eye-Popper

    Along with, 'The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War' finally present Lincoln and the North's 'Watergate.' After the War the standard rule applied, which says 'The victor writes the history.' This viewpoint has preveiled for the last 138 years, but is starting to be challenged. If you as an adult, read how a standard High School textbook treats the War you would be shocked. There is no balanced treatment there, so only in books like these can we get the -- rest of the story.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2002

    Truly Excellent

    I began reading this book with passing interest and finished wanting to review many of the historical points mentioned. After an intense review, I came to the same conclusion that the war was indeed over economics and taxes. The war is still being fought today though and the South is still be denigrated in print, film, and in new law. This is easily seen by those who would rate this book a "one star" to extol the virtues of their own special brand of revisionist history. I live outside of the US and am glad to say that from abroad, the South's case remains very strong. We do not have to listen to those who would use illogical coments and theories to explain the war. From here, the war speaks for itself and the US experiment in real democracy is an absolute failure.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2002

    Neo-Confederate Mumbo Jumbo

    If you like other Neo-Confederate books,those written by the Kennedy bros, and Grissom. You will love this, simply because you have already been fooled by the Neo-Confederate lies.... Mr. Adams attempts to say tariffs and taxes were the cause of the war not slavery, Yet he fails to admit the truth that the south openly agreed to the tariffs they were paying at the time. It wasn't even a topic for them. He uses foreign journalist and not much else to make his point. Yet fails to mention that those journalist came from countries the South was trying to butter up to. Had they known slavery was the but cause. It would have been unlikly Britian and France would have ever supported the South in any fashion, since they ended slavery years earlier as a moral wrong(same as Lincoln saw it). Neo-Confederates love books like this, since it gives them a feeling of well-being, a sense that their ancestors were something other than horrid traitors to their nation. Its easy to proud of your ancestors when they were fighting for a 'good cause' such as the one Adams mentions, but its a bit more diffcult to be proud when your ancestors went to war to keep other men as slaves.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2001

    This book made me sick

    The propaganda in this book should not be printed. It is a mockery of this country and it is times like this i resent supporting the first amendment.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    Charles Adams is an Economic Historian. Rather than just telli

    Charles Adams is an Economic Historian.
    Rather than just telling who, when and where things happened, from an economic perspective, you learn the motivation behind why things happen. Although you are always given moral justifications for various wars, when you boil it all down, most wars are fought for economic reasons. The vixcor's version of history, tells that the American "Civil War" was fought over slavery. Nowhere else in the world, has slavery been eliminated by war. It has died due to economic reasons, as it was in the process of dying in the United States. Just as the original 13 colonies declared their independence for autonomy, the Southern states resented being treated as colonies of the north. The tariffs were imposed to protect and benefit northern manufacturing. However the majority was paid by the Southern cotton trade and the Southerners resented it. Charles Adams writes an objective study of the facts.

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  • Posted November 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The one and only book about the Civil War if stranded on a desert island. Don't be afraid to look at the other side of the coin . You will be Enlightened.

    This is the best book for a person who will open their mind and not allow Political Correctness to fog the issues like it has done for 99.9% of the public . The Federal Government has done a great job until now , telling its side of the conflict . Now read the other side for once in your life . Political Correctness has made us all think and talk like Politicans .Vague, crooked and decietfull if we let it . The world and life should not be like that . Think for yourself,look at both sides of an argument .If one side presents its argument and the other does not have a voice, conflicts can never be solved . This book finally presents the Southern point of view .Enjoy !

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2002

    The winners write the history...

    It is a well known maxim the 'the winners write the history'. This does not apply to the Adams book. He correctly identifies that the very high tarrifs where the cause of the war. He also points out various comments by Lincoln on slavery and that the issue did not appear in the North until the THRID YEAR of the war when support for it was lagging. The reviewers who panned the book are victims of the history that was written by the Northern winners. I claim the the republic defined by the founders died at Bull Run. There is evidence that the New England states considered secession twice prior to the war of Northern agression. When they did so, NO ONE argued that secession was unthinkable. The South was no military threat to the North; they simply wanted to be left alone to go their own way. It was Lincoln's obsession that the big federal government sought by the Hamilton branch of the founders had to be preserved that led to the war. The small government - in the vein of the Jefferson branch of the founders - suffered its first blow at Bull Run, and was finished off by Wilson and FDR. NOTE: A 'civil war' is one between two factions striving to control a country. This was NOT the case with the War of Northern Agression. The South wanted the right to a government of their choice guaranteed by the Declaration of Independence.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2000

    FROM A SON OF THE SOUTH

    I begin this review with absolutely no forethought, please excuse my rambling style. I shall remain proud of the Confederacy they are the true image of Patriotism. Forfeiting all to preserve country and family. Slavery was not the primary issue here and in the context of the time period was well on its way to dissolution. I have never made my own study of the history yet I stumble from time to time over bits and pieces of what Mr. Adams presents here. It is time and past time that this information is compiled for easy reference. It is quite clear that the 'professional' review posted here is from one who accepts without question all that is purveyed by the keepers of 'history'. This is as dangerous a mistake as can be made when seeking out the lessons of our past. I refrain from offering 5 stars based only on style of writing, it shows the trademark of his legal training and is presented with more reiteration than I deem useful. I can give my highest recommendation for the content. Those of us who are more than 15 years beyond high school will all benefit from reading this and similar texts because much of this is finding its way into the classrooms of our own children

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2000

    A Revolutionary Book On The Origins of The Civil War

    Charles Adams has written a book that should be required reading for anyone interested in the origins of the War for Southern Independence (Civil War). His arguments are logical and persuasive, showing that the war was really not over slavery, which is taught in all the public schools and most colleges, but about money, resources and power. The South had the audacity to secede and then declare their ports 'tariff-free'. This could not be tolerated by the Northern states, as it would cripple business and threaten the government. Therefore, Lincoln prosecuted the war with the full support of Wall Street and the business community. It is really a revolutionary book and should set the record straight on the history of the war for those who have open minds.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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